164 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Prefab Design Photos And Ideas

The LumiPod is equipped with Rockwool insulation, exterior rain sheeting, and a moisture protection film. A Toshiba reversible air conditioning system is installed by default for heating and cooling.
The building’s dark wooden exterior and low profile helps it blend into its surroundings.
The Lumicene glass panels, which double as the entry, are secured with two locks at each end.
The standard LumiPod is clad in charred Douglas fir siding inspired by the traditional Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method of wood preservation. Clients can also choose from a variety of cladding options.
Blackout curtains installed along a curved rod can cover the entire glass window to provide privacy and block light.
Built of steel, the LumiPod structure can be set on screw piles for minimal site impact.
The curved glass panels slide completely open and pocket into the sides of the structure to create a seamless indoor/outdoor living experience. The ceiling is covered with a merino wool felt fabric.
The prefab’s windows include double-glazed panels and aluminum frames with thermal breaks. Customers can also select triple glazing as well.
One of the first LumiPods was completed in the French Alps at 1,000 meters above sea level in the heart of a pine-and-oak forest.
All lightHouses come with custom OxBox (oxidized steel) and Barn (wood) siding, as well as a collection of unique exterior steel features.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
"Radical sustainability
These prefab ADUs are the perfect solution for those in need of a separate home office.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
An enclosed porch with a fireplace sits between the living wing and the services wing, providing a pivotal point from which the home fans out.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
The 1,950-square-foot Koto LivingHome 2 (Piha) is organized around a central open-plan living space with a direct connection to the outdoors. The design is named after the two courtyards located on both sides of the home.
Wrapped in timber, the 1,016-square-foot Koto LivingHome 1 (Yksi) includes two bedrooms and a flex room on the first floor. The open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area is located on the floor above.
Koto and Plant Prefab will work directly with homeowners to determine optimal site placement and adhere to energy-saving passive solar principles.
“The clients wanted a house that blended into nature,” notes Berensson.
The weeHouse has also been applied to a new, housing-for-the-homeless prototypes designed for the Envision Community Group in Minneapolis.
Multi-discipli­nary Swedish firm Claesson Koivisto Rune created the plans for this home for design-minded kit-house manu­fact­urer Arkitektus. Considering the unique balance of the facade, as well as its climate-specific construction—the asymmetrical "lifted" roof allows for both water drainage and maximum light during the dark winter months—Claesson Koivisto Rune’s approach to the project is some­what surprising. "We design buildings from the inside out," explains principal Eero Koivisto. "The exterior is more or less a product of the interior plans."
The module ends are clad in cedar planks with a gray Swedish vitriol stain.
Oriented to face the west, the interconnected modules fan out to provide three slightly different views of the adjacent gully between two rises in the landscape.
“The name Warp House comes from the challenges of constructing these ‘warped’ modules in comparison to the standard boxes prefabricators normally construct,” note the architects.
The modules “float” above the landscape to minimize site impact.
The client told the architects that she didn’t want any stairs in her new single-story home, which is fitted with an entrance ramp.
Located on a remote and steeply sloped plot in the forest, the Warp House takes cues from Cape Cod’s low-impact, experimental midcentury houses—such as the nearby Hatch Cottage by Jack Hall.
This one-bedroom NODE prefab slots perfectly into a Seattle backyard and produces all of its own energy—with enough leftover to power the neighboring house.
In addition to the workshop, the ground level holds an outdoor shower with easy beach access, a beach equipment storage closet, and a seasonal half bath.
RES4’s modular approach provides a Brooklyn family with a beautiful weatherproof retreat on Long Island. Designed as a hybrid between a double-wide and a courtyard house, the 1,650-square-foot North Fork Bay House was prefabricated off-site as two modules. In addition to time and cost savings, prefabrication helped address the restricted building site, which has a very long and narrow footprint limited by FEMA setback regulations and zoning laws.
The untreated wood will develop a silvery gray patina over time.
The shutters can be opened to allow views and cross breezes through the building.
At the north facade, a series of lapocho wood shutters mitigate solar heat gain in the summer.
The guest houses were prefabricated in a factory, trucked onto the site, and then set on concrete foundations.
The independent modular guest houses give the client the flexibility to expand in the future.
Untreated Lapacho timber planks—the same material used on the main house—clad the exterior of the two guest homes. In contrast to the horizontal cladding of the main house, the planks are vertically oriented here.
Located in the countryside in southern Uruguay, the prefabs overlook a gentle rolling landscape with eucalyptus trees, farm animals, and mountains in the far distance. The owners also have many domestic birds—including swans, peacocks, and ducks that freely roam the site.
Warm, natural cedar is used for the siding, railings, outdoor shower enclosure, and brise-soleil.
Elevated into the trees, the open-plan living area opens up to nature via outdoor decks on either side.
The architects strategically placed the home just north of its neighbors for greater privacy. Set on a very long and narrow site, the home enjoys direct access to Great Peconic Bay with clear views of the water.
The 56-foot home spent three years being used as a trade show prototype by HMK Prefab Homes. The current owners purchased it at the 2014 Dwell on Design conference in Los Angeles.
The town of Vail has enlisted 359 Design's help to produce 32 affordable housing units in the Chamonix Vail project. The modular homes come in five different types and are fabricated in Idaho before being shipped to the site.
Named after its rooftop photovoltaic panels, the Solar Studio is the first completed build in NODE’s customizable Trillium Series.
Ninety-six individual modules were constructed offsite and fully finished before they were assembled on site like stacked LEGO blocks.
The floating suites were prefabricated in a workshop in the Pyrenees to reduce production costs and minimize site impact.
Inspired by LivingHomes’ RK2 model, this custom prefab-hybrid home was created for actor Will Arnett in Beverly Hills.
Plant Prefab was originally established in 2016 as an offshoot of LivingHomes, a design and development company that’s built dozens of award-winning prefabs—including actor Will Arnett's home.
Set amidst the mow eastern mountains of Pueblo Eden, this contemporary home was constructed in four months with a prefab steel-frame system clad in low-maintenance sheet metal.
The DFAB House officially opened its doors at the end of February 2019. Construction began in 2017.
A view of the three-story DFAB House perched atop the NEST Building.
Angled towards the sun, the solar panels meet all of the studio's energy needs with enough energy left over to power the adjacent house.
The inspiration for this prefabricated, modular family home on Fishers Island, New York, were the views that Tanney and Luntz saw from a 12-foot stepladder, which was balancing on the bed of a pickup truck when they first visited the site.
Fast assembly, affordability, and energy efficiency make kit homes a desirable option for homeowners.
Milwaukee studio Vetter Denk Architects designed this eye-catching prefab on the banks of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, as a weekend retreat. 

The home was based on an idea presented by the home's owner, who was inspired by a screw-top jug of $9.99 red wine.
Based in New York City, Cocoon9 takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.