38 Exterior Metal Roof Material Shed Roofline Tiny Home Design Photos And Ideas

The 304-square-foot house in Queensland, Australia, is clad with steel and cedar—materials that help the home meld with the wooded landscape.
When a family in Queensland, Australia, suffered the loss of a loved one, a tiny home became their ticket to financial freedom.
"The shipping container was placed on a cinder-block crawl space, which contains the furnace, the plumbing, and a tankless hot-water heater," Dianna says.
The Lily Pad is a 280-square-foot shipping container home located near Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio.
With his mother moving from Massachusetts to California to be closer to family, architect Peter Liang created a 265-square-foot tiny home, dubbed the Kleines Haus, behind his sister’s residence in Oakland for the matriarch to land in. “Since we are a mixed family, it’s key that my kids are close to their grandparents,” says homeowner Stefanie Liang Chung. “Now their German grandmother is teaching them, and I’m grateful that I have an Asian partner who knows that you take in your in-laws.”
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
The triangular structural support system continues on the exterior.
A pergola made of opaque, corrugated polycarbonate extends from the front facade and guards against bright sunlight, wind, and rain.
The backyard studio that architect Gerald Parsonson designed to expand a young family’s living space features a wraparound deck that connects the hideaway to the garden.
If you’d like to make room for visiting friends and family without moving to a larger home, take notes from these accessory dwelling units (ADUs), lower-level guest spaces, and other inventive in-law units that treat Grandma right.
These design-forward home builders on the West Coast are crafting tiny dwellings that are big on style and sustainability.
Burnt cedar, Japanese cypress plywood, and mortar create a trio of contrasting yet simple surface textures that breathe a relaxed vibe into the Muji Hut.
Twelve-year-old Hannah Cutler worked mightily to design and build a tiny cabin on an island in Puget Sound with her father, architect Jim Cutler. Along the way, she learned a valuable life lesson: If you can see it in your mind, you can make it.
FLEXSE measures in at 328 square feet, with an oval footprint that maximizes floorspace, according to the designers.
To optimize versatility, “the structure can be positioned on different foundations—concrete slab, metal piers, etc., which allows for placing it in the most remote areas, even on water,” says the firm.
The exterior shape, which echoes that of a covered wagon, is a riff on a whimsical design that the Parhams have previously created for clients. It also employs some tricks that maximize the home's tiny footprint.
Tongue-and-groove cedar siding clads the exterior. The windows are by Alpine.
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
With more than 50 years of experience in residential construction (not to mention their first tiny home design in 1978), Tru Form Tiny Homes features floor plans that include convertible sofa beds and lofted bed options. The Verve line, available in a variety of lengths, consistently comes in at under 1000 square feet.
This house has an exterior of black panels and clear-grain cedar tongue-and-groove siding, and a rooftop deck that lets its owners enjoy the outdoors.
With a stark and restrained design, the sense of presence and solitude are carefully elevated.
The Millennial Tiny House was designed by Build Tiny, who have built more than 12 tiny homes in 2018.
 The exterior walls and roof are made of Corrugated Colour Steel in contrasting lancewood grey and pacific cloud white, complemented by silver pearl window joinery.
The biggest challenge for Build Tiny was keeping the house under the 3,500 kilogram weight limit for New Zealand tiny homes.
Alex devised a system that takes advantage of ocean views while protecting the cottage from that same northeasterly orientation. The large windows and doors can be shuttered with corrugated aluminum panels.
Buyers should cast as wide a net as possible in terms of location and amenities.
Project Name: Basic Pod

Website: http://www.pod-idladla.com/
Western red cedar has been used for all the siding; several of the sections have been painted with Finnish linseed white paint. The single slope roof is made out of blue metal sheets. It has been fitted with roof ladders supported by five brackets on each gable.
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
"Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day," explain the architects. "They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass."
They have lived in their tiny house for more than a year now, and Robert says that the most challenging, but also the most educational and character-enriching aspect of the project was realizing that mistakes made during construction (like an imperfect mitered corner) will be forever remembered, and experienced first hand in the years to come.
Corrugated metal siding on the front of the house.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.