92 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Green Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

A bridge connects the home’s two volumes, which are divided between private and public spaces. The private spaces are protected through a series of screens and shading devices, while the main public living spaces are fluidly open to the outdoors.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
A two-story, timber volume holds the private areas while a one-story concrete pavilion is more social and communal. Large openings blend indoor and outdoor spaces while allowing coastal breezes to become part of the home environment.
Designed by Austin, Texas–based studio Andersson-Wise Architects, the 12,500-square-foot Stone Creek Camp is sited on a sloping hill whose topography guides visitors to discover the grounds slowly: from the gatehouse to the master house, main lodge, and guesthouse. The eco-friendly family retreat features a stacked wood facade that was built from fallen trees found on the site; a sod green roof that provides insulation; and regionally sourced construction materials—including stone, wood, windows, and doors.
At night, the home glows in the middle of the Norwegian wilderness.
Wide stairs lead to an open veranda that divides the family wing from the guest quarters. In another nod to rural Scandinavian style, the roof is covered in sod. “When the grass waves in the wind, it softens the rectilinear nature of the house,” says Casper.
The house is raised on columns to improve sight lines, keep snow drifts at bay, and lessen the building’s impact on the land.
Borrowing from the local vernacular, they clad the structure in skigard, a split-rail construction traditionally used for farm fences.
Designer couple Casper and Lexie Mork-Ulnes created a rustic retreat for their family on a mountaintop 45 minutes from Lillehammer, Norway.
A sitting area in the front yard encourages neighbors to stop by for a chat.
The home's green roof is an ode to the life of Arango's grandmother.
The compact residence, sided with tarred pine and glass, is surrounded by the Andes mountains.
Architect Alfonso Arango designed a 258-square-foot retreat with a green roof on the property of his childhood home in La Calera, Colombia.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
A glazed section perfectly frames country views amidst the book-lined walls of the home’s sitting room. A mobile panel allows residents to modulate light and privacy as they please.
The home is set amidst the monumentality of the Swiss Alps.
The home extends along a natural ridge.
One of the home’s larch-clad volumes appears to float above the site.
The U-shaped plan of Music Box Residence by Scott Edwards Architecture has large volumes on both sides with a glassy two-story entry space in the middle. A long bridge, with a bamboo forest below, leads from the sidewalk to the main entry. The exterior is clad in black stained siding reminiscent of sho-sugi ban in order to pay homage to the family's Japanese ancestry.
In order to achieve a contemporary exterior while still keeping a feeling of warmth, Martin Gomez Arquitectos chose to use dark metal, black flagstone, and lapacho wood as cladding.
The black-stained wood siding of the Crossfield St House references London’s timber-clad houses from the 17th and 18th centuries.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
The upper floor is wrapped in glass, with the exception of the solid wood front door and the cantilevering roof.
The 4,600-square-foot home is set on bucolic farmland.
The home's two volumes are distinct not only in their orientation, but also in their materiality. The lower level is wrapped in stone, while the upper level is composed of glass.
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Exterior within Context
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Japanese architect Takashi Kobayashi of the Tree House People has been declared a “tree house master” by Design Made in Japan. Seamlessly integrating nature and design, this tiny tree house is certainly not just for children.
Made of 100-percent recyclable materials and equipped with smart home technology, this prefab known as SysHaus is a new model by a Brazilian construction and engineering start-up.
Entry to home via bridge
Putting green on the roof deck
One of the main goals of the construction was to do as little harm as possible to the existing environment, which includes waterways that salmon depend upon. Herrin and his team created a garden roof that covers the full extent of the home to meet this objective. “This helps control storm water runoff and also replaces lost insect habitat—insects being a critical food source for juvenile salmon,” he says.
Project Name: Dawnsknoll
A 100-foot-long glass wall opens the view up to views of the bay.
The home's shell of timber and corten steel will develop a natural patina over time.
"Because the clients expressed a lifelong interest in Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy, the unfolding sequence with which one encounters these modern artists’ installations inspired our strategy for approaching the residence," notes the firm. "Approaching guests follow a meandering stone wall through the woods and meadow of the site, eventually leading to a crisp line of Corten steel piercing the meadow; moving toward that image ultimately reveals the main residence, and conveys the visitor to its threshold."
The home is located far from the road on the northwest corner of the property and oriented toward views of the water.
A bird's eye view of the home, which sits on five acres of bluff top.
Located in the Hampton Bays, the Peconic House is sandwiched between an old-growth forest and the waterfront.
Dawnsknoll’s exterior sidings are cement panels and Resysta wood. The house’s front gate and garage are made from recycled wood.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.