734 Exterior Metal Roof Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Cover designed this 414-square-foot prefab office/guesthouse specifically for the Hollywood site.
The tiny home is clad with standing-seam metal and cedar. An outdoor kitchen area on the deck provides added living space and ties the home to the natural landscape.
Tony and Charlotte Perez designed and built their own 280-square-foot home, which features an expansive deck off of the front facade.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
Whipplewood’s North facade. “There’s always people coming out to the house to hang around and be on the water. It was a house for one person, but it had to have a lot of social space—that was the idea with the cantilever decks and all the glass,” explains architect Eric Sokol.
“A conglomeration of boxes around a bit of a pitched roof” is how Mark describes his transformation of the 1920s Los Angeles bungalow. Inverting the traditional layout, he set the private rooms in the front and a large, open living area in the rear.
"Radical sustainability
Charred Siberian timber complements the original brick home.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
“Mill-finished aluminum cladding was allowed for fast and efficient construction, and it also creates soft reflections of the garden and the ever changing color of the sky in its surface,” says the firm.
Previously, the residents needed to go down a steep staircase to reach the garden. The new extension lowers the floor level to make the landscape much more accessible.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
Metal details accent the home’s pared-down material palette.
A perforated metal screen allows the family to “see people on the street—but they can’t see the other direction into the house,” Lazor says.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
“Every single part of the Living Vehicle design and engineering is completely new for 2020,” says Matthew. “It has a 100% aluminum structure, frame, and floor—with no wood products part of the structural system. It also has outstanding insulation design, with extensive thermal testing for very hot and very cold travel.” The Living Vehicle is wrapped in anodized, marine-grade aluminum that is highly weather-, water-, and scratch-resistant.
"The home is angled to capture the winter sun and the summer shade," Ana says.
The couple, who both have engineering backgrounds, enjoyed sharing their ideas with the architects. The result is their Hill Country dream home.
BVDS Architecture didn’t do any work to the exterior, apart from the box dormer which is clad in tiles to meet permitted development requirements. "From the outside, I think some people would regard the extension as a mistake, as it defies logic to build something that is only half a floor high," says architect George Bradley.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
When envisioning the perfect home for their family, Kiley and Jim agreed that accessibility was paramount—access to the outdoors, and access for their daughters, Langley and Boelyn, who have special needs and rely on their wheelchairs to get around. After purchasing a narrow lot in Downers Grove, Illinois, the couple reached out to Chicago-based firm Kuklinski + Rappe Architects to design a residence that would serve their daughters, their son Huck, and their own various needs. Crafted to adapt to the family's lifestyle over the years, the home will provide lifelong health and happiness.
The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
The Goya House is broken down into a series of pavilions, including a separate master suite (seen at left) connected by a glass bridge.
The house's front door, tucked under one of many cantilevering portions of the roof, comes after passing through an interior courtyard. "It’s not just an axial arrival to the front door," says Wright. "You come in and shift to the right, and cross a small bridge over the entry water feature. Those little shifts [help] guide a visitor to see these different points of view."
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
All of the labor and materials to build the homes were graciously donated, meaning that the design couldn't be too extravagant and work well with the given materials. Community First! wanted each home to feel warm and welcoming, but also be relatively maintenance-free.
"The main issue with site planning is the units are relatively dense out there," Taylor says. "The building has to take advantage of sun orientation and seasonal breezes, but also have privacy. This site, in particular, was also next to a swale so there are many insects during the summer months."
Community First! has anchored itself within the community through partnerships with various businesses, other nonprofits, faith organizations, and local schools, offering its residents opportunities for success in every aspect of their lives.
These steps lead to the rooftop garden. They run alongside the master bathroom, which features a glazed corner detail inspired by Carlo Scarpa's Canova Museum.
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
The planted grass roofs are a recreation of the landscape that existed before the home was built. They are dynamic landscapes that change with the seasons.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Off-shutter concrete is created by removing the shuttering—normally wooden planks used as a temporary structure to contain setting concrete. "Casting the perfect texture of old wooden planks on the concrete, while getting all the services placed correctly inside the shuttering, was an Herculean task," says Daffonchio.
The material palette is almost exclusively "off-shutter" concrete, both inside and outside. The main metal elements are crafted from raw steel.
Monaghan Farm is a 1,300-acre eco-estate about an hour north of the center of Johannesburg. The architectural and environmental guidelines for the estate outline that only 3% of the land will ever be built on.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
The home features a flat roofline, and it’s composed of stained red cedar, concrete, and basalt—materials that weather well and blend seamlessly with the land.
The mostly blank brick-clad exterior belies the complex geometries that inform the multilevel plan inside. The windows are arranged to frame specific views—including the steeple of the nearby St. Michael’s Church—while retaining privacy from the street.
Windows wrap around the sides of the cabins to maximize views.
The timber structures are made from durable Douglas Fir posts and beams.
The sloped metal roofs were designed to capture rain, which is used in the cabins.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.