295 Exterior Metal Roof Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Ryan McLaughlin watches the sunset from the deck of the 160-square-foot tiny home he built, with no prior experience, at his parents’ horse ranch in Georgetown, Texas. Soon, the trailer-mounted cabin will be moved to a vineyard, where it will operate grid-free and be available to rent for short stays.
A fiberglass door covers a void in the wall that holds a solar-powered water heater, a propane tank, and wood for a fire bowl.
The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo.
The Roost26 tiny house features a lightweight, black AG metal roof and facade with a “detachable garden” on one side and bike racks on the other.
Peering into the breezeway.
The back of the home and gable ends are covered in blackened cedar.
Glass doors and a patio with steps leading down to the pond create a seamless, indoor/outdoor living experience.
"The house is totally introverted [and] mysterious towards the street and extroverted towards the interior," says Morini.
Extensive glazing and skylights fill the home's interior with natural light.
The house sits within a field of trees.
The house is composed of three separate modules.
Located in the countryside just outside Córdoba, Argentina, La Negrita is respectful of its woodland environment.
One of the modules is a garage.
Inspired by the Scandinavian barn vernacular, this Upcountry Maui cottage provides a peaceful retreat for family gatherings.
Four bedrooms and four bathrooms span two structures, with a guest wing and main residence. The Aspen, Colorado, home is 4,300 square feet.
Designed by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter for a family of four, the Split View Mountain Lodge is a holiday home near the village of Geilo, Norway. The main volume splits out to form additional annexes that frame individual views of the surrounding mountains.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
A shot of the two houses from across the pond. “It's campfires by the pond, dinner cooked in the wood fire oven…we are living the dream,” say the brothers.
A view from the outdoor deck with Jon's house on the right and Nik's home to the left.
At 2,120 square feet, Jon's home (on the left) is slightly smaller than his brother's 2,540-square-foot house (on the right). Though the homes feature different floor plans, each has five bedrooms and three bathrooms.
The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
The entry is hidden and only discoverable through a pathway that leads to a red sculpture. It's the only part of the palette that breaks the rules of the monochromatic cloaked facade.
The program is pushed to the property edges to screen adjacent neighbors and directs framed views to a large central courtyard.
Enough House by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects resides on Brian MacKay Lyons' Shobac farm in Nova Scotia, a campus that allows the firm to experiment with form, materiality, and building. The Cor-Ten steel cabin, which features exposed Douglas fir plywood sheathing and stained pine flooring inside, houses an intern architect.
The base of this cabin is constructed out of cast-in-place concrete with formwork using the same wood as the floor cladding above.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
Stairway to Heaven is located on the clients' parents' land, just steps away from the homeowner's childhood home. Two siblings were also building homes on the property, making it a true family compound. The architects were mindful to create a home that utilized the views, but also allowed for privacy between residents.
White concrete panel cladding and corrugated steel roof panels give this cabin a crisp, geometric form that almost melts into the landscape on bleary, snowy days.
Architects Stéphane Rasselet and David Dworkind delivered with a strikingly simple concept, anchoring two stacked, rectangular volumes into a steep mountainside surrounded by awe-inspiring vistas.
Oozing with charm, comfort, and modern amenities, these 10 micro homes are eagerly awaiting to help you experience the tiny house lifestyle. But brace yourself—you might become an aspiring tiny-house dweller after just one stay.
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
Surrounded by boulders and twisted yuccas, these two cabins in the Mojave Desert stand like Monopoly houses, with their steel siding weathered to a tawny finish. But behind the simple gabled forms lies a complex network that enables them to operate wholly off the grid.
Available for as low as $55,000, the Artist Bothy is a multipurpose, prefab hut designed to promote a creative spark in residents.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
A view of the back side of the two-story home reveals its dramatic glazing, which provides both levels with far-flung views into the site.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
australian victorian renovation, exterior
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
The trailer is set on wheels, so the home is easily relocatable, and can be registered as a caravan.  A power drill winds the slide-out inward and outward.
The Sojourner tiny house was built atop a high-quality, galvanized trailer chassis.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
A strip of clerestory windows brings in lots of natural light to the living room, while their high sills encourage privacy from the lane.
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
Main House
Guest House
In the Dolomite mountains, an angular copper-clad apartment building echoes the topography of its site. Photos by Hertha Hurnaus
A shark-skinning shack.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
Anka Lamprecht and Lukas Wezel shared their rustic domicile in a valley in Grotli, Norway. Boasting an enviable view, it’s the first cabin archived in the book’s “Backcountry” category that features homesteads in the wilderness.
Exposed steel, concrete soffits, and cement-washed bricks were been chosen as key components of the home due to the materials having low-maintenance, yet being extremely durable.
"The large, overhanging patio and timber shutters assist in eliminating unwanted afternoon sun. The remainder of spaces remain oriented north, with optimal overhangs to ensure climate comfort throughout seasons," explains Engelbrecht.
Warm tones of timber combined with polished concrete floors and industrial-style cabinetry give the interiors a modern, paired-back look.
There are two nearby dams on the farmland that provide drinking water for the off-grid home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.