210 Exterior Metal Roof Material Shed Roofline Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The 304-square-foot house in Queensland, Australia, is clad with steel and cedar—materials that help the home meld with the wooded landscape.
When a family in Queensland, Australia, suffered the loss of a loved one, a tiny home became their ticket to financial freedom.
The home sits over a single level on the site and has a long, linear form that extends landscape views to the horizon. It is aligned to frame both the sunrise and the sunset.
The design concept is based around an interior space protected by an outer wrapper. The facade is a cement stucco, and the exterior roof structure is supported by durable cedar timbers with a basic Galvalume metal roof over a TPO flat roof. “We tried to use standard materials and finishes to minimize costs,” reveals architect Ryan Bollom.
While the home is located in a ranch-style neighborhood surrounded by other houses, the plots are large enough to make it feel like a remote area. “Before we started designing, we brought tents and camped on-site,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “You can watch the sun rise over the east hills, set over the west hills, and enjoy the stars at night. The place just brings a sense of calm and relaxation.”
Over the coming decades, the owners plan to rejuvenate the surrounding land, which features beautiful blue gum trees and scented gum trees, but is badly affected by invasive species. “The bush has been let go and is infested with weeds,” says the client Roger Nelson. “We need to reduce the fuel load and allow the wildflowers and native grasses to come through.”
The glazed entry is on the southern side of the building, and it’s accessed via a loose court. From this position, you can see the distinction between the two sheds. The home is accessed via a small timber walkway that leads to a brass door.
The verandas provide a threshold between the internal and external spaces. “They soften the abrupt change and mediate the relationship between inside and out,” says architect Ben Shields.
“We wanted to make a feature of the large gable roofs,” says architect Ben Shields. “A family home in Nagasaki by Matsuyama Architect and Associates was inspirational in that regard—it has a completely featureless gable roof that is the key design feature externally.”
The home was designed as a retreat for architect Roger Nelson and his wife Jane, a teacher of yoga. “We were very involved in the process, as once the ‘building documentation’ was complete we administered the project,” says Roger. “It’s a space for us to unwind and relax alone or with family and friends.” Ironbark timber was selected for the exterior cladding due to its high BAL (Bushfire Attack Level) rating.
With his mother moving from Massachusetts to California to be closer to family, architect Peter Liang created a 265-square-foot tiny home, dubbed the Kleines Haus, behind his sister’s residence in Oakland for the matriarch to land in. “Since we are a mixed family, it’s key that my kids are close to their grandparents,” says homeowner Stefanie Liang Chung. “Now their German grandmother is teaching them, and I’m grateful that I have an Asian partner who knows that you take in your in-laws.”
The cedar cladding was inspired by the towering mature oaks on the property.
The 400-square-foot work studio that architect Bulent Baydar, of Harrison Design, designed for Virginia-based screenwriter Matthew Michael Carnahan features NanaWall doors that fold open and connect the interior to the natural surroundings.
The studio is clad with cedar, glass, and a sloping, standing-seam metal roof.
The firm streamlined the window plan for the apartment above the garage.
Living in a remote cabin poses challenges in the cold winter months. “The latest challenge is keeping the two 1000-liter backup rainwater tanks in the shed at the back of the house from freezing,” says the owner. “I experimented this winter with installing a doc-fan ventilation system in the connecting wall that pushes heat from inside the house to the shed to keep it hovering just above freezing point.”
Locally milled cypress siding, a naturally rot-resistant wood, will darken over time.
Solar panels populate the upper roof, and a double-height atrium in the middle helps to break up the home's massing.
A covered front porch spills out to the yard and anchors the house to the site.
The owner is a freelance documentary filmmaker who found that city living was stifling his creativity. “I have always been more creative in a vast space,” he says. “So, being surrounded by wilderness really attracted me.” It was important that the surrounding forest not be dramatically impacted by the build, and only five trees were removed during the construction.
The owner was motivated to build his own home to avoid a mortgage and to gain the know-how to undertake his own maintenance and repairs. “I was craving the personal challenge to cultivate a home for myself,” he says. “As it was the beginning of a new adventure, I wanted it to be personal. Also, practically speaking, if I built each piece of the home by hand, I would have a good sense of how to solve problems or improve it, without having to ask anyone else to journey through the forest, down the trail, and up the cliff to make an adjustment.”
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
The house is quite large, and one of McCabe’s challenges involved “figuring out how to get this much house on the site without it feeling overwhelming, and still having it live small for the family day-to-day,” he says.
“The site had been a small farm with a modest house on it, among a glorious grove of old towering oaks in gray and green. The wild grasses and flowers were taking over,” David Oldroyd says.
The design team made extensive use of Australian hardwood—both internally and externally— to reference the rural setting.
The home is called The Barn, as it was inspired by the American barns that the couple admired on travels throughout the United States.
The warm amber color of the cedar makes the shed glow at night.
The home’s charred-cedar rain screen facade blends in with the forested 15-acre site.
Before renovations, the farm had been abandoned for some 17 years.
Surrounded by native grasses, the outdoor entertaining area is lowered to give spatial difference.
Reclaimed cedar from the original chicken coop was used for siding.
At Under, a Snøhetta-designed restaurant balanced on the Norwegian coast, guests dine 16 feet below the ocean’s surface. The tilted concrete tube gives the impression that it’s sliding into the sea. “The idea was to make a tube that would bring people from above sea level down under the sea,” lead architect Rune Grasdal told Dezeen. “That transition is easy to understand, but it’s also the most effective way to do it. It also feels secure, but you don’t feel trapped.” The angle was also designed with the building’s aquatic neighbors in mind. Over time the structure will become part of its environment, acting as an artificial reef. Marine research tools like cameras have been installed outside the restaurant to help scientists learn about the population, behavior, and diversity of the species living in this part of the North Atlantic.
Heritage hemlock, purchased from Old Order Mennonites, clads one of the facades. "The whole [aging] process takes about three years to get the boards into the position where they have turned gray enough," says Bocken.
The property was a serendipitous find by architect Nicholas Ancerl and a development partner, who were driving through the quaint streets of Parkland. The new facade features black house numbers from Gingers, loft-style windows from Kingshore Windows & Doors, and antique brick from King Masonry.
In Toronto’s West End lies Sorauren 116, one half of a dual residential development that was completed over an arduous, three-year period by architects from Ancerl Studio.
If you’d like to make room for visiting friends and family without moving to a larger home, take notes from these accessory dwelling units (ADUs), lower-level guest spaces, and other inventive in-law units that treat Grandma right.
The top priorities for Chalet M—a small, plywood cabin in the suburban area of São Lourenço da Serra in São Paulo, Brazil—were to ensure the lightest possible footprint on its forest site, and to maximize the experience of being one with nature for its owners.
In Finland, two students with little experience but a lot of gumption design a minimalist home in the woods and build most of it—from the roofing to the stovepipes—on their own.
When Austin-based firm Matt Fajkus Architecture was tasked with renovating this classic midcentury home, they sought to open up the interior—not only by unifying the common areas into an open-plan layout, but also by literally raising the home's roof. This strategy increased the ceiling height on three sides of the home, allowing for the insertion of clerestory windows to create a bright and airy open living space. "The raised ceiling maintains the original pitched roof geometry to stay harmonious with the existing gabled roof in the private zone," explain the architects in a statement.
These design-forward home builders on the West Coast are crafting tiny dwellings that are big on style and sustainability.
Clustered around a sunny courtyard, Three Piece House’s three volumes—a main house, comprising two volumes (one for living and the other for sleeping) connected via a sun-soaked reading corridor, and a free-standing guest studio—are oriented for optimal passive solar conditions, including access to cooling ocean breezes. Recycled brick paving ties the volumes together. Located in the garden, the studio accommodates visiting friends, family, and guests.
The cabin’s concept was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-square-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
On the southwest side of the island are the studio and the wood-fired sauna. Both buildings face uninterrupted views of the sea.
Off to the side of the main house is a compact beach house with two bunk rooms and a wooden deck.
The 323-square-foot guest house is located behind the main house and contains two bedrooms, a fully tiled bathroom with ceramic tile floors, subfloor heating, laundry facilities, and a Cinderella incineration toilet.
Indoor/outdoor living is emphasized with wraparound decks, covered patios, and large windows throughout the property.
The cabins are set on rocky formations and oriented for optimal panoramic views and guest privacy. Depending on the time of year, guests can enjoy views of the Northern Lights, the midnight sun, and the continent's largest colony of sea eagles.
Entered from the south-facing rear, each cabin was designed to be as compact as possible with a footprint of roughly 320 square feet.
Bergmann and Becker traveled from Germany, where they were studying, to the remote lakeside site in Finland to complete the project over three summers. They prefabricated the modular frames in Bergmann’s grandparents’ barn (which had electricity) to avoid weather disruptions.
Built with trees felled on-site, a 650-foot-long elevated pathway connects the cabin to the nearest road.
Dubbed Small but Fine, the 280-square-foot cabin connects with the outdoors and features a minimal footprint. Not pictured is a detached outhouse with a composting toilet.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.