81 Exterior Shingles Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

A family in Hamburg, Germany, turned a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a few exterior tricks, including sheathing the exterior in one-dimensional, murdered-out black.
A family of cost-conscious Hamburgers converted a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a strict budget in place. To unite the quaint masonry of the original villa with the squat, ugly add-on built flush against it, the architects decided to paint the old-fashioned facade graphite gray and then covered the box next door in plain, light-colored larch. Photo by Mark Seelen.
While the slate-clad northern facade has few windows and a steeply pitched roof, the southern facade is dominated by glass with the solar-panel-clad roof strategically angled to catch the sun.
The home is divided into two floors: seen here is the second floor, where the bedrooms enjoy private balconies and ocean views. The shared spaces, such as the living room and kitchen, are below.
exterior
Anthony Belluschi, the son of architect Pietro Belluschi (1899-1994), refurbished his father’s 1938 Sutor House with the help of general contractor Pat Kirkhuff. A top priority for the new owners, Aric Wood and Erin Graham, was to unearth the neglected gardens, which were inspired by Jiro Harada, an authority on Japanese landscaping.
With the aid of landscaper Takashi Fukuda and the home’s original plans, the residents are gradually reclaiming the multileveled site.  The 2,300-square-foot home’s overhangs shelter its porches (opposite, far right).
Though the lane on which the Japanese House sits is off the main street, a rock wall affords the small yard quite a bit of privacy. It also nicely frames the second floor of the house from street level. Have a look at the traditional architecture nearby in the reflection in the corner window.
The framed aluminum of the corner window by Natralight breaks up the roof of recycled slate tiles, which is entirely of a piece with the roofs around it. The Scottish oak cladding comes from Abbey Timber and the black aluminum cladding from MSP Scotland.
To provide maxizing privacy and natural light penetration for their clients, Belgium-based DMVA Architects created a frontage composed of “knitted” bricks, which bring light and air into the home.
Exterior
A new cedar deck and facade face drought-tolerant plants and a gravel hardscape, implemented by Cheng with help from Indra Designs.
Exterior
Rear facade
One of the local smokehouses, which served as inspiration for the house's massing
“I didn’t want the kind of manicured garden that would mean I’d have to come out on weekends and mow the lawn,” says Jean-Baptiste Barache of the country home he built, mostly by himself, over a year and a half.
The newly built house, just feet from the water’s edge, occupies the space where a decaying farmhouse once stood.
The red chimney and strategic diagonals throw accents against the simple silhouette.
Stringent building regulations didn’t cramp the designers’ style. Sharp angles, tall windows, and varied material textures left room to make a striking architectural statement.
When the shutters are closed, the house assumes an introverted character.
West Elevation - Mirror and Hemp Shake Siding
An artist by trade, and gardener by passion, Allison Paschke commissioned Providence-based architecture firm 3SIXØ to build a modest cottage that would allow her to reconnect with nature. She landscaped the home’s lush gardens herself.
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
A wooden home nestled amongst a cluster of Japanese larch trees offers a perfect sanctuary from nearby Tokyo. Chubu, Japan. By Koji Tsutsui & Associates from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
This RIBA award-winning house by Platform 5 Architects has three shingle-clad pitch roof bays that are influenced by Scandinavian lake houses and echoes the form of the local boat sheds.
Even the pool is the result of mixed influences: Andrew wanted a series of shallow, gently sloping hangout zones; his wife, Amy, a former competitive swimmer, needed a full lane deep enough for laps.
The winglike dips in the roofline situate and hold the house against the region’s brutal winds. As the outdoor chairs attest, lifestyles here pass easily between inside and out; a long hike and a good swim are always just steps away
Jaanus Orgusaar's NOA cabin in the Virumaa region of Estonia is currently used as a summer cottage.
Jaanus Orgusaar's NOA cabin in the Virumaa region of Estonia.
On a sloping site near a defunct rock quarry on the remote lobster-fishing island of Vinalhaven, Maine, a three-part summer home overlooks a framed view of Penobscot Bay. Working around the site’s unique topography, design-build firm GO Logic created each structure at varying elevations.
The west side is clad with six shutters made of horizontal, western red cedar slats that can be opened or closed with a single movement. "We wanted it to be able to feel cozy when needed," Oostenbruggen says.
The house may appear conventional at a glance, but a closer look shows how Oostenbruggen has pushed the boundaries of the traditional gabled typology. It has an asymmetrical roof, with slate shingles that extend down the eastern side to close it off completely.
superrkül dubbed this project the Stealth Cabin because it's hidden in the landscape and will continue to recede in view over time. Photo by Shai Gil.
Photography by Matthew Millman
this is the South facing front of the home
this is the North facing side of the home
the back east facing side of the house
The exterior of the new, two-story home in East Austin, Texas was designed with a minimal palette, bronze windows, and steel details in order to blend into the existing cityscape.
Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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