345 Exterior Metal Roof Material Shed Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

With his mother moving from Massachusetts to California to be closer to family, architect Peter Liang created a 265-square-foot tiny home, dubbed the Kleines Haus, behind his sister’s residence in Oakland for the matriarch to land in. “Since we are a mixed family, it’s key that my kids are close to their grandparents,” says homeowner Stefanie Liang Chung. “Now their German grandmother is teaching them, and I’m grateful that I have an Asian partner who knows that you take in your in-laws.”
The cedar cladding was inspired by the towering mature oaks on the property.
The 400-square-foot work studio that architect Bulent Baydar, of Harrison Design, designed for Virginia-based screenwriter Matthew Michael Carnahan features NanaWall doors that fold open and connect the interior to the natural surroundings.
The studio is clad with cedar, glass, and a sloping, standing-seam metal roof.
The firm streamlined the window plan for the apartment above the garage.
Living in a remote cabin poses challenges in the cold winter months. “The latest challenge is keeping the two 1000-liter backup rainwater tanks in the shed at the back of the house from freezing,” says the owner. “I experimented this winter with installing a doc-fan ventilation system in the connecting wall that pushes heat from inside the house to the shed to keep it hovering just above freezing point.”
Locally milled cypress siding, a naturally rot-resistant wood, will darken over time.
Solar panels populate the upper roof, and a double-height atrium in the middle helps to break up the home's massing.
A covered front porch spills out to the yard and anchors the house to the site.
The owner is a freelance documentary filmmaker who found that city living was stifling his creativity. “I have always been more creative in a vast space,” he says. “So, being surrounded by wilderness really attracted me.” It was important that the surrounding forest not be dramatically impacted by the build, and only five trees were removed during the construction.
The owner was motivated to build his own home to avoid a mortgage and to gain the know-how to undertake his own maintenance and repairs. “I was craving the personal challenge to cultivate a home for myself,” he says. “As it was the beginning of a new adventure, I wanted it to be personal. Also, practically speaking, if I built each piece of the home by hand, I would have a good sense of how to solve problems or improve it, without having to ask anyone else to journey through the forest, down the trail, and up the cliff to make an adjustment.”
A timber palette emphasizes indoor/outdoor living. The outdoor cedar deck visually extends the interior white oak floors. The ceilings and soffits are made of hemlock.
Designed for energy efficiency, the home features insulation above code and hydronic radiant heating. Note the Morso 6148 wood-burning stove in the entry hall that’s fueled by locally felled lumber.
Completed in 2018 on a 2.6-acre site in the San Juan Islands, the two-bedroom modular home was installed in a day.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
On the first story, the walls facing the carport are entirely opaque for total privacy.
The home’s board-formed concrete exterior walls exude a rustic, imperfect quality.
Tall trees and an extended roof canopy provide the house with plenty of privacy.
From the street, the house is shielded from inquisitive eyes.
A tall tree grows through a large aperture in the mono-pitched roof, bringing an outdoor feel to the inside of the house.
The home’s simple, abstract shape contrasts with neighboring homes, which are mainly clad in terra-cotta roof tiles.
The mono-pitched roof is made from timber battens and Lysaght Kip-lock steel roofing.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
The triangular structural support system continues on the exterior.
A pergola made of opaque, corrugated polycarbonate extends from the front facade and guards against bright sunlight, wind, and rain.
The backyard studio that architect Gerald Parsonson designed to expand a young family’s living space features a wraparound deck that connects the hideaway to the garden.
BVDS Architecture didn’t do any work to the exterior, apart from the box dormer which is clad in tiles to meet permitted development requirements. "From the outside, I think some people would regard the extension as a mistake, as it defies logic to build something that is only half a floor high," says architect George Bradley.
A sequence of steel beams and columns supporting the first-floor addition extend 1.5 meters from the home, creating an outdoor terrace beneath. Clear polycarbonate sheeting is installed between two of the beams, protecting the terrace from rain and sun.
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The dairy is juxtaposed against the “modern industrial” extension, which is clad in Cemintel Barestone panels. The original facade and windows of the dairy bring a unique character to the project.
The house is quite large, and one of McCabe’s challenges involved “figuring out how to get this much house on the site without it feeling overwhelming, and still having it live small for the family day-to-day,” he says.
“The site had been a small farm with a modest house on it, among a glorious grove of old towering oaks in gray and green. The wild grasses and flowers were taking over,” David Oldroyd says.
The design team made extensive use of Australian hardwood—both internally and externally— to reference the rural setting.
The home is called The Barn, as it was inspired by the American barns that the couple admired on travels throughout the United States.
Sculptural olive trees frame the house, which is woven with its natural setting.
An outdoor shower on the northern elevation lets the residents spend practical time in the landscape.
A colored ventilation system on the upper portion of the eastern elevation expels warm air and helps to cool the home's interior. The metal siding below the vents folds open and facilitates outdoor connection and more air circulation.
The home's simple silhouette and sloped metal roof references historical agrarian-style architecture that dots rural landscapes throughout the globe.
"The porch was designed to use most of the concrete slab surface," Sopeoglou says. "The metal panels fold out from the kitchen and allow for maximum openness. I removed the structural column from the corner so the space is free from obstruction, and the clients can enjoy the views when they gather during lunchtime."
"The architectural reference for using metal sheets is the existing sheepfolds and sheds which were scattered around these hills before any of the summer vacationers settled here," Sopeoglou says. "One can still hear during the day distant sounds of bells from the herds feeding on the land."
The 484-square-foot home is enveloped by a natural landscape of woods, mountains, and a lake.
The house’s cube-like form and its block siding create a strong geometric statement.
A yellow-painted sloping roof supports solar panels and helps to drain rainwater.
The home’s exterior is composed of stacked blocks made from mining waste and concrete. A glass wall on the rear facade contrasts with the blocks and facilitates an indoor/outdoor connection.
The warm amber color of the cedar makes the shed glow at night.
The home’s charred-cedar rain screen facade blends in with the forested 15-acre site.
Before renovations, the farm had been abandoned for some 17 years.
Surrounded by native grasses, the outdoor entertaining area is lowered to give spatial difference.
Reclaimed cedar from the original chicken coop was used for siding.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.