1510 Exterior Flat Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Just a short walk away from two of Norway’s largest hospitals in Oslo resides a tranquil forest featuring the trickling Sognsvann Creek. It’s in this lush oasis that Norwegian architectural and design firm Snøhetta has built the Outdoor Care Retreat, associated with the Friluftssykehuset Foundation. The project allows nature to provide a healing respite for patients who’ve been kept in isolation. For that purpose, the interiors have been left relatively bare, in stark contrast to the crowded, tall hospital buildings they’re associated with.
Architects Melissa and Jacob Brillhart wanted a home that took advantage of a lush lot and minimized any impact on the landscape. Drawing on principles of tropical modernism and the dogtrot model, the couple designed and built a simple, practical structure that is rich in cultural meaning. "There is something to be said for living in a glass house totally surrounded by nature," says Melissa. "I can't put my finger on it, but it has an impact on how I feel. It just isn’t the same experience as living in a house with traditional punched openings."
A massive oak tree is the focal point of the communal entry courtyard. The apartments were originally designed by Harwell Hamilton Harris for Thomas Cranfill, an English
professor at The University of Texas at Austin courtyard.
Hoffman enjoys the deck she built on the house's front facade.
Hinged doors on the house's exterior fold open to reveal more storage space.
Mariah Hoffman stands in the doorway of the 156-square-foot home she designed and built for herself.
The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
The Goya House is broken down into a series of pavilions, including a separate master suite (seen at left) connected by a glass bridge.
The house's front door, tucked under one of many cantilevering portions of the roof, comes after passing through an interior courtyard. "It’s not just an axial arrival to the front door," says Wright. "You come in and shift to the right, and cross a small bridge over the entry water feature. Those little shifts [help] guide a visitor to see these different points of view."
Designed by Austin, Texas–based studio Andersson-Wise Architects, the 12,500-square-foot Stone Creek Camp is sited on a sloping hill whose topography guides visitors to discover the grounds slowly: from the gatehouse to the master house, main lodge, and guesthouse. The eco-friendly family retreat features a stacked wood facade that was built from fallen trees found on the site; a sod green roof that provides insulation; and regionally sourced construction materials—including stone, wood, windows, and doors.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
The Coronado district near downtown Phoenix has an eclectic mix of home styles, ranging from 1930s Craftsman bungalows to modest brick colonials to small midcentury ranches. Lately, a growing number of glass-and-stucco minimalist newcomers are joining the mix—including several designed by Joel Contreras, a local real estate agent turned architectural designer whose family has lived in the area for five generations.
All of the labor and materials to build the homes were graciously donated, meaning that the design couldn't be too extravagant and work well with the given materials. Community First! wanted each home to feel warm and welcoming, but also be relatively maintenance-free.
"The main issue with site planning is the units are relatively dense out there," Taylor says. "The building has to take advantage of sun orientation and seasonal breezes, but also have privacy. This site, in particular, was also next to a swale so there are many insects during the summer months."
Community First! has anchored itself within the community through partnerships with various businesses, other nonprofits, faith organizations, and local schools, offering its residents opportunities for success in every aspect of their lives.
This single-family residence in Bloomfield, Michigan, known as the Treehaus, embodies the iconic style of midcentury modernism. Thanks to a thoughtful renovation, this rare dwelling has been restored to its original state of refined elegance.
"When you pull up to the garage doors, you intuitively know where the front door is, but there's nothing that says entrance," he says. "Instead we did it through the landscaping and architecture."
In the evening, the slats reveal a glow from within, giving the project its name, Lantern Studio.
The screen stops short of the frame’s end. “We wanted to peel it back, so you could see the steel beneath,” says Flavin.
A Cor-Ten steel planter running along one side is filled with Carex Ice Dance. “The plantings are minimalist, yet rich in color and texture,” says landscape architect H. Keith Wagner. The wood planters on the top level were custom designed by Kelton Woodwork.
The relatively discreet exterior, clad in cedar slats, belies the risks taken within. “We wanted to do a facade that didn’t give too much away,” says Ogrydziak. The street-facing windows are by Blomberg.
At night, the home glows in the middle of the Norwegian wilderness.
Wide stairs lead to an open veranda that divides the family wing from the guest quarters. In another nod to rural Scandinavian style, the roof is covered in sod. “When the grass waves in the wind, it softens the rectilinear nature of the house,” says Casper.
The house is raised on columns to improve sight lines, keep snow drifts at bay, and lessen the building’s impact on the land.
Borrowing from the local vernacular, they clad the structure in skigard, a split-rail construction traditionally used for farm fences.
Designer couple Casper and Lexie Mork-Ulnes created a rustic retreat for their family on a mountaintop 45 minutes from Lillehammer, Norway.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
For sustainability, the Canopy House features a steel structure system and extensive masonry finishes to ensure durability and low maintenance needs. Likewise, the landscaping features xeriscaping and native plants.
On the site's southwest side, the second canopy structure atop the guest suite features deep overhangs to shelter the pool and lawn from the intense setting sun.
"The canopy structure was carefully edited down to only its essential parts," explain the architects. "Every component was designed so that each member is purposeful and is exactly the size and shape it needs to be and no more. The fabrication and assembly process was fully considered to allow for straightforward construction."
The west-facing outdoor patio is protected by deep roof overhangs lined with southern yellow pine.
Ipe decking connects the main house to the rear guest suite/pool house and pool, which were strategically placed to take advantage of natural shade conditions.
The view from outside the entrance gate, which was constructed from steel with welded wire infill. The entry path was made of Leuders limestone, the same material used on the outdoor patios and fireplace.
In response to a geotechnical report that revealed poor soils, the architects deepened the piers to support a structure slab that floats eight inches above grade. The unusual foundation design allows the elevated home to sit very close to the trees without negatively impacting the root systems.
Located in the heart of the city, the property "provided the best of both worlds," explain the couple, who were drawn to its location and its many mature trees that created the feeling of being immersed in nature.
A sitting area in the front yard encourages neighbors to stop by for a chat.
The Coles and their children love hitting the beach, just four blocks away.
Landscape designer Kenneth Philip worked with mwworks to fill in the forested setting.
The home features a flat roofline, and it’s composed of stained red cedar, concrete, and basalt—materials that weather well and blend seamlessly with the land.
Pacific Coast architect Paul Kirk initially embraced the International Style but went on to forge his own version of regional modernism, using natural materials and a more contextual approach to site and setting. The Dowell Residence in Seattle displays a sensitive approach to its site and a sophisticated use of materials as well as spatial dexterity. The house largely turns its back on the street but opens up dramatically to the gardens to one side, taking advantage of the shifting topography to slot in a lower level that connects with the outdoors.
Homes in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park vary in style. "There's a Spanish-style country club, and if you were to ride your bike around the neighborhood, there are beautiful Southwestern, midcentury, and modern homes with oversized lots."
“The clients wanted a house that blended into nature,” notes Berensson.
The weeHouse has also been applied to a new, housing-for-the-homeless prototypes designed for the Envision Community Group in Minneapolis.
The home's green roof is an ode to the life of Arango's grandmother.
The compact residence, sided with tarred pine and glass, is surrounded by the Andes mountains.
Architect Alfonso Arango designed a 258-square-foot retreat with a green roof on the property of his childhood home in La Calera, Colombia.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.