94 Exterior Metal Roof Material A Frame Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The 1.5-kilometer road leading to the cabin is well maintained, although Dignard cautions against low-suspension vehicles, and recommends good winter tires for access.
On one side of the A-frame, an empty volume tucked beneath the sloping roofline creates a sheltered porch with a hammock. Homes in Le Maelström are intended to be eco-friendly. La Cabin is off-grid and powered with solar panels.
La Cabin Ride & Sleep sits on an 11-acre parcel in Le Maelström, a vacation community in the town of Lac-Beauport, in Quebec.
"The home has a very organic design," Ana says. "It’s almost like a Frank Lloyd Wright where everything just melts into the background."
The front door is a near-perfect color match to the site’s purple mountain laurel blooms.
The property, which is a good 10-15 minutes from the center of San Marcos, "is at the end of a dead-end road and has this remote feeling. They really wanted a home that felt connected to nature and a place where they could enjoy the mountain laurels and views," Nance says.
The palette of limestone, glass, and steel creates an old-meets-new look.
While the cabin was built for year-round use, its location in the village of Petite-Rivière-Saint-François in Québec, Canada, makes for a cozy winter retreat while skiing at nearby slopes.
Seemingly carved out of the sloping roofline, the terrace is clad in contrasting birch plywood.
To the left, the home's main entrance is nestled underneath the sloping roof. Views of the river from a large terrace reference the expansive perspective from a ship's upper deck.
Cabin A by Bourgeois / Lechasseur architectes is perched on the mountainside overlooking the Saint Lawrence River in Québec, Canada. The "A" in the name references the nautical alphabet of the International Code of Signals (ICS), while the home's angular form was derived from the maritime Alfa signal flag and the shape of a ship's sail facing the wind.
Oasis Tiny House, clad in teal-painted plywood and a metal roof that's pitched in the front and curved in the rear, was designed and built by Ellie and Dan Madsen of Paradise Tiny Homes in Keaau, Hawaii.
Minim Homes are wrapped in beautiful shiplapped cypress that will gently age to gray—and they can be outfitted with 960-watt solar systems to go entirely off grid. Production of the homes is currently on hold, but interested parties can purchase plans on Minim’s website.
<span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The architect couple's h</span><span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">ouse, which sits at the edge of a meadow, marks the first time the award-winning designers have integrated ground-up architecture and interior fittings so closely.</span>
The expansive glazing allows the occupants to appreciate not just the views, but shifting light and shadow play throughout the day.
The region’s famous West Cornwall Covered Bridge is one of the many vernacular inspirations for the house’s pitched-roof form.
The triangulated architecture fits into the rugged Appalachian landscape.
The cabin has a sleek silhouette and an A-frame roof.
The cabins can be constructed with minimal impact on the surrounding land, as builders can transport materials by foot and using 4x4s.
ZeroCabins are constructed from a simple palette of wood and metal.
The cabins can be customized for different locations.
The two-story cabin runs solely off of solar power and rainwater.
Glowing like a lantern in the night, the Hara House is a welcoming space for residents and local community members.
Takayuki Shimada of Takeru Shoji Architects designed this A-frame residence in the rural village of Tsurugasone, Japan. A tent-like white steel roof tops the home, which mixes private spaces with a semipublic, open-air living and dining area.
A custom daybed that runs along one side of the A-frame living area seems tailor-made for reading. Its red color recurs often in Radic’s body of work.
The deck was built on-site from local timber and incorporates an existing tree.
Inspired by Nordic folklore and fire towers that dot the surrounding forests, PAN Treetop Cabins by architect Espen Surnevik make for a fairy-tale holiday.
Want to build your own tiny house? Now you can purchase plans for this award-winning home from Minim. Designed with the belief that "humans can and must live more sustainably, but not without style," the Minim House integrates thoughtful, green design into all of its 264 square feet.
When they needed more room for visiting children and grandkids, Karen and Rick Hawkins paid homage to a once common Midwestern sight, the corn crib, by adding to their family farm.
Lit from within, the guesthouse is a welcoming beacon in the night. “It’s nice to show that this kind of agricultural vernacular can be a contemporary thing,” says designer Jason Kentner.
“I knew that if the structure was done right, it would look like it had always been there,
Sliding doors in the slatted shell conceal the side entry.
Horizontal wood siding adds a warm note to the gray metal cladding on the exterior of the Farmhouse model.
After: The custom milled siding is Alaskan yellow cedar. "It was chosen specially because of what it will look like after it grays out," says Liang. "And that plays into the whole inspiration of Sea Ranch for the home."
An aerial shot of the property showing the house nestled in a clearing. The dense wooded surroundings inspired the couple to prioritize exterior views in the home’s design
The vertical metal panels of the exterior siding reference the tall tree trunks that surround the house.
The tiny house is perched at the edge of a large pond on the property.
Gray-painted corrugated metal exterior siding offsets white-painted galvanized standing-seam metal siding on the front and rear of the house.
The tiny house features a front porch that spans the width of the house and looks to a large pond. The pair of Adirondack chairs was a gift from the Nashes’ son, and were hand-painted by their daughter.
The metal-clad tiny house that architect Will Randolph of Archimania designed for his uncle and aunt, Jon and Niki Nash, stands in a natural clearing surrounded by pine, oak, and hickory trees in Okitebbeha County, Mississippi.
The house is clad in Siberian larch and has a standing-seam Galvalume roof. Landscape architect Karin Ursula used native plantings to help the land recover from construction. The gravel put down in lieu of new soil will gradually fill in with plants as leaves decompose and produce a layer of soil.
When Maria Ibañez de Sendadiano and Todd Rouhe decided to build a family retreat in a protected area of upstate New York, their goal was to maximize sustainability and minimize their impact on the land. The longhouse-style dwelling, erected on a raised platform between two seasonal streams, benefits from passive thermal strategies and is powered by solar energy.
Fogged glass grants residents a city view while maintaining privacy from neighboring onlookers. Constructed from four larger pieces, timber and steel structure's walls are packed with coconut fiber insulation.
The home can be placed on any flat surface where there are connections to water and sewage. Apartment building roofs are an ideal fit, but finding complexes willing to host the structures may be a challenge, along with addressing access to roofs for those dwelling above.
Tucked away in California’s Sierra National Forest, this remote and rentable vacation home has a cozy interior that embraces outdoor views.
While this may look like a typical beach house from the outside with cedar siding and a low-pitched roof, a surprise awaits on the beachfront side of the home. A garage-style glass door opens at the touch of a button to welcome the salty sea breeze and plenty of sunlight.
Built of galvanized steel, the new front door conveys safety and security. The owners had previously experienced a break-in, and they thought a more imposing entrance could serve as a deterrent. Directly behind the entry is the courtyard linking the old and new buildings.
Designed by Espen Surnevik, the PAN Treetop Cabins consist of two A-frame structures elevated into the treetops of a Norwegian forest.
Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, this A-frame cabin was saved from ruins by an ambitious couple who temporarily turned it into a home for five.
A luxurious rural retreat that doesn’t skimp on comfort, JR’s Hut is an off-grid glamping destination with spectacular views of the 7,000-acre Kimo Estate in Australia.
Energy-efficient LED lighting and a rainwater collection system round out the home's sustainable features.
Incorporating a 12-inch-thick double stud exterior wall, the contemporary farmhouse is a prime example of green construction, down to the air-to-water heat pump boiler.
Designed by Giovanni Pesamosca Architetto, this shelter in the Italian Alps fits nine beds within its triangular A-frame structure. Situated along the Ceria-Merlone trail at an altitude of 8,303 meters, the shelter is a memorial to Luca Vuerich, a well-known mountain guide who was killed by an avalanche while climbing an iced waterfall in the mountains near Tarvisio.
Architect Espen Surnevik chose the American typology of the A-frame lodge because it is "both intimate in its width and monumental in its height, and represented something basic with its triangular shape."

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.