166 Exterior Metal Roof Material Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

Taking inspiration from the tradition of the Danish sommerhus, each volume is a simple, gabled form, clad in dark gray-stained cedar siding with standing-seam metal roofs that mirror the vertical grooves in a similar shade.
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
Site placement was a lengthy process as the architects searched to optimize seclusion and spectacular views. Specialists, including ecologist Mark Wapstra, were brought on board to survey the site and ensure minimal landscape impact.
The south side with reclaimed frosted glass and operable windows.
The cabin is composed of six prefabricated modules placed side by side atop a six-meter long iron frame.
On the first floor of Casa R is a woodshed and a "chiflonera." This area between the interiors and exteriors is commonly found in Chilean/Patagonian homes, as it helps to regulate the region’s extreme temperature changes.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
Lagos has raised the cabin above the ground on supporting steel to avoid damaging any of the existing trees on site.
The home is spread across two floors.
Nicknamed "The Spaceship," the small UFO-inspired cottage includes a tiny utility kitchen, bathroom, and storage.
Some pavilions overlook the water, while others are nestled further into the coastal bushland.
The exterior Red Ironbark cladding was charred—using the Shou Sugi Ban technique—to increase the longevity of the timber and as a nod to the significance of fire.
"Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day," explain the architects. "They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass."
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
"The forms interpret the township’s alpine setting using height, volume, and pitch to create a dynamic experience as one moves between buildings and between internal spaces," says Allfrey. "Openings are carefully placed to ensure a casual connection between buildings."
Three separate structures surround an elevated dining platform and sunken terrace. Each of these buildings contains its own sleeping areas, which allows a degree of privacy and independence for family members and guests.
Black steel covers the steeply pitched roof, while the exterior walls are wrapped in charred cedar.
The 700-square-foot cabin features a steeply pitched roof that is nearly 23 feet in height.
The architects say that the mirrored finish hasn't caused any problems with the local wildlife.
The cabin is surrounded by a thick forest of birch and spruce.
A view of the cabin from the frozen lake. Here, the existing property can be seen to the right of the cabin.
forrest view
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.
The prefab cabin is a 40-minute hike from Kandalaksha.
Energy-efficient VELUX windows have been installed in the south-facing glazed wall.
The cabin is located in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, just a 30-minute drive from Reykjavík, and can only be accessed by car. The area is remote, private, and quiet, making it ideal for viewing the Northern Lights at night, as well as hiking during the day.
In addition to the hot tub, there is also a 129-square-foot outdoor terrace on site with a small table and two chairs for al fresco meals.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
A large pitched-top door, and a small pitched-top window are cut out from each of the four sides of the chalet’s exterior walls.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The chalet is built entirely out of Jura forest Fir wood planks.
“The factory-built modules were carefully transported up winding roads and set in place without harming a single tree,” adds the firm.
Each cabin was assembled from single, mostly completed modules craned into place and raised atop concrete piers. The cabins include a bedroom and bathroom, a study desk, a  covered porch and a fire pit.
The exterior siding is in a traditional board and batten style, then accented with a steel roof and windows.
The couple wanted the cabin to mesh with its beautiful natural surroundings. "To us this meant small," says Kenny. "We wanted the design to put you right into the landscape, and by making it small we feel drawled by the night sky and mountains that surround us."
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
The profile is also a reference to rural sheds common throughout the countryside.
Chin abstracted a simple gable form—a profile which is more common in the area—to create a more contemporary asymmetrical profile.
The roof overhang is painted white to bounce more light indoors.
A short set of stairs leads up to the glazed entrance of the Week’nder.
The three-bedroom home's gabled roof mimics the shape of a tent.
The Week’nder was constructed from two prefabricated modules.
The exterior is coated in Sherwin Williams Solid Wood stain.
Erecting a modern cabin where a tool shed once stood became a family exercise for architect Jim Cutler and his daughter, Hannah, who worked with him on the design and build.
The 925-square-foot house Maggie Treanor calls home blends into the landscape somewhat; with a galvanized steel shed roof and siding, it looks like a high-design little brother to the barns on the surrounding farms.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. “I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in,” he says.
Instead of installing rooftop solar panels, Alqadi and his friend and partner in the venture, Hillary Flur, built a “solar tree” to provide energy.
The void between the cabins was an integral part of Alqadi’s vision for a retreat that fosters communion with the environment. A ladder affixed to the side of the smaller cabin leads to the stargazing portal. Electromagnetic shutters are operated via an iPad.
Lightweight corrugated zinc roof sheeting clads the exterior.
David Ferguson of Kimo Estate took construction into his own hands in a two-person owner-builder team.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.