81 Exterior Gable Roofline House Brick Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A decorative cinder block wall edges the property and provides a sense of enclosure without hemming in the yard too tightly.
The solution to the problem of the telephone pole was to place the entry at the side. “Putting the home entry on the side allows one to create full rooms at each end of the house without running a hallway through them,” says Wu.
The solution to the problem of the telephone pole was to place the entry at the side. “Putting the home entry on the side allows one to create full rooms at each end of the house without running a hallway through them,” says Wu.
The front of A Mews House was allowed a 10-foot setback, similar to existing homes on the street. A utility pole proved too expensive to relocate—it would have cost $18,000 to do so. “That pole dictated the way a car would access the property, thereby dictating the car pad location and eventually heavily influencing the location of circulation in the house,” says architect Alex Wu.
Located in Springfield, Missouri, Streamline House is set on a hill just above the Jones Branch, a spring-fed stream that pumps more than 300,000 gallons of crystal-clear water through the site every day.
The front door doubles as a garage door for the vintage car, which parks in the front entry at night.
The five-bedroom, seven-bath home includes a basketball court and sport lawn. An existing barn on site was also repurposed into an activity space for the family’s three children.
The house draws power from a geothermal well system with wells drilled in the front yard.
A Cor-Ten retaining wall contours the site into terraces to create more usable outdoor space, and was carefully positioned to save existing mature trees.
The renovation introduced additional steel beams to reinforce the “sagging cantilevered roof.” The team also added insulation, rebuilt the chimney/parapet, and supplemented roof shingles with ones that were consistent with the originals.
The south view of the home shows how “Wright characteristically located the house to be slightly below the highest point of the hill,” says the firm, which has renovated many Wright residences.
After: The front door is tucked into the brick facade—a material choice made by Fredrick. Per the architects: “Walls are constructed of Norman brick manufactured by the Claycraft Company, who also provided bricks for Eero Saarinen’s house in Cranbrook, Michigan.”
After: A commanding carport greets visitors at the entry point to the house.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
For the extension, Bureau Fraai decided to extend the current old barn next to the farmhouse. While the existing barn was built from bricks and ceramic roof tiles, the façade and roof of the extension are made of black pre-weathered titanium zinc with hidden aluminum window frames that give it a bold and modern feel.
The rear view of the home.
"The wood exterior was selected to make the house blend in with the landscape," Troyer says. "I wanted something that didn’t require painting and aged in a way that would provide a degree of richness. " He envisioned a garden that better surrounded the home, and a more modern exterior. He used ash wood slates of various dimensions from Thermory USA, which were heat-treated for a more sustainable finish.
The ornate facade of the renovated, 6,130-square-foot Haterlie was restored, while the architects demolished the mid-20th century additions to the center of the property and a section of an old "stable" near the rear boundary.
A shot of the two houses from across the pond. “It's campfires by the pond, dinner cooked in the wood fire oven…we are living the dream,” say the brothers.
A view from the outdoor deck with Jon's house on the right and Nik's home to the left.
At 2,120 square feet, Jon's home (on the left) is slightly smaller than his brother's 2,540-square-foot house (on the right). Though the homes feature different floor plans, each has five bedrooms and three bathrooms.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
Designers Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon kept many of the architectural details of the 300-year-old cow barn they turned into a second home, including its terra-cotta roof tiles. The primary structural change took place on the front facade, which they tore down and rebuilt, opening space for a traditional oeil-de-boeuf window. The door on the left opens to a workshop. In addition to designing furniture, the couple also create interiors for select clients.
Exposed steel, concrete soffits, and cement-washed bricks were been chosen as key components of the home due to the materials having low-maintenance, yet being extremely durable.
The exterior of The Great Barn.
"The large, overhanging patio and timber shutters assist in eliminating unwanted afternoon sun. The remainder of spaces remain oriented north, with optimal overhangs to ensure climate comfort throughout seasons," explains Engelbrecht.
Warm tones of timber combined with polished concrete floors and industrial-style cabinetry give the interiors a modern, paired-back look.
There are two nearby dams on the farmland that provide drinking water for the off-grid home.
The entrance door is made of mirror-like glass to enhance privacy.
The gaps in the brickwork naturally brighten the interiors.
The gaps between the courses also allow the brick wall to double as a window, framing views and drawing in more light and air.
The traditional bricklaying technique enabled the second-level interior space to become larger.
The well-preserved midcentury home sits on a half-acre lot near the Knollwood Country Club in Granada Hills. The lot features a gorgeous outdoor space that includes a sprawling lawn, a covered patio, and a swimming pool and spa.
The outdoor space has been landscaped with synthetic turf, as well as drought-tolerant plants.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
Beautifully renovated, the home has excellent curb appeal with low maintenance landscaping.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.
"Upon arrival, you enter straight off Abbott Kinney into a calm room where members check in," Sutherland says. "The interior is simple, elegant, and inviting."
The historic site consists of an old farmhouse, stable, and shed, along with bunkers and artillery foundations from the both World War I and World War II. The stable has been converted into a modern 5,683-square-foot bed and breakfast establishment called The Bunkers.
Incisions made in the façade amplify the contrast between the red and yellow brickwork.
Streamlined sections of metal-framed windows with triple glazing stylishly connect the brick and wooden volumes.
For the farmhouse residence, the team has removed all the elements that did not have any significant heritage value. "Valuable historical constructions are thus brought into equilibrium with the scarcely added volumes," says Damiaan Vanhoutte, a co-founder of the firm.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
A view of the new front door. "At the second level, brickwork gradually opens up to become a perforated brick screen for the roof top deck," explain the architects.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.