154 Exterior Metal Roof Material Wood Siding Material House Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

A fiber cement “wrapper” clads the addition and the renovated home, which now totals 3,300 square feet. A translucent plexiglass canopy defines the new glassed entry. The front right corner, finished with contrasting local Atlantic white cedar, denotes a work room that serves the storage purposes of the previous garage.
Tru Form Tiny merged two of their standard models and then further customized the exterior with paneling and tight knot cedar. They also added Galvalume roofing and a removable awning.
"The wood exterior was selected to make the house blend in with the landscape," Troyer says. "I wanted something that didn’t require painting and aged in a way that would provide a degree of richness. " He envisioned a garden that better surrounded the home, and a more modern exterior. He used ash wood slates of various dimensions from Thermory USA, which were heat-treated for a more sustainable finish.
Casita 850 by Ma Modular
This "local prefab" home on the Isle of Skye is made mostly from materials sourced in northern Scotland. The timber-framed model, meant to evoke the simple agrarian barns of the area, can be constructed on-site in as little as a day and is designed for affordability.
Sculptor Lia Harmsen rents the dwelling to guests whenever she travels.
Orchard House is a modern interpretation of the Californian farmhouse. Cary Bernstein Architect thoughtfully integrated architectural and landscape elements that mirror the neutral palette of the surrounding countryside.
A sky-lit window brightens the sleeping loft.
Street View
Innauer Matt Architekten designed the house as simple wooden building resting atop a solid, reinforced concrete plinth.
Designed by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter for a family of four, the Split View Mountain Lodge is a holiday home near the village of Geilo, Norway. The main volume splits out to form additional annexes that frame individual views of the surrounding mountains.
The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo.
The back of the home and gable ends are covered in blackened cedar.
Inspired by the Scandinavian barn vernacular, this Upcountry Maui cottage provides a peaceful retreat for family gatherings.
Four bedrooms and four bathrooms span two structures, with a guest wing and main residence. The Aspen, Colorado, home is 4,300 square feet.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
The entry is hidden and only discoverable through a pathway that leads to a red sculpture. It's the only part of the palette that breaks the rules of the monochromatic cloaked facade.
The program is pushed to the property edges to screen adjacent neighbors and directs framed views to a large central courtyard.
Enough House by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects resides on Brian MacKay Lyons' Shobac farm in Nova Scotia, a campus that allows the firm to experiment with form, materiality, and building. The Cor-Ten steel cabin, which features exposed Douglas fir plywood sheathing and stained pine flooring inside, houses an intern architect.
The base of this cabin is constructed out of cast-in-place concrete with formwork using the same wood as the floor cladding above.
Stairway to Heaven is located on the clients' parents' land, just steps away from the homeowner's childhood home. Two siblings were also building homes on the property, making it a true family compound. The architects were mindful to create a home that utilized the views, but also allowed for privacy between residents.
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
A view of the back side of the two-story home reveals its dramatic glazing, which provides both levels with far-flung views into the site.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
The facade consists of exposed concrete, Galvalume roofing, and cedar or torrefied wood coating. The homes are carefully positioned to keep other structures out of sight.
Australian spotted gum wood was used for sections of the exterior wall.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
"The roof that connects the two volumes makes it possible to use the patio even when it rains or when the dew settles," note the architects. "This way the house is adapted for Swedish summer— it works in all kinds of weather."
The timber decking that connects the existing cottage to the new volumes emphasizes indoor-outdoor living.
The volume that extends toward the south of the site (to the right of the central volume) also contains two bedrooms.
The house is clad in vertical planks of black-painted fir.
A place of unspoilt nature, the island property spans approximately 1.6 acres.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
The exterior door adds a pop of color to the white and gray facade.
Steel columns echo the Norwegian folk form.
The house features a simple gable roof.
A splash band of black Richlite wraps the base of the building to protect the timber siding from the snow and rain.
A collage of brightly colored, geometric volumes comprise the Ettore Sottsass–designed residence of Lesley Bailey and Adrian Olabuenaga, proprietors of jewelry and accessories company ACME Studio. Completed in 1997, this home is one of few private commissions designed by the Italian architect, who passed away in 2007.
The attention to detail extends to the design of the home's streamlined contemporary gutters.
A look at the dramatic slice in the roof, which provides an exciting intersection between modernism and the vernacular design.
The gable-ended structures reference the agrarian history of the site. Each roof is supported by dark timber and steel trusses, inspired by the property’s existing hay barn.
Nestled between sprawling trees, the property sits on the valley floor, leaving a courtyard space with a pool in the center.
In summer, the living area is surrounded by grass that covers the terrain. Yet, once winter comes, this same area appears to be nestled within a blanket of snow.
The home has warm interiors throughout and boasts a minimalist, cabin-like aesthetic.
A hidden portal steel frame provides strong support.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.