115 Exterior Flat Roofline Stucco Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The Coronado district near downtown Phoenix has an eclectic mix of home styles, ranging from 1930s Craftsman bungalows to modest brick colonials to small midcentury ranches. Lately, a growing number of glass-and-stucco minimalist newcomers are joining the mix—including several designed by Joel Contreras, a local real estate agent turned architectural designer whose family has lived in the area for five generations.
Clarissa and Peter live in one of the units and plan to rent the second unit, which is almost a mirror image of the first.
A concrete walkway leads to their home, which is painted in a custom white and gray stucco. The lighting is by Modern Form.
The pared-back approach of the remodel begins with the front entry, where horizontal bands of orange-toned cedar were replaced with a refined wood screen.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
Below, the terrain falls away steeply to a public hike-and-bike trail before meeting the shores of Lady Bird Lake, itself a segment of the Colorado River that winds across the state of Texas.
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
Most of the year, the family keep the sliding glass doors—which span 16 feet from the living room to the exterior deck—of their Tampa dwelling open, giving it the aura of a Sarasota Modern home. Stunning cantilevered overhangs, in the spirit of Paul Rudolph's Umbrella House, help tame the sun.
The home’s namesake is a 26-foot-tall shade structure called a ramada. The name derives from the Spanish word for ‘branches,’ and it’s a regional construction technique mastered by the Tohono O'odha tribe. A total of 20 Douglas fir telephone poles support the 2 x 4 lattice canopy, which provides shade and casts dramatic shadows across the white, mortar-washed slump blocks.
Clustered around a sunny courtyard, Three Piece House’s three volumes—a main house, comprising two volumes (one for living and the other for sleeping) connected via a sun-soaked reading corridor, and a free-standing guest studio—are oriented for optimal passive solar conditions, including access to cooling ocean breezes. Recycled brick paving ties the volumes together. Located in the garden, the studio accommodates visiting friends, family, and guests.
In Austin, Texas, this 1,100-square-foot accessory dwelling unit, called The Chelsea, splits a lot with the main house. The ADU responds to the lot by dodging the heritage trees to the north while creating a very spacious front yard. There is a garage that blocks a dogtrot and the living area of the house from the setting sun; the larger windows are concentrated on the northern side of the lot for plenty of natural lighting while reducing the heat gain in the summer and encouraging passive cross-ventilation.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
The second floor houses a 900-square-foot apartment that can be kept separate from the main floor residence for rental purposes or can be connected via a door. "In what had been an attic for storing fan belts and auto supplies, we created a large open apartment with full bath and kitchen," says McCuen.
The town of Vail has enlisted 359 Design's help to produce 32 affordable housing units in the Chamonix Vail project. The modular homes come in five different types and are fabricated in Idaho before being shipped to the site.
Wide glass apertures connect the living and dining room to the new backyard.
A front view of the renovated home. The wood slats screening the bedrooms on the street-facing side are repeated indoors on the interior staircase.
“It’s a great little place—a throwback to the old days of California coastal communities,” says Montalba.
The gabled entry features a patterned, wood rainscreen that evokes the forked ribs of the Saguaro cactus while the recessed entry is akin to a Saguaro boot, the holes in the giant cacti that many desert animals use as their homes.
The house draws its name, “Pleats,” from the corrugated metal that wraps the gabled volume, reminiscent of the pleated exterior of the Saguaro cactus.
The recessed entry features a disguised door for guests
A disguised door for guests
Mesa Contemporary is highlighted by several interesting details, including large second-story cantilevers, exterior elevations built entirely of glass, and a view of Santa Barbara from every room. A clearstory window system gives the appearance of a roof that floats on top of the elegant structure below.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
A larger Lindsey Adelman chandelier hangs in the foyer, located off the double-height entryway.
Luigi Rosselli Architects used sliding perforated plywood shutters on the addition at the back of the house to create a contemporary look while also letting in light.
In addition to the home’s interior goals, the exterior was transformed with a modern facade.
Simple in form, but built of multiple layers, this contemporary home plays with light, function, and form.
The 1000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The façade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” said Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
A detail of the façade shows the combination of materials and textural contrasts. Metal accents mix with Cumaru slats, measuring 1x4, at the upper level, and grey stucco at the lower level.
The 1,000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The facade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” says Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it, and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
The project's prime, corner lot real estate dictated the organization of the separate living quarters. The main house's driveway and entryway, for example, are located on Maude Street, giving permanent residents a sense of privacy.
Spacious windows and a slotted facade provide curbside appeal at every angle.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
New concrete stairs, interspersed with Ipe decking, visually connect with the house.
The architects created an entry vestibule by reorienting the front door.
The team took the home down to the foundation and rebuilt on the existing footprint, which is composed of three wings: one that houses the living and dining spaces, one that includes the kitchen and family room, and a third that contains the master suite. The new facade combines Western Red Cedar for the siding, vertical slats, and roof fascia with white cement plaster accents.
“Great care was taken to preserve all fir and maple trees on the site and to compliment the new landscaped areas to highlight the natural setting,” the architects note of their site-sensitive approach.
The contemporary home is marked by long horizontal planes and clean lines. Giulietti Schouten Architects crafted it with an eye for timeless design.
A true “forested retreat,” the home is accessed via a private entry road through the woods.
If the ground floor free area constitutes an open but intimate area (closed from the street and surrounding views), the terrace in the upper floor creates a relation between the house and the landscape.
TThe first modern construction in historic Hyde Park, the forward-thinking residence unabashedly volunteers a fresh point of view in the architectural dialogue of the neighborhood.
The home's dramatic eastern elevation asserts a more commanding presence with expansive glazing on both levels, boldly "opening up" to visitors and passersby.
Situated on a corner lot with two "front yards," the home is uniquely positioned to make distinctive statements from each street-facing vantage point. The home's southern entry features modest glazing and warm, cedar accents.
The home's horizontal massing, tastefully in rhythm with the neighborhood, complements the scale of existing homes in the historic enclave.
A "grand oak," one of seven mature oak trees dotted around the property, towers majestically  over the home. This tree, vehemently protected by the city, would play a prominent role in site planning.
The newly constructed residence was built on the old home's footprint. By expanding vertically, the family was able to gain about 1,000 square feet of living space, increasing interior living area from 2,000 to 3,000 square feet.
Mount Pleasant Modern: Front Elevation
Mount Pleasant Modern: Main Entry
The geometrically disciplined facade is composed of blonde cypress, white stucco, and cedar that was charred black by Delta Millworks.
Previously, the home had been "a dim, dark, clunky disaster that had been built apparently in direct opposition to light patterns and to views of the lake," says Buhler. Now, the renovated home takes proper advantage of its lakeside setting.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.