194 Exterior Metal Roof Material Wood Siding Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

In Texas, where everything is bigger, Ryan McLaughlin is placing his bets on something small. Specifically, a simple 160-square-foot cabin that he hopes city-dwellers will book to get away, find some focus, and reconnect with nature. The result is a laidback, pitched-roof cabin in which every inch of space is thoughtfully allotted so that guests can spend the maximum amount of time outdoors. "Most tiny homes you see essentially replicate a normal house and downsize everything," says Ryan. "We wanted to work our way from the inside out."
Street View
Innauer Matt Architekten designed the house as simple wooden building resting atop a solid, reinforced concrete plinth.
Designed by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter for a family of four, the Split View Mountain Lodge is a holiday home near the village of Geilo, Norway. The main volume splits out to form additional annexes that frame individual views of the surrounding mountains.
Ryan McLaughlin watches the sunset from the deck of the 160-square-foot tiny home he built, with no prior experience, at his parents’ horse ranch in Georgetown, Texas. Soon, the trailer-mounted cabin will be moved to a vineyard, where it will operate grid-free and be available to rent for short stays.
A fiberglass door covers a void in the wall that holds a solar-powered water heater, a propane tank, and wood for a fire bowl.
The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo.
The back of the home and gable ends are covered in blackened cedar.
Inspired by the Scandinavian barn vernacular, this Upcountry Maui cottage provides a peaceful retreat for family gatherings.
Four bedrooms and four bathrooms span two structures, with a guest wing and main residence. The Aspen, Colorado, home is 4,300 square feet.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
The entry is hidden and only discoverable through a pathway that leads to a red sculpture. It's the only part of the palette that breaks the rules of the monochromatic cloaked facade.
The program is pushed to the property edges to screen adjacent neighbors and directs framed views to a large central courtyard.
Enough House by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects resides on Brian MacKay Lyons' Shobac farm in Nova Scotia, a campus that allows the firm to experiment with form, materiality, and building. The Cor-Ten steel cabin, which features exposed Douglas fir plywood sheathing and stained pine flooring inside, houses an intern architect.
The base of this cabin is constructed out of cast-in-place concrete with formwork using the same wood as the floor cladding above.
Stairway to Heaven is located on the clients' parents' land, just steps away from the homeowner's childhood home. Two siblings were also building homes on the property, making it a true family compound. The architects were mindful to create a home that utilized the views, but also allowed for privacy between residents.
Oozing with charm, comfort, and modern amenities, these 10 micro homes are eagerly awaiting to help you experience the tiny house lifestyle. But brace yourself—you might become an aspiring tiny-house dweller after just one stay.
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
Available for as low as $55,000, the Artist Bothy is a multipurpose, prefab hut designed to promote a creative spark in residents.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
A view of the back side of the two-story home reveals its dramatic glazing, which provides both levels with far-flung views into the site.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
The trailer is set on wheels, so the home is easily relocatable, and can be registered as a caravan.  A power drill winds the slide-out inward and outward.
The Sojourner tiny house was built atop a high-quality, galvanized trailer chassis.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Ombre siding on rear
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
A shark-skinning shack.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
Anka Lamprecht and Lukas Wezel shared their rustic domicile in a valley in Grotli, Norway. Boasting an enviable view, it’s the first cabin archived in the book’s “Backcountry” category that features homesteads in the wilderness.
On a sloping site near a defunct rock quarry on the remote lobster-fishing island of Vinalhaven, Maine, a three-part summer home overlooks a framed view of Penobscot Bay. Working around the site’s unique topography, design-build firm GO Logic created each structure at varying elevations.
The facade consists of exposed concrete, Galvalume roofing, and cedar or torrefied wood coating. The homes are carefully positioned to keep other structures out of sight.
Australian spotted gum wood was used for sections of the exterior wall.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
"The roof that connects the two volumes makes it possible to use the patio even when it rains or when the dew settles," note the architects. "This way the house is adapted for Swedish summer— it works in all kinds of weather."
The timber decking that connects the existing cottage to the new volumes emphasizes indoor-outdoor living.
The volume that extends toward the south of the site (to the right of the central volume) also contains two bedrooms.
The house is clad in vertical planks of black-painted fir.
A place of unspoilt nature, the island property spans approximately 1.6 acres.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
The exterior door adds a pop of color to the white and gray facade.
Steel columns echo the Norwegian folk form.
The house features a simple gable roof.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.