67 Exterior Metal Roof Material Brick Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The entrance door is made of mirror-like glass to enhance privacy.
The gaps in the brickwork naturally brighten the interiors.
The gaps between the courses also allow the brick wall to double as a window, framing views and drawing in more light and air.
The traditional bricklaying technique enabled the second-level interior space to become larger.
The home is thought to be one of the first brick structures in the area.
Respecting the site’s heritage, the architects retain the house’s terrace façade.
A new anthracite zinc roof sits within the walls, and protrudes upward to create extra interior height.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
As its name suggests, the house rests upon wooden stilts, which passively cools the interiors.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
Massive wooden fence, which is a stripe, is on the background of a brick house, which is a square.
The neighboring garden cottage originally was Randolph’s law office. This space shares a garden with the old carriage house.
Tall, slender teak trunks are secured to the ground with the weight of adobe bricks—a material that’s commonly used in the area—to support the walls and roof.
The communal area is fitted with wooden sliding doors, which open to connect the space seamlessly with the surrounding garden.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.
Design provides a delicate layer of privacy, capturing the coastal breezes from all rooms and successfully bringing the outside in.
The home presents a narrow facade to the street.
From the street, a discrete metallic wall features two green steel doors on either side.
Given the simplicity of the house’s brick façade—a seven-foot brick base with a massive gabled roof on top—the complex spatial geometry of the interiors comes as a surprise to visitors.
The owner—a ceramics artist—wanted to make the best of the topography of the lot, and also requested views of the site's nearby horse arena.
The house is composed of two volumes.
To enable the two families to live independently, and interdependently, Estudio A0 co-founder Ana María Durán Calisto came up with a 5,457-square-foot home that consists of two volumes, set in a Z formation.
A wooden screen provides privacy, and offers protection from the strong midday sun.
Another view of the studio.
“The project reverses the traditional suburban pattern of a house centered on its site and surrounded by empty space,” says Beer. Instead of a lawn, it has three courtyards behind a brick wall.
The contrast between the old, dilapedated brick structure and the new, smooth Corten steel create a balance between the old and new.
Margarita McGrath and Scott Oliver of Noroof Architects termed the 1,650-square-foot house in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, “Pushmi-Pullyu,” in reference to the interior-exterior flow they created. Resident Jill Magid, pictured on her front steps with son Linus, is a conceptual artist; she fabricated the neon house numbers.
Brammy and Kyprianou hardly touched the front of their house, an 1880 sandstone and brick Victorian with galvanized iron ornamentation.
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.