241 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The simple composition of the new house is inspired by midcentury modern homes. Instead of demolishing the old house, the couple decided move it to a new location a few miles away. “After all, there was no reason to put twenty odd tons in a landfill, especially since it had good structural integrity,” says designer Jamie Chioco. “It could make a good first-time home for someone just as it did for me”
The River House spans 3,100 square feet, with 500 additional square feet of exterior deck and patio space.
The home is designed for natural ventilation and shading with manually operated windows and window walls, and deep overhangs.
A bridge connects the home’s two volumes, which are divided between private and public spaces. The private spaces are protected through a series of screens and shading devices, while the main public living spaces are fluidly open to the outdoors.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
A two-story, timber volume holds the private areas while a one-story concrete pavilion is more social and communal. Large openings blend indoor and outdoor spaces while allowing coastal breezes to become part of the home environment.
A launch pad for the homeowner’s adventurous lifestyle, Wallis Lake House has an outdoor shower at the lower-level entry so Adam can rinse off before he steps inside.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
A massive oak tree is the focal point of the communal entry courtyard. The apartments were originally designed by Harwell Hamilton Harris for Thomas Cranfill, an English
professor at The University of Texas at Austin courtyard.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
Landscape designer Kenneth Philip worked with mwworks to fill in the forested setting.
The home features a flat roofline, and it’s composed of stained red cedar, concrete, and basalt—materials that weather well and blend seamlessly with the land.
Clarissa and Peter live in one of the units and plan to rent the second unit, which is almost a mirror image of the first.
The concrete walls are perforated by large and small windows that frame views of the trees and local forest, as the site doesn't offer expansive views of the surrounding landscape.
The concrete pool structure has been conceived as a separate element to the home and is sunk into the sloped ground.
The entire home opens up toward the north, and the entrance block is set back from the rest of the house.
An outdoor pool is situated among the trees, allowing swimmers to be completely immersed in nature. Like the home, its footprint was determined by the existing trees on the site, and its otherwise geometric form is playfully interrupted by a diversion around a tree trunk.
The home is divided into four different blocks, arranged to avoid impacting on the trees on site.
Pockets of greenery and outdoor space add dimension to a two-family home in downtown Tel Aviv.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
A post and beam entry plus a delicate brise soleil make up the entrance to 572 W Santa Elena Road.
The dramatic home features a striking black and white facade.
A weathered metal sculpture at the front door echoes the larger piece in the home’s central yard.
At 16,700 square feet, the home is a lot to behold—but the streamlined palette makes it easier to take it all in.
The Ramada House in Tucson, Arizona, is one of Chafee’s most recognized designs. In 1983, she became the first woman from Arizona to be named a fellow at the American Institute of Architects.
The one-story homes blend seamlessly into the background due to a palette of basalt, cement, and imported African wood.
The 15-foot windows provide breathtaking views of the surrounding hills and blue ocean waters.
The 12 homes are for-sale and rented throughout the year to tourists. When POLO Architects first become involved with the project, they wanted to make sure that the designs would be "as viable and sustainable as possible," POLO Architects Co-founder Patrick Lootens says.
For Mount Washington Residence, McBride Architects use prefabrication to save on costs while going big on functionality and style.
Fifty miles north of New York City, a private island with a controversial home and guesthouse built from Frank Lloyd Wright’s drawings seeks a new buyer.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
Street view
Wide glass apertures connect the living and dining room to the new backyard.
The timber-clad home is nestled into the lush foliage of the existing landscape.
Designed in 1950 for a teacher named Foster, this unique two-bedroom midcentury known as the Foster House was one of the architect's earliest residential commissions.
Surrounded by 1.2 acres of flat land, the contemporary residence is designed to frame a unique, long view of Los Angeles—as well as the mountains beyond.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
The expansive estate sprawls over several terraced levels.
The Richard and Helen Arens House glowing gorgeously at night.
The spacious backyard features a pristine hillside pool and hardscape overlooking panoramic views from the Santa Monica Bay all the way to Catalina.
As Wright’s first L.A. project, the iconic Hollyhock House was built between 1919 and 1921 and was filled with challenges from beginning to end. Enter Aline Barnsdall, the wealthy oil heiress and arts patron who held the dream of having a live-in venue to produce her own avant-garde plays. Wright wanted to create a design that would be defined by the region and that took advantage of Southern California's temperate climate. To do this, each interior space is echoed with an exterior space in the form of pergolas, porches, outdoor sleeping quarters, glass doors, and rooftop terraces that look out to the Hollywood Hills and the Los Angeles Basin.
Slatted Tzalama wood screens provide privacy and light control as well as a pop of contrast against the concrete structure.
Set on an expansive tree-filled lot near Griffith Park in Los Angeles, the residence provides easy parking via three individual, internally accessed garages.
The home taps into solar energy sources and cross ventilation to reduce energy demands.
A densely planted garden shields the living room and dining area from view of the street.
Located in a Querétaro housing development, Casa Campanario is surrounded by new construction.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.