386 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The tiny home is clad with standing-seam metal and cedar. An outdoor kitchen area on the deck provides added living space and ties the home to the natural landscape.
Tony and Charlotte Perez designed and built their own 280-square-foot home, which features an expansive deck off of the front facade.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
Whipplewood’s North facade. “There’s always people coming out to the house to hang around and be on the water. It was a house for one person, but it had to have a lot of social space—that was the idea with the cantilever decks and all the glass,” explains architect Eric Sokol.
"Radical sustainability
Charred Siberian timber complements the original brick home.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
The Goya House is broken down into a series of pavilions, including a separate master suite (seen at left) connected by a glass bridge.
The house's front door, tucked under one of many cantilevering portions of the roof, comes after passing through an interior courtyard. "It’s not just an axial arrival to the front door," says Wright. "You come in and shift to the right, and cross a small bridge over the entry water feature. Those little shifts [help] guide a visitor to see these different points of view."
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
All of the labor and materials to build the homes were graciously donated, meaning that the design couldn't be too extravagant and work well with the given materials. Community First! wanted each home to feel warm and welcoming, but also be relatively maintenance-free.
"The main issue with site planning is the units are relatively dense out there," Taylor says. "The building has to take advantage of sun orientation and seasonal breezes, but also have privacy. This site, in particular, was also next to a swale so there are many insects during the summer months."
Community First! has anchored itself within the community through partnerships with various businesses, other nonprofits, faith organizations, and local schools, offering its residents opportunities for success in every aspect of their lives.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
The home features a flat roofline, and it’s composed of stained red cedar, concrete, and basalt—materials that weather well and blend seamlessly with the land.
Windows wrap around the sides of the cabins to maximize views.
The timber structures are made from durable Douglas Fir posts and beams.
The sloped metal roofs were designed to capture rain, which is used in the cabins.
The concrete walls are perforated by large and small windows that frame views of the trees and local forest, as the site doesn't offer expansive views of the surrounding landscape.
The concrete pool structure has been conceived as a separate element to the home and is sunk into the sloped ground.
An outdoor pool is situated among the trees, allowing swimmers to be completely immersed in nature. Like the home, its footprint was determined by the existing trees on the site, and its otherwise geometric form is playfully interrupted by a diversion around a tree trunk.
The home is divided into four different blocks, arranged to avoid impacting on the trees on site.
The warm amber color of the cedar makes the shed glow at night.
The pared-back approach of the remodel begins with the front entry, where horizontal bands of orange-toned cedar were replaced with a refined wood screen.
The home sits lightly upon its heavily wooded site.
A balance of open and enclosed, public and private, the cottage embraces all seasons of the year with a variety of spaces that meet programmatic needs.
The large overhangs add drama to the cottage’s simple form with far-reaching timber-clad planes.
The large overhangs provide year-round comfort while adding a strong architectural element to the simple massing.
Smart storage tactics are combined with a U-shaped sofa to maximize space in this delightful tiny home.
In Chile's Chiloé Archipelago, architect Guillermo Acuña developed a 12-acre island for his friends and family to unwind, first with a boathouse, later with pathway-connected cabins at the water's edge. Design details include glazed walls, eco-friendly pine, and a bright red palette that calls to mind the intensely colored chilco flowers that bloom here come spring and summer.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
Most of the year, the family keep the sliding glass doors—which span 16 feet from the living room to the exterior deck—of their Tampa dwelling open, giving it the aura of a Sarasota Modern home. Stunning cantilevered overhangs, in the spirit of Paul Rudolph's Umbrella House, help tame the sun.
The box-shaped extension plays off the familiar farmhouse typology, creating a series of intriguing contrasts.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.