83 Exterior Metal Roof Material Small Home Design Photos And Ideas

Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
"Radical sustainability
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
Smart storage tactics are combined with a U-shaped sofa to maximize space in this delightful tiny home.
After: The barn’s original framing was kept for its agricultural character. Faulkner Architects applied an exterior envelope of salvaged redwood and added a Cor-Ten steel roof that will patina over time.
If you’re traveling to Puglia in Italy, one of the most iconic sights are trulli (trullo is the singular), an ancient hut that's specific to the Itria Valley in the Apulia region of Southern Italy. Made with dry stone, trulli date back to medieval times.
New entry with easy access for all
Black-framed windows and doors tie in with the black metal roof and dark chimney.
The tongue-and-groove wood boards are divided at the half-height by a contrasting, black steel plate.
A simple material palette of wood, steel, and glass clads the exterior of each house.
The simple structures are a modern play on the traditional cabin with wood-clad exteriors and gabled roofs.
At under 100 square feet, the 8' x 12' Site Shack includes just the essentials: a wood-burning stove, a desk, and storage.
Spurred by the city’s generous ADU incentives and a desire to reduce their environmental footprint, a couple—he an architect and she a construction engineer—designed and built an elegant, 624-square-foot backyard home with sustainability at its core. Scott Mooney and Lauren Shumaker’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland. The couple plans to track the energy use of their new-build’s electric equipment and appliances. The data will inform the size of their photovoltaic array they'll add to offset the energy costs of the ADU and the bungalow.
Faulkner likes how the new building acts to "fit like a glove over the top" of the old one, so the memory of what was there is preserved.
The doorway on the left accesses an entry porch, which can be closed with the sliding door. The screened porch is the stepped-down volume on the right.
"The building form was intentionally asymmetric and clad in hand-stained, split-face shakes and metal," says Campos Studio.
Now that the daughter lives just steps away from her mother, Campos says, "The laneway has reunited the family and provided a house that reflects their cultural heritage in a subtle but significant way."
The 200 square foot house takes advantage of a tiny strip of greenery outside the front entry to the home. The sliding glass window allows for interactions with their neighbors and those passing by on the street. The entry to the home is actually off to the side.
The mobile office evolved into what is now dubbed the Site Shack. "It’s generally very comfortable," says Patrick Powers of Powers Construction. "It really is an amazing work space, and something we can have fun with."
The 1000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The façade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” said Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The home's modular design is composed of an outer shell and an interior core unit that contains essential living functions, such as a bed, bathroom, and a small kitchenette.
The new, semi-custom PreMade mobile units can be used in a variety of applications.
The Site Shack in a pristine natural setting in British Columbia.
Pick-up points on the exterior allow the Site Shack to be transported by crane with ease.
The Site Shack is seamless in appearance without visible fasteners.
A tough, rusted steel exterior holds up against the elements of a construction site.
Powers Construction uses the Site Shack as a space to meet with homeowners and discuss the project.
Powers Construction originally developed the compact and contemporary Site Shack as a mobile workspace for their residential job sites.
This elevated prefab cabin in the Chilean Andes has a buffer zone that helps protect it against harsh climatic conditions.
Brian and Joni Buzarde’s self-designed home sits on a customized chassis by PJ Trailers that’s just eight and a half feet wide. The 236-square-foot trailer is clad in cedar.
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
A strip of clerestory windows brings in lots of natural light to the living room, while their high sills encourage privacy from the lane.
Guest House
Constructed on land he had owned for years, this tiny cabin is also totally green.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
Clear Rock Lookout seen at dusk.
Lemmo Architecture and Design received a 2017 AIA Austin award for the Clear Rock Lookout, one of their first commissions.
A low-impact design approach informed the compact, elevated footprint and grated metal walkways. Rainwater is channeled from the roof (covered in local stone) into a rain barrel.
In contrast to the glazed writer's studio, the hunting blind is punctuated by two thin windows.
Fronted with full-height, double-glazed openings, the studio frames east-facing views of the creek-bed and beyond.
Blackened, recycled wood slats define the front entry alcove. "The design of House A was originally intended to challenge the status quo of oversized and low-quality housing in Western Australia," say the architects.
Soft gray concrete, a polycarbonate screen, and metal roof bedeck the simple front facade of House A. Not immediately apparent? An underground water collection tank and solar panels. "We used a really high recycled content mix for our tilt-up concrete walls, which have 65-percent slag [a byproduct of steel production] instead of high-carbon emitting Portland cement," say the architects.
A 669-square-foot, one bedroom, one bedroom guest unit, the Trillium is a zero-net energy house with a large outdoor storage closet.
Because the studio does not have air-conditioning, it relies on natural ventilation for passive cooling. Its north orientation harnesses good solar gains.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
The chiflonera leads to the entrance of the cabin.
Even though the house can be connected to the city grid, it also has solar panels that collect energy from the sun and can produce its own energy.
A self sustainable, eco friendly, Australian made tiny home.
We're focused on every detail.
The neighboring garden cottage originally was Randolph’s law office. This space shares a garden with the old carriage house.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.