1510 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 25

The east facade reflects a serene late summer morning.
Paths from the house connect to nearby hiking trails for outdoor and wildlife experiences.
The drawn out roof cants upward in the main living spaces to provide them with the best views.
The viewing deck wraps around the home to provide views in every direction.
Snow buries scrub oak trees in front of the home's west elevation.
The home's deck is perched over a canyon full of wildlife and rugged vegetation.
Warm cedar siding contrasts the snow capped ridge on a bright Utah winter day.
One view of the Finn Lofts' southwest corner includes a cut-out rain screen.
The driveway has a permeable surface.
A basic box that’s as tall as it is wide (28 feet) and 16 feet long, this Portland, Oregon house consists of rooms stacked vertically: an unfinished basement on the bottom, a kitchen-living area and a bathroom in the middle, and a bedroom on top, with the stairwell hinged onto the front of the home. The only interior doors are those to the bathroom, basement, and root cellar, leaving the rest of the space open and unfettered. At just 704 square feet, Katherine Bovee and Matt Kirkpatrick's home is a great lesson in making the most out of every inch. Click here to see the interior.
“Initially the design had the studios completely separated from the main house with a sort of breezeway in between,” says Stern, who ultimately decided to physically connect them in a way that evokes walking through the outdoors. “The studios and breezeway are separated from the main house with pocket doors to create privacy when needed, and allow it to function as a separate guest suite for overnight visitors.”
While the home’s simple, boxy forms starkly contrast with surrounding residences, its compact shape and modest scale help it fit into the traditional neighborhood without calling attention to itself. The house was built around a large birch tree, with dwarf fountain grass and porcupine grass planted in front. A weeping blue atlas cedar provides a focal point near the front door.
The larch rainscreen covering the second floor give the house a light appearance and also provides privacy. Though it's difficult for outsiders to look in, the openings between the slats of wood let the family sneak views to the outside.
Minarc’s GRASSsit bar stools, topped with synthetic turf recycled from football fields, sit near the  barbecue.
Front Patio area with reclaimed tobacco storage wood facade
The wooded site allowed for  soaring, curtainless windows that the couple couldn’t have enjoyed downtown.
Theron Humphrey's new home in Nashville, Tenn.
The Shayan House takes full advantage of its canyon site.
The transformed facade features dark gray stained-masonry.
The cantilevered entry court assists with the reinforcement by securing the building’s weight seaward.
The eastern side offers an equally mesmerizing view of Mount Tamalpais, which is lush with foliage throughout the year.
From his perch Dwares can enjoy a glass of wine while gazing at the ocean.
On a sandy cul-de-sac in Stinson Beach, California, architects Matthew Peek and Renata Ancona built an elevated modern structure beside a modest 1940s bungalow.
The master bedroom opens on two sides to the outdoors, where Lockyer placed a custom black-chrome wall clock.
Scrap steel and reclaimed wood clad the three-story triangular tower, which hovers over a small deck and outdoor space.
The building is wrapped in a skin of silvery grey western red cedar. There are no windows visible from the street. The front door is a simple, sliding panel of fiberglass sheeting.
The hardscaping helps keep water use to a minimum. The Lais used gravel—accented by drought-tolerant bamboo—to create their side yard.
Sustainable elements of the home include a geothermal heat pump HVAC system, energy efficient windows and sprayed foam insulation.  The exterior wood is a vertical shiplap siding milled from FSC certified Machiche.  BauLinder Haus was designed to meet and exceed requirements put forward by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for their Indoor airPLUS qualified homes, and is working toward Energy Star qualification.
#sustainable #courtyard #wood #kansascity #baulinderhaus #hufft

Photo credit by Mike Sinclair
The house’s simple form was conceptualized as a series of stacked boxes, with public spaces residing on the ground level and private spaces in the boxes above.  In plan, the boxes are oriented in a u-shape configuration to create a generous private courtyard which was designed as an extension of the interior living space, blurring the boundaries between indoors and out.
#exterior #wood #bauhaus #courtyard #kansascity #baulinderhaus #hufft

Photo credit by Mike Sinclair
Christopher Simmonds Architect left the eastern white cedar untreated in order to allow it to age with the natural elements.
The patio is also equipped with a generous workspace. Bates’s original fenestration, which failed to meet current building code, has been brought up to safety standards by employing the same slatting motif used elsewhere in the house.
Bates Masi’s renovation and expansion of Harry Bates’s 1967 house in Amagansett, New York, salvaged much of the home’s original cypress decking and incorporated subtle additions to the exterior. Because cypress quickly develops a patina, it was only a matter of weeks before the new facade matched the color of the original wood siding. Photo by Raimund Koch.
View of Second Story at the Back
2017 winner The Little House in Seabeck, Washington by MW Works  captures the essence of a cabin in the woods, despite its more generous size.
Front
Front
The building’s south elevation. The lofty double-height balcony, with windows leading into his study, shows how the architects’ break from the triple-decker’s usual horizontality created dramatic results.
Ample windows cut into the north elevation of the Valentine House, behind which live the architects. The openings reveal lofty double-height spaces inside. The ground-floor garage often serves as a shop for architectural model-making.
Porches and rolling glass doors draw in the river breeze to keep the home cool.
“Consistent with the lakefront cabin charm, the owners liked the idea of accessing much of the house from outdoor porches and walkways,” says architect Ted Flato. Supplies from Dynamic Architectural Windows and Doors bring light in to the home’s covered spaces.
In realizing their dream to build a country retreat in upstate New York, Sandy Chilewich and Joe Sultan—proprietors of the textiles firm Chilewich|Sultan—eschewed a mountainous view for an understated wooded plot. At 800 square feet, the flat-roofed home is a modest structure for the expansive 10-acre property.
The Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins in Leadville, Colorado by students at the University of Colorado, College of Architecture and Planning and Colorado Building Workshop was one of 11 projects that were recipients for the Small Projects Award in 2017.
Exterior rear facade with reclaimed Cony Island boardwalk

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.