305 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Located in Providence, Rhode Island, the American Woolens Dye house is a brick and timber structure that was originally built in 1880. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and it served as a textile mill before a thoughtful and extensive renovation transformed the property into a gorgeous live/work space.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
An enclosed porch with a fireplace sits between the living wing and the services wing, providing a pivotal point from which the home fans out.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
Architects Melissa and Jacob Brillhart wanted a home that took advantage of a lush lot and minimized any impact on the landscape. Drawing on principles of tropical modernism and the dogtrot model, the couple designed and built a simple, practical structure that is rich in cultural meaning. "There is something to be said for living in a glass house totally surrounded by nature," says Melissa. "I can't put my finger on it, but it has an impact on how I feel. It just isn’t the same experience as living in a house with traditional punched openings."
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
On the site's southwest side, the second canopy structure atop the guest suite features deep overhangs to shelter the pool and lawn from the intense setting sun.
"The canopy structure was carefully edited down to only its essential parts," explain the architects. "Every component was designed so that each member is purposeful and is exactly the size and shape it needs to be and no more. The fabrication and assembly process was fully considered to allow for straightforward construction."
The west-facing outdoor patio is protected by deep roof overhangs lined with southern yellow pine.
Ipe decking connects the main house to the rear guest suite/pool house and pool, which were strategically placed to take advantage of natural shade conditions.
The view from outside the entrance gate, which was constructed from steel with welded wire infill. The entry path was made of Leuders limestone, the same material used on the outdoor patios and fireplace.
In response to a geotechnical report that revealed poor soils, the architects deepened the piers to support a structure slab that floats eight inches above grade. The unusual foundation design allows the elevated home to sit very close to the trees without negatively impacting the root systems.
Located in the heart of the city, the property "provided the best of both worlds," explain the couple, who were drawn to its location and its many mature trees that created the feeling of being immersed in nature.
The concrete walls are perforated by large and small windows that frame views of the trees and local forest, as the site doesn't offer expansive views of the surrounding landscape.
The concrete pool structure has been conceived as a separate element to the home and is sunk into the sloped ground.
The entire home opens up toward the north, and the entrance block is set back from the rest of the house.
An outdoor pool is situated among the trees, allowing swimmers to be completely immersed in nature. Like the home, its footprint was determined by the existing trees on the site, and its otherwise geometric form is playfully interrupted by a diversion around a tree trunk.
The home is divided into four different blocks, arranged to avoid impacting on the trees on site.
In Chile's Chiloé Archipelago, architect Guillermo Acuña developed a 12-acre island for his friends and family to unwind, first with a boathouse, later with pathway-connected cabins at the water's edge. Design details include glazed walls, eco-friendly pine, and a bright red palette that calls to mind the intensely colored chilco flowers that bloom here come spring and summer.
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
The box-shaped extension plays off the familiar farmhouse typology, creating a series of intriguing contrasts.
The ground-floor social spaces open up to a timber deck, which is used to extend the living room in warmer months.
The architects thought of the silver cedar cladding to the addition as "an exterior surface, skin, or bark" that wraps around the minimal cube form.
The brickwork of the original gabled farmhouse was painted white, referencing the local vernacular, and a new corrugated metal roof was added.
Building the addition upward instead of outward allowed for more space and better views without excavating across the hilltop.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
If you've never set foot within a shipping container home, you might imagine them to be simple rectangles with no real consideration put into design, proportion, and the division of rooms. Well, think again: these floor plans prove that shipping container homes can be efficient, sustainable, and even exciting.
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
Built in 1949, Byrdview is one of four residential homes designed by the famed midcentury architect William Pereira, known for his futuristic designs that include the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco.
Located at 1811 Bel Air Road, Case Study House #16 was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1953. The residence has been meticulously maintained over the years by its two owners, and today it’s the only surviving Case Study design by Ellwood.
Set in the southwest hills of Portland, Oregon, this 1965 home was designed by noted local architect William Fletcher and entirely renovated in 2008. The low-lying home with a bright blue door was customized with elements that complemented the original midcentury architecture, including updates to all bathrooms, opening up the kitchen and adding cabinetry in Oregon black walnut, and transforming the car port into a dining room.
Rudolph used red cannonballs as weights to hold the home’s signature wood shutters in place.
For architect Stephen Chung, the design of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home was all about blending into the natural environment. The first floor is a serene composition of white and wood. The demand for a domestic office space inspired him to build up, adding a second floor for him to "experiment." In a departure from the Cape Cod aesthetic that rules his block, he was able to give the addition a modernist take, while also literally reflecting the existing landscape of the neighborhood. The entire 1,100-square-foot adjunct that encompasses his second story office-studio, master suite, and fort for his two young sons is swathed in mirrored siding and plate-glass windows.
At dusk, the home emits a warm glow, appearing as a welcoming refuge in the landscape. The strong horizontality of the roof canopy visually accentuates the undulations of the surrounding landscape.
The bold geometric form is intended to offer refuge, while deep eaves provide shade in the summer and shelter from rain.
“We want the house to blend into the environment and feel like part of this place, not stand out,” says architect Ben Callery.
Neatly tucked away on a tree-filled acre-lot within the Rolling Hills gated community, the Coe House was designed by Richard Neutra in 1950 for a local engineer and has since only had one other owner throughout the last 70 years.
Affordable, adorable, and in many cases, transportable, these tiny homes made a big impact on our readers this year.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
The independent modular guest houses give the client the flexibility to expand in the future.
Untreated Lapacho timber planks—the same material used on the main house—clad the exterior of the two guest homes. In contrast to the horizontal cladding of the main house, the planks are vertically oriented here.
Located in the countryside in southern Uruguay, the prefabs overlook a gentle rolling landscape with eucalyptus trees, farm animals, and mountains in the far distance. The owners also have many domestic birds—including swans, peacocks, and ducks that freely roam the site.
McCrae House 1 & 2
Street view
The second floor houses a 900-square-foot apartment that can be kept separate from the main floor residence for rental purposes or can be connected via a door. "In what had been an attic for storing fan belts and auto supplies, we created a large open apartment with full bath and kitchen," says McCuen.
At first glance, the structure appears to be a single-story home. The surrounding trees create additional privacy as the yard begins to slope toward the rear.
Modern in Montana: a Flathead Lake cabin that's a grownup version of a treehouse.
From the rear, references to Florida Cracker architecture is more obvious, with views of the home's wide veranda and central corridor. Adding an additional 800 square feet of living space, both the front and rear porches are a distinct part of the home's design and its close relationship with the outdoors.
The home's overhangs provide shade. “We wanted to make sure the house was comfortable,” says Ikegami. “You have cross-ventilation, and the interior is filled with light from the clerestory.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.