317 Exterior Metal Roof Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The chalet is built entirely out of Jura forest Fir wood planks.
The large, sliding doors pocket into the deep stone walls, completely opening up the living space to the outdoors.
A simple composition in form, but intelligent in detail and execution, the peaked-roof dwelling is a stunning wood- and stone-clad living space.
The award-winning tiny house builder ESCAPE has recently unveiled the first phase of Canoe Bay ESCAPE Village—a tiny home resort community in Northwest Wisconsin.
The exterior siding is in a traditional board and batten style, then accented with a steel roof and windows.
The couple wanted the cabin to mesh with its beautiful natural surroundings. "To us this meant small," says Kenny. "We wanted the design to put you right into the landscape, and by making it small we feel drawled by the night sky and mountains that surround us."
Trout Lake | Olson Kundig
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
Exterior of Pink House from the street. The entryway is recessed to enhance the spatial notion of soild and void.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
The house has a standing-seam metal roof, and a fully operable roof skylight.
To add more headroom to the sleeping lofts, the family opted for expanded dormers.
The family wanted a room on the main floor that could serve as an office and playroom. They also desired their home to include two sleeping lofts, rather than just one.
Generous balconies reach back into the surrounding forest at every level.
The roof overhang is painted white to bounce more light indoors.
A short set of stairs leads up to the glazed entrance of the Week’nder.
The three-bedroom home's gabled roof mimics the shape of a tent.
The Week’nder was constructed from two prefabricated modules.
The exterior is coated in Sherwin Williams Solid Wood stain.
The poured concrete foundation is clearly visible when viewing the back of the home.
Fishbeyn and Wright love that their home is set in a natural landscape with an incredible mountain view.
Jamie and Ingrid stained the timber facade a dark blackish-brown to blend the shack into the landscape, but kept the window frames white for a stark pop of contrast.
Riffing on local farmhouses, architects Patrick Walker and Elizabeth Demetriades covered the 4,000-square-foot house in rough-sawn red cedar and capped it with a standing-seam galvalume roof.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Exposed concrete walls provide thermal mass and protection from wildland fires.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
The home is made up of four gabled forms: the main house—with an attached master bedroom suite in its own distinct volume (on the left)—an artist studio, and an attached three-car garage.
Lightweight corrugated zinc roof sheeting clads the exterior.
David Ferguson of Kimo Estate took construction into his own hands in a two-person owner-builder team.
The living space extends to a protected outdoor terrace.
The house is accessed via an external staircase built of wood and wrought iron.
The home draws inspiration from the Villa Girasole, a rotating home built in the 1930s near Verona by architects Angelo Invernizzi and Ettore Fagiuli.
“They were really pushing for a traditional farmhouse,” explains architect Matthew Hufft, of the Kansas City–based firm Hufft Projects. “But through the design process, they got more and more excited about modern.”
The glazed door and other openings allow guests to enjoy sunset views from bed.
The A-frame structure is elevated on pad footings.
Stargazing is easy thanks to the lack of light pollution.
JR's Hut is an off-grid glamping destination near Gundagai, NSW.
The architect chose granite for the house’s base, zinc for its roof, and Scandinavian pinewood for cladding—all materials that complement the nearby gray stone building.
Lake House

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.