37 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Gable Roofline Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
The box-shaped extension plays off the familiar farmhouse typology, creating a series of intriguing contrasts.
The brickwork of the original gabled farmhouse was painted white, referencing the local vernacular, and a new corrugated metal roof was added.
Building the addition upward instead of outward allowed for more space and better views without excavating across the hilltop.
The gabled entry features a patterned, wood rainscreen that evokes the forked ribs of the Saguaro cactus while the recessed entry is akin to a Saguaro boot, the holes in the giant cacti that many desert animals use as their homes.
A disguised door for guests
The house draws its name, “Pleats,” from the corrugated metal that wraps the gabled volume, reminiscent of the pleated exterior of the Saguaro cactus.
The recessed entry features a disguised door for guests
The front of A Mews House was allowed a 10-foot setback, similar to existing homes on the street. A utility pole proved too expensive to relocate—it would have cost $18,000 to do so. “That pole dictated the way a car would access the property, thereby dictating the car pad location and eventually heavily influencing the location of circulation in the house,” says architect Alex Wu.
The solution to the problem of the telephone pole was to place the entry at the side. “Putting the home entry on the side allows one to create full rooms at each end of the house without running a hallway through them,” says Wu.
The solution to the problem of the telephone pole was to place the entry at the side. “Putting the home entry on the side allows one to create full rooms at each end of the house without running a hallway through them,” says Wu.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
"The wood exterior was selected to make the house blend in with the landscape," Troyer says. "I wanted something that didn’t require painting and aged in a way that would provide a degree of richness. " He envisioned a garden that better surrounded the home, and a more modern exterior. He used ash wood slates of various dimensions from Thermory USA, which were heat-treated for a more sustainable finish.
The trailer is set on wheels, so the home is easily relocatable, and can be registered as a caravan.  A power drill winds the slide-out inward and outward.
The Sojourner tiny house was built atop a high-quality, galvanized trailer chassis.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
A collage of brightly colored, geometric volumes comprise the Ettore Sottsass–designed residence of Lesley Bailey and Adrian Olabuenaga, proprietors of jewelry and accessories company ACME Studio. Completed in 1997, this home is one of few private commissions designed by the Italian architect, who passed away in 2007.
View from outdoor porch by Low Design Office
The surrounding grounds were relandscaped to create even more privacy and garden views from the house and around the tennis court and pools.
Essentially, the entrance was kept in the same spot, with the chimney to the far right side.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.