118 Exterior Metal Roof Material Stucco Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

An outdoor shower on the rear gable of the house is used for rinsing off from the pool or after an outdoor excursion—or for a quick wash down for their two rescue dogs.
A sequence of steel beams and columns supporting the first-floor addition extend 1.5 meters from the home, creating an outdoor terrace beneath. Clear polycarbonate sheeting is installed between two of the beams, protecting the terrace from rain and sun.
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The dairy is juxtaposed against the “modern industrial” extension, which is clad in Cemintel Barestone panels. The original facade and windows of the dairy bring a unique character to the project.
The stucco-clad tiny home is punctuated by archways, including the arched entrance, and two courtyards—one of which peeks out from beneath the cantilevered front facade.
The pared-back approach of the remodel begins with the front entry, where horizontal bands of orange-toned cedar were replaced with a refined wood screen.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
Most of the year, the family keep the sliding glass doors—which span 16 feet from the living room to the exterior deck—of their Tampa dwelling open, giving it the aura of a Sarasota Modern home. Stunning cantilevered overhangs, in the spirit of Paul Rudolph's Umbrella House, help tame the sun.
Since Courtyard House is on a street that gets daily traffic from a nearby school, the home is protected by a concrete masonry wall that shields a courtyard, pool, and patio.
The home is a traditional, single-fronted Victorian terrace. The architects reinstated many of the original features that were missing from the front of the home before the renovation.
Seen today, it’s hard to imagine that Jessy Moss and Steve Jocz’s glistening white home in Indian Wells, California, was marketed as a teardown only two years ago. Sparing it the wrecking ball, Jessy, an interior designer who used to be a singer/songwriter, and Steve, a realtor who was once a member of the band Sum 41, embarked on a restoration. During the project, they uncovered evidence that the home might be an unrecognized work by iconic architect William F. Cody. The circular pavers in the driveway, replicas of originals, are strikingly similar to those Cody used for another midcentury motor court.
With both an aging relative and a wheelchair user in mind, architect Neal Schwartz creates a family guesthouse designed to be accessible to all. Resident Elizabeth Twaddell enjoys the weather with her daughter Uma outside the guesthouse Schwartz designed for her mother-in-law, Surendra, who frequently visits for extended stays. A concrete driveway forks off from the main house to lead to a covered breezeway, sited between the new 775-square-foot structure and a two-car garage.
Clustered around a sunny courtyard, Three Piece House’s three volumes—a main house, comprising two volumes (one for living and the other for sleeping) connected via a sun-soaked reading corridor, and a free-standing guest studio—are oriented for optimal passive solar conditions, including access to cooling ocean breezes. Recycled brick paving ties the volumes together. Located in the garden, the studio accommodates visiting friends, family, and guests.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
“Everything was in fairly bad repair,” says Jessy Moss, recalling her first impression of seeing the 1961 post-and-beam home on Zillow. But one feature that caught her eye—and hinted to her that the house might be worth a visit—was the cluster of circular pavers that enlivened the driveway. Later, after she and her husband, Steve Jocz, bought the home, they had new concrete pavers laid in a similar pattern.
The gabled entry features a patterned, wood rainscreen that evokes the forked ribs of the Saguaro cactus while the recessed entry is akin to a Saguaro boot, the holes in the giant cacti that many desert animals use as their homes.
The recessed entry features a disguised door for guests
A disguised door for guests
The house draws its name, “Pleats,” from the corrugated metal that wraps the gabled volume, reminiscent of the pleated exterior of the Saguaro cactus.
Law Estates Wines spans 55 acres with full panoramic views of the Paso Robles countryside. The building reflects that of their varietals—showcasing natural characteristics in minimalist style. The design is a direct response to the natural materials of the site, its hillside topography, and climatic influences of the sun and wind.
The guesthouse, located uphill from the main residence, consists of a bedroom, bathroom, and sitting room.
The gated home is a quiet and private sanctuary, yet it's only a 15-minute drive from downtown Santa Barbara.
Set into the Santa Barbara foothills, the house offers uninterrupted views in all directions.
Mesa Contemporary is highlighted by several interesting details, including large second-story cantilevers, exterior elevations built entirely of glass, and a view of Santa Barbara from every room. A clearstory window system gives the appearance of a roof that floats on top of the elegant structure below.
The couple stripped the original home's rusty red cladding and replaced it with cement board with a painted stucco finish. All doors were custom made by Mike and Lauren out of laurel, an affordable and beautiful tropical wood native to the mountains of Costa Rica.
After: The couple renovated Casa Terrosa for just $46,280, including labor, in a span of seven months.
Once an abandoned 1957 cabin, the Harvest Moon Hideaway has been thoughtfully converted into a striking two-bedroom abode, now well equipped to fit the needs of modern-day living.
A larger Lindsey Adelman chandelier hangs in the foyer, located off the double-height entryway.
The homeowner of Via Media Residence needed a workspace that would stand separate from domestic life. Matt Fajkus Architecture added a freestanding structure that acts as both a studio and a pool house—and is strategically positioned to frame views of the pool, the hills, and the cactus-filled slope in the back.
A lap pool and gym were installed so that the original owner could have a place to exercise—and entertain.
Wild Lilac is set on the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains, far removed from the glitz of Los Angeles. LaHabra Santa Barbara Mission Finish stucco was used for the exterior to protect the home from strong sun.
Northeast FaçadeIn a naturally fragmented and disconnected context, the Gafarim House offers monolithic, opaque volumes to the street, citing the compact, parallelepipedic masses of northern Portuguese popular architecture and adjusting its scale to the surroundings.
Via Media Residence by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Leonid Furmansky
"When we started out, Casey wasn’t married and wasn’t dating anyone," says architect Arthur Furman. "So the original project brief was less about bedrooms and bathrooms, and more about the character of the home. Specifically, the shape. Casey had an image in his mind of a house he had photographed early in his career in a wooded area of Maine. The house was a basic shape—as one would draw as a child—just a box with a gabled roof." The home's simple gabled shape is emphasized by the use of burnished stucco on all sides.
The contemporary home is a beautiful take on desert modernism.
The 1000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The façade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” said Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
The 1,000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The facade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” says Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it, and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
The project's prime, corner lot real estate dictated the organization of the separate living quarters. The main house's driveway and entryway, for example, are located on Maude Street, giving permanent residents a sense of privacy.
Spacious windows and a slotted facade provide curbside appeal at every angle.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
Set back from the street, the International-style home features deep, overhanging eaves and a band of clerestory windows that wraps around the entire home.
A peek of the Axiom Desert House from the exterior, with the beautiful San Jacinto mountain range in the distance.
Sustainably sourced, radially sawn silvertop ash clads the exterior and will develop a gray patina over time. The architects wanted to celebrate the timber’s rough grain.
Architect Neal Schwartz was tasked with designing a family guesthouse with both an aging relative and a wheelchair user in mind; at a maximum size of 775 square feet per the local zoning regulations, the home would need to be a single-level structure but also deal with the connection between the main house and the guest house. The solution was a new garage with a breezeway that connected to the guest house, all at the same level, and with a sculptural opening in the roof of the breezeway for light and air.
Overall, the design strove to preserve some of the character of the original front facade while allowing a contemporary structure to unfold.
The design of the remodel negotiates a 12-foot drop from the front of the lot to the back with a modified roof form that allows for three stories.
TThe first modern construction in historic Hyde Park, the forward-thinking residence unabashedly volunteers a fresh point of view in the architectural dialogue of the neighborhood.
The home's dramatic eastern elevation asserts a more commanding presence with expansive glazing on both levels, boldly "opening up" to visitors and passersby.
Situated on a corner lot with two "front yards," the home is uniquely positioned to make distinctive statements from each street-facing vantage point. The home's southern entry features modest glazing and warm, cedar accents.
The home's horizontal massing, tastefully in rhythm with the neighborhood, complements the scale of existing homes in the historic enclave.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.