39 Exterior Curved Roofline Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

The cabin and back deck are cantilevered over a slope in the property.
Oasis Tiny House, clad in teal-painted plywood and a metal roof that's pitched in the front and curved in the rear, was designed and built by Ellie and Dan Madsen of Paradise Tiny Homes in Keaau, Hawaii.
One of the tenets of Treebones Resort is to build shelters that perch lightly on the land. The Autonomous Tent doesn't require a foundation, instead resting on a deck that is held to the ground with screws.
The rear of the home faces the forest, and a wall of firewood creates a sense of seclusion. Operable windows allow for passive ventilation on the upper and lower floors.
Powers clad the exterior in western red cedar shingles, knowing that they would age gracefully over the years with minimal upkeep. They provide texture and pattern to the roof and exterior walls, which merge at the home’s apex.
The home is surrounded on three sides by forest, and its most prominent facade faces the water. Its unique acorn shape efficiently sheds rain and snow, and creates an architecturally interesting interior space.
Musician and interior designer August Hausman lives in a restored 1968 Airstream Land Yacht that once belonged to his father.
The cabin's curved zinc shell exudes a rugged, industrial look.
Located in the woods of Malborghetto Valbruna in the Italian Dolomite commune of Tarvisio, this egg-shaped tree house appears to hover in midair like a giant pinecone.
A north-facing veranda includes an outdoor seating area adjacent to a stone fire pit.
Fabshack is designed to be adaptive to many different site configurations. In this instance, it nestles into a rock outcropping on the architect’s property northwest of Sydney.
Kitty Mrache stands in front of the Mushroom Dome Cabin, which continues to hold the title as Airbnb's most popular rental, as confirmed in Airbnb's press release celebrating the company's milestone for half a billion guest arrivals.
Hexagonal and pentagonal panels come together to form this cabin’s oblong envelope. The unique architectural skin mimics the rock formations that surround it.
Tucked away on the edge of a small lake surrounded by mountains and topped off with a grass-covered roof, this hunting cabin designed by Snøhetta is made with locally sourced stones.
Italian prefab company LEAPfactory built this alpine shelter off-site and had it flown in via helicopter. Cantilevered off the edge of a mountain, the structure features a living room, a dine-in kitchen, bunk beds, storage closets, and an integrated computer to keep mountaineers and climbers up-to-date on the weather conditions.
Designed by Bureau A, Antoine is a bivouac in Les Ruinettes, Switzerland that closely resembles a rock in the snow. The shelter is named after the main character Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz's novel, Derborence. In the story, Antoine survives seven weeks under the rocks before he manages to return to his village and life.
Skylodge Adventure Suites are luxury dwellings affixed to the mountainside in Peru's Sacred Valley, approximately nine miles north of Cusco. Visitors interested in staying at Skylodge must climb a quarter of a mile of protected trails and fly through the sky on zip lines.
The Gouter Refuge is located at 12,582 feet in elevation (about 3,280 feet below the summit of Mont Blanc) along the Gouter route. The four-story, rounded structure juts out over a 4,921-foot drop, and it's the last stop before the final climb to the summit of Mont Blanc. Commissioned by the French Alpine Club and designed by Swiss architect Hervé Dessimoz, the wooden structure is clad in stainless steel and took five years to design and three years to build.
The Hammerfest Cabin is perched high atop a rocky slope.
The small cabin's cross-laminated timber (CLT) shell, composed of 72 unique wooden panels, is designed to withstand severe arctic storms and heavy wind conditions.
While perched at the peak of the mountain, adventurous travelers are rewarded with unparalleled views of the region's breathtaking natural scenery.
“We are delighted to see that our ambition to create this innovative sanctuary for adventurers has been realized,” says James Dodson of SPINN Architects. “We hope that the cabin will continue to be enjoyed and will encourage more people to visit the stunning location in the future.”
The Hammerfest Cabin is the first of several concept cabins in an innovative series. The second cabin, planned for late 2019, will be built on Tyven—a mountain on the other side of Hammerfest.
The overall construction cost of the Hammerfest Cabin was about €100,000, including many hours of volunteer work.
The cabin's faceted, geometric shell is specifically designed to withstand harsh weather conditions. The structure underwent rigorous wind and snow simulations before any construction on the mountain began.
The unique geometric design was the result of both aesthetic and functional considerations. The bold, eye-catching cabin has already become an attraction in of itself among travelers in the region.
Organic pentagonal and hexagonal panels, varying in size, come together to form the cabin's exterior envelope.
Over time, Kebony develops a silver-grey natural patina with exposure to sun and moisture. The metallic sheen is similar in appearance to the natural rock formations which surround the cabin.
The exterior cladding is made of Kebony, a sustainable treated wood product. The company uses heat and natural chemicals to give softwoods, such as pine, enhanced strength and durability. The timber product is sustainably sourced and nearly maintenance-free—a huge benefit in an environment where weathering and wear can be drastic.
Fitting in seamlessly with the fabric of the natural landscape, the cabin makes a modest impact in scale, while providing a functional benefit to travelers in the region.
The Bjellandsbu, a 376-square-foot hunting cabin located in western Norway. Designed by Snøhetta, Photo by James Silverman  #cabin #prefab #norway #horse #grassroof #snow
Mill Valley Cabins
Mill Valley Cabins
The green-roofed studio was reinforced to support the weight of wet soils.
Modern yurts haven’t abandoned this consideration of the spiritual—just ask Adrian Larralde, an entrepreneur who designed and built a mountaintop yurt just outside Santa Barbara, California. Now available to rent through Glamping Hub, the yurt began as a personal project. Entranced by yurts and the serene experience of being in them, Larralde enlisted his father, a general contractor, to help build one on the family’s site on Refugio Mountain, overlooking the Channel Islands. The area, Larralde says, boasts a rich history.
AO, Alpine Shelter “Bivak II na Jezerih”
Airbnb's fourth

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.