68 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Gable Roofline House Design Photos And Ideas

The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
The box-shaped extension plays off the familiar farmhouse typology, creating a series of intriguing contrasts.
The brickwork of the original gabled farmhouse was painted white, referencing the local vernacular, and a new corrugated metal roof was added.
Building the addition upward instead of outward allowed for more space and better views without excavating across the hilltop.
The elongated midcentury facade of 946 W. Ceres Road is classic Palm Springs and features beautiful native landscaping by a local landscape architect.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
A patio between the two structures serves as the house's primary entrance, and a place to hang out and grill. Architectural lighting in the walkway and above the garage reinforce the addition's geometric lines.
The town of Vail has enlisted 359 Design's help to produce 32 affordable housing units in the Chamonix Vail project. The modular homes come in five different types and are fabricated in Idaho before being shipped to the site.
“We were trying to get some sort of verticality, so that it appears the house doesn’t just hover into the ground, but also rises up to the sky,” says Stuart Narofsky, FAIA and principal architect.
From the rear, the home’s layout as a two-story structure becomes clearer, as does its aggressive use of angular dimensions and expansive walls of glass.
A wooden screen provide protection to the home's entry while the garage door is discreetly hidden in the quartz sinter facade.
The gabled entry features a patterned, wood rainscreen that evokes the forked ribs of the Saguaro cactus while the recessed entry is akin to a Saguaro boot, the holes in the giant cacti that many desert animals use as their homes.
The recessed entry features a disguised door for guests
A disguised door for guests
The house draws its name, “Pleats,” from the corrugated metal that wraps the gabled volume, reminiscent of the pleated exterior of the Saguaro cactus.
The front of A Mews House was allowed a 10-foot setback, similar to existing homes on the street. A utility pole proved too expensive to relocate—it would have cost $18,000 to do so. “That pole dictated the way a car would access the property, thereby dictating the car pad location and eventually heavily influencing the location of circulation in the house,” says architect Alex Wu.
The solution to the problem of the telephone pole was to place the entry at the side. “Putting the home entry on the side allows one to create full rooms at each end of the house without running a hallway through them,” says Wu.
The solution to the problem of the telephone pole was to place the entry at the side. “Putting the home entry on the side allows one to create full rooms at each end of the house without running a hallway through them,” says Wu.
The black-stained wood siding of the Crossfield St House references London’s timber-clad houses from the 17th and 18th centuries.
The architects planned the home’s footprint around the roots of the heritage oak trees on the site, and ensured that the building height would fit under the canopy.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
This Eichler is wrapped with vertical western red cedar. One of the reasons Klopf Architecture selected this material is because of its low-VOC stain. It matches the color of the original siding, which had sadly seen better days.
Klopf Architecture's modest 72-square-foot addition at the front of the home blends in with the original structure while giving the owners a greater sense of openness in the master and hall bathrooms. Inside, the re-imagined great room now features dining space.
Located in a coveted, beachfront, gated community, this Malibu home is surrounded by ocean views and miles of walking trails.
The street wall, new addition, and existing building are all united in their color palette of shades of white, but are distinct in their materials, shape, and joint patterns. The street wall and existing building have a horizontal emphasis, while the second floor's addition has a vertical one.
The rear view of the home.
"The wood exterior was selected to make the house blend in with the landscape," Troyer says. "I wanted something that didn’t require painting and aged in a way that would provide a degree of richness. " He envisioned a garden that better surrounded the home, and a more modern exterior. He used ash wood slates of various dimensions from Thermory USA, which were heat-treated for a more sustainable finish.
The home features a two-car garage with clerestory windows that keep the interior bright.
Set on an expansive meadow and overlooking the sea, Rode House is a semicircular residence on Chiloé Island featuring a dramatic, sloping roof that extends over an interior courtyard. Pezo von Ellrichshausen is a Chilean firm known for their arresting, geometric architecture. In true form, the striking, semicircular residence boasts a roof that drops steeply to form two sharp peaks at either end.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
A collage of brightly colored, geometric volumes comprise the Ettore Sottsass–designed residence of Lesley Bailey and Adrian Olabuenaga, proprietors of jewelry and accessories company ACME Studio. Completed in 1997, this home is one of few private commissions designed by the Italian architect, who passed away in 2007.
The meticulously landscaped front yard is low maintenance and features drought tolerant plants and a sprinkler system.
View of New Roof Deck
View from outdoor porch by Low Design Office
The surrounding grounds were relandscaped to create even more privacy and garden views from the house and around the tennis court and pools.
Essentially, the entrance was kept in the same spot, with the chimney to the far right side.
The pinwheel plan also led to the creation of two sheltered outdoor spaces: the morning porch and the evening porch.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
To help keep costs at bay, the dark exterior siding and feature staircase were constructed of fir plywood.
Duerksen now runs his own architecture firm out of the home.
The new additions of the home are clad in bespoke cedar profiles that inject a modern flair to the 20th-century brick building.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.