24 Exterior Butterfly Roofline Metal Siding Material House Design Photos And Ideas

The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
At first glance, the structure appears to be a single-story home. The surrounding trees create additional privacy as the yard begins to slope toward the rear.
Within this home, vaulted skylights are carved within the original roof, expanding several spaces to the sky. The two-story pavilion is swathed in natural materials like wood and stone paired with inky hues for a soothing, modern palette.
Set on a forested hillside, the home feels completely secluded. The closest neighboring house is 500 feet away and out of sight.
A 100-mile drive from the Big Apple, the 15-acre property in Orient, New York, serves as a vacation retreat and refuge for a Brooklyn couple.
Priced at $419,9000, The Cocoa Beach is a three-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath residence of 1,560 square feet. It boasts a striking butterfly standing-seam metal roof and exterior stonework.
The jagged edges of the roof are meant to resemble the surrounding peaks of the Cascades. The exterior HardiePanel vertical siding is painted “dark pewter” by Benjamin Moore.
"Exterior materials include black anodized-aluminum windows, stained western red cedar, and pre-painted metal siding," Parish says. "These materials complement the new modern volume of the house, while also nodding to the existing character of the neighborhood."
A look at the interior-to-exterior connections across a concrete terrace to the landscaped rear.
A peek at the northern interior-to-exterior connections via a covered terrace with its cantilevered edge and sculpted step element, doubling as seats for enjoyment of the garden.
Wall, roof, and floor planes extend the envelope at the rear to form a covered terrace, which also improves privacy from adjacent neighbors and strengthens connection to the home's external environment.
The decidedly nontraditional structure includes a front wall that opens the living room onto the front yard—and to the rest of the neighborhood, which has enthusiastically welcomed the house and its owner.
Terrace
The house and its surrounding
Front facade of the house
The bedroom pavilion is mostly hidden, thanks to a massive native California oak—part of a grove. “That’s the good thing about oaks—they keep their leaves in the winter, so you don’t have one view in the summer and another in the winter,” Suzanne says.
More native grasses set the tone near the generously sized concrete pavers leading to the entrance. “We didn’t want the planting to feel like a country cottage garden—that would have felt disconnected with the view behind it,” Trainor says.
Butterfly House, designed by Feldman Architecture for David and Suzanne Rinaldo in California’s Monterey County, is made up of three discrete structures separated by walkways. The distinct folds in the roofs are utilized for rainwater catchment.
Set on five acres, the three pavilions total 2,900 square feet. They gently fan out in a semicircle “like the charms on a necklace,” Suzanne says. The pair recruited landscape designer Bernard Trainor to help integrate the house with the land.
"Pulling the buildings apart allows what is not a big house to feel really big," says architect Jonathan Feldman of the sustainable retirement home he built for a couple in California. "Because of the ways it opens up, it feels much more expansive than it really is."