624 Exterior Metal Roof Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The roof has no gutters, and there's an 18-inch perimeter of gravel and a subsurface drain to manage rainfall.
"It doesn't feel like it's propped in the air," says Appel.
In order for the home to have a basement, it's raised 18 inches off the ground, but Appel's "design trick" of gently grading the land so water runs away from the home makes it feel connected to the ground.
The exterior features Western red cedar siding and a standing-seam metal roof. The home is engineered to meet Passive House standards, with Makrowin Passive House Certified
windows and blown mineral wool and cellulose insulation.
Designed by Vincent Appel, principal of Of Possible Architectures, and built by Kent Hicks Construction, this single-story residence in the Berkshires of Massachusetts frames the surrounding landscape.
Surrounded by an apple orchard, an evergreen grove, and gardens originally tended by the owners’ parents, Sheffield Residence keeps family memories alive.
The Outdoor Room frames west-facing views of the Kaimai Range. “With timber-battened clear roofing above, it perfectly frames the forest views beyond, creating moments of uninterrupted connection and stillness with nature,” note the architects.
The all-timber build helps establish a continuous indoor/outdoor living experience. The interior cross-laminated timber flooring transitions to radiata pine at the outdoor deck.
The Outdoor Room divides the main house (on the left) from the guest suite/office (on the right).
The timber construction is a nod to Coromandel’s timber logging heritage.
The home is wrapped in eco-friendly Abodo Tundra shiplap with a sustainable Sioo:x finish that helps the wood develop a silvery patina over time.
The homeowners have joined New Zealand’s One Billion Trees program and plan to regenerate part of their land with native bush.
James, an avid mountain biker, with his young daughter. The outdoorsy family enjoys access to the many hiking and river swimming opportunities available on the property.
The north side of the home opens up to a covered wraparound deck and views of the Karangahake Gorge.
Curious cows are a frequent sight on the farm. The house is located upslope from a 1900s worker’s cottage that the couple renovated in 2017 and rent out on Airbnb.
The backyard addition peeks over the top of the home.
The firm strove to recreate the home as authentically as possible, which meant adding back the wrought-iron, decorative filigree that is so typical of Australian Victorian cottages.
The cabin decks all face either expansive views of the ocean or the magical forest of fir trees.
Saltwater Farm is situated on the shoreline of San Juan Island, which is only accessible via sea or air.
All the wood used for the front porch siding, decking, and furniture came from trees harvested from the land and milled/cured on the property.
The RAD LAB team thoughtfully placed each cabin amongst the pines to ensure quality views and a secluded experience for guests.
One of the driving principles behind the design of Saltwater Farm was to have minimal impact on the site, so the cabins sit above the uneven landscape on stilts.
Both the main house and the cabins were designed to bring the outside in, celebrating a connection with the surrounding forest. The expansive deck on the main house almost doubles the usable square footage, blurring the barrier between the interior and exterior.
The clients—Dr. Merriss Waters, a veterinarian, and Dr. Andrew Fleming, a clinical child psychologist—had a lifelong dream to live in a pristine, pastoral setting in the Pacific Northwest. “They live an active lifestyle and enjoy exploring the islands,” says architect Taylor Bode. “Their hobbies include mountain biking, trail running, farming, and cooking for friends and family.”  In addition to an event space in an existing barn and cabin rentals, Saltwater Farm is home to productive gardens and a variety of animals.
Five cabins are located in the pine forest surrounding the main house. “The design for both the main house and cabins at Saltwater Farm resulted from studying traditional Pacific Northwest cabins and refining that vernacular language with one of Scandinavian minimalism,” says designer Taylor Bode.
Saltwater Farm is located just outside the small town of Friday Harbor, which has a population of less than 2,500. “San Juan Island has a beautiful valley populated with farms, and it’s supported by a tourism- and agriculture-driven economy,” says designer Taylor Bode. “It was seen by Andrew and Merriss as the perfect place to bring their farm vision to life.”
A dry creek bed arranged beneath the glass corridor emphasizes its elevated positioning. The creek bed is composed of large native boulders and runs the length of the property.
A two-story glass corridor connects the existing home to the new bedroom wing.
The team removed the outdated exterior detailing and replaced it with vertical strips of Kebony Clear siding and a Freedom Gray copper standing seam metal roof. “Kebony offered that same sort of silvery weathering that would get us that [Cape] aesthetic, and the feel of this house being set in the landscape,” says Yoon.
Amid the current crisis, it’s natural to long for an escape—and the severe, otherworldly beauty of Joshua Tree in Southern California may have more of a pull than ever. Whether you’re looking to book a long-term stay or bookmarking places in anticipation of future travel, these Airbnbs offer up Southwestern vibes in a sprawling, desert landscape. Read on for our top picks—from the architectural wonder that is Acido Dorado to Instagram-famous digs and hidden gems.
“It was a careful process to demolish what we didn’t need, but keep everything we could of the original cottage,” Rhodes says. The builders took extra time to make sure everything was perfect, as the clients are sensitive to external elements like mold and dust. All of the paint and finishes are VOC-free.
The cedar-clad tiny house Emma McAllan-Braun and Joel Braun created with Mint Tiny Homes features a pine deck with a stock tank swimming pool.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.
The previous home on the Park Terrace site was damaged in the earthquake and subsequently demolished. Architect Phil Redmond, director of PRau, used this project to explore an archetypal industrial form which was lost as a result of the earthquakes.
“A conglomeration of boxes around a bit of a pitched roof” is how Mark describes his transformation of the 1920s Los Angeles bungalow. Inverting the traditional layout, he set the private rooms in the front and a large, open living area in the rear.
An outdoor shower on the rear gable of the house is used for rinsing off from the pool or after an outdoor excursion—or for a quick wash down for their two rescue dogs.
Beneath the sharply angled car park of the midcentury house, aqua-colored paint and exposed wood siding give a new look to the existing facade. The design team brightened the front steps with geometric tiles.
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
ÖÖD offers a range of “mirror houses”—tiny prefab cabins that are often used as guest houses, countryside getaways, and Airbnb accommodations. So far they’ve built projects in 12 different countries, including Estonia, Finland, and Norway. The ÖÖD Iceland home is a bespoke design, based on the clients’ wishes and strict local building requirements. These impacted everything from the dwelling’s structural properties and energy efficiency to the pitched roof.
“The result is an unusual, simple, and monochrome architecture exploring the purity of the square,” note the architects.
The project’s only splurge was the installation of Shalwin tilt and turn aluminum windows, which cost twice as much as standard windows.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.