42 Exterior Metal Roof Material Shed Roofline Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The home sits over a single level on the site and has a long, linear form that extends landscape views to the horizon. It is aligned to frame both the sunrise and the sunset.
The design concept is based around an interior space protected by an outer wrapper. The facade is a cement stucco, and the exterior roof structure is supported by durable cedar timbers with a basic Galvalume metal roof over a TPO flat roof. “We tried to use standard materials and finishes to minimize costs,” reveals architect Ryan Bollom.
While the home is located in a ranch-style neighborhood surrounded by other houses, the plots are large enough to make it feel like a remote area. “Before we started designing, we brought tents and camped on-site,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “You can watch the sun rise over the east hills, set over the west hills, and enjoy the stars at night. The place just brings a sense of calm and relaxation.”
On the first story, the walls facing the carport are entirely opaque for total privacy.
The home’s board-formed concrete exterior walls exude a rustic, imperfect quality.
Tall trees and an extended roof canopy provide the house with plenty of privacy.
From the street, the house is shielded from inquisitive eyes.
A tall tree grows through a large aperture in the mono-pitched roof, bringing an outdoor feel to the inside of the house.
The home’s simple, abstract shape contrasts with neighboring homes, which are mainly clad in terra-cotta roof tiles.
The mono-pitched roof is made from timber battens and Lysaght Kip-lock steel roofing.
A sequence of steel beams and columns supporting the first-floor addition extend 1.5 meters from the home, creating an outdoor terrace beneath. Clear polycarbonate sheeting is installed between two of the beams, protecting the terrace from rain and sun.
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The dairy is juxtaposed against the “modern industrial” extension, which is clad in Cemintel Barestone panels. The original facade and windows of the dairy bring a unique character to the project.
Cedar, glass, and concrete combine in this minimalist pool house that draws inspiration from Mies van der Rohe’s 1929 Barcelona Pavilion. The pool house, built into a mountainside west of Montreal and designed by Halifax–based MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects, employs board-formed concrete for the home's expressive exterior.
Heritage hemlock, purchased from Old Order Mennonites, clads one of the facades. "The whole [aging] process takes about three years to get the boards into the position where they have turned gray enough," says Bocken.
The property was a serendipitous find by architect Nicholas Ancerl and a development partner, who were driving through the quaint streets of Parkland. The new facade features black house numbers from Gingers, loft-style windows from Kingshore Windows & Doors, and antique brick from King Masonry.
In Toronto’s West End lies Sorauren 116, one half of a dual residential development that was completed over an arduous, three-year period by architects from Ancerl Studio.
After narrowly escaping demolition in the 1990s, Frank Lloyd Wright's Thaxton House has been respectfully restored and updated—and it just returned to the market for $2,850,000. The house is one of only three Wright-designed homes in Texas, and it's the sole Wright residence in Houston.
Completed in 10 months on a flat meadow atop a wooded bluff near the Cousins River estuary, the energy-efficient residence emphasizes indoor/outdoor living for a pair of nature lovers.
The interior, including the master suite, is sided with locally sourced hoop pine plywood panels that contrast with polished concrete floors.
Located in Bunker Hill, the Thaxton House features all the hallmarks of Usonian design. It's defined by a simple, natural material palette and offers ample opportunities for indoor/outdoor living.
"The seamless connection from the interior fitness area to the exterior pool and spa aligns perfectly with the client’s wellness agenda," MacKay-Lyons says. "Additionally, the mechanical plant is hidden from view below ground, behind the house."
The spa building behind the pool is topped by a green roof.
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
Composed of four volumes and two bedrooms, the Jackson Family Retreat is located at the base of a canyon in the Big Sur area of Northern California and feaures 2,500 square feet of living space.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
The deck projects out toward the beach.
Simple, Angular Massing
The roofs are made of corrugated aluminum, and the timber sidings used at the entrance are repeated on key ceiling planes.
At the back of the property is a deliberately understated entrance, and a simple canopy that shelters the front door. This door opens onto a landing, from which a broad corridor follows the natural gradient alongside a generous garden courtyard.
"This distinctive sheltering shape is again expressed in the wrapped floor-wall-roof profile of the three wings, which—assembled together, one above the other—track the site as it slopes toward the water," says Philip Olmesdahl.
The owner wanted a cozy family escape with plenty of outdoor entertaining areas.
exterior from base of hill
Exterior Rear View
Exterior Front View

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.