2224 Exterior Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

Forty-seven years ago, Peter and Turkey Stremmel opened Stremmel Gallery, one of the first fine-art showplaces in Reno. They went on to exhibit work there by such luminaries as Wolf Kahn, Charles Arnoldi, and Phyllis Shafer. The same architect who designed the gallery, Mark Mack, designed their home, a cluster of colorful cubes in the mountains above the city.
Tapped by art collectors to design an inspirational residence in rural Montana, Jackson Hole–based Carney Logan Burke Architects crafted a modern house that frames the property’s extraordinary landscape views.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
Inspired by historic American farmhouses, this modern dwelling is sited at the base of the Rocky Mountain Foothills in West Boulder, Colorado. Designed by Surround Architecture, the 6,800-square-foot property features a unique layout that makes the best use of its one-acre site, while also responding to its long driveway access.
Designed by Portland-based Skylab Architecture, the 4,200-square-foot Owl Creek Residence in Snowmass, Colorado, has an unusual, triangulated floor plan that responds to the height and slope constraints of the site.
The library pop-out also provides cover for the back door.
An expansive, elevated deck creates a more graceful connection to the house.
The architects installed a new front porch. Fifty percent of the original roof framing was kept with a new standing-seam metal as a cover.
Now the facade is distinguished by bright yellow and soft gray paint, and oversize windows.
All of the labor and materials to build the homes were graciously donated, meaning that the design couldn't be too extravagant and work well with the given materials. Community First! wanted each home to feel warm and welcoming, but also be relatively maintenance-free.
"The main issue with site planning is the units are relatively dense out there," Taylor says. "The building has to take advantage of sun orientation and seasonal breezes, but also have privacy. This site, in particular, was also next to a swale so there are many insects during the summer months."
Community First! has anchored itself within the community through partnerships with various businesses, other nonprofits, faith organizations, and local schools, offering its residents opportunities for success in every aspect of their lives.
The design team made extensive use of Australian hardwood—both internally and externally— to reference the rural setting.
The home is called The Barn, as it was inspired by the American barns that the couple admired on travels throughout the United States.
Ada, a second design by Norske Mikrohus, measures 205 square feet and is set on wheels.
Vilde is a 237-square-foot tiny home designed by Norske Mikrohus, an Oslo, Norway–based design-build firm.
"Our primary focus is to offer quality tiny homes at an affordable price," says David Reiss-Andersen, who cofounded the Oslo, Norway–based tiny home company Norske Mikrohus with his wife Jeanette, who’s also the firm’s lead designer. "There’s growing awareness of compact living, minimalism, and sustainability," David says. "We want to help provide people with the freedom that comes with living with fewer things, lower costs, lower energy use, and less waste."
The living space extends out into the small backyard through large bifold doors. Horizontal weatherboards and vertical Mini Orb steel cladding creates a graphic, minimal rear facade that contrasts with the surrounding inner-city environment.
From the rear laneway, the parapet and veranda awning echo the original pitched roof, carrying the essence of the old house through to the addition.
The original building had been painted red and the client initially wanted to expose the old brickwork. After removing the paint, however, it was discovered that the entire facade was coated in tar. As a result, the decision was made to repaint the facade in cream. The new volume is hinted at by the portion of black framing that is visible at the side of the home.
These steps lead to the rooftop garden. They run alongside the master bathroom, which features a glazed corner detail inspired by Carlo Scarpa's Canova Museum.
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
The planted grass roofs are a recreation of the landscape that existed before the home was built. They are dynamic landscapes that change with the seasons.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Off-shutter concrete is created by removing the shuttering—normally wooden planks used as a temporary structure to contain setting concrete. "Casting the perfect texture of old wooden planks on the concrete, while getting all the services placed correctly inside the shuttering, was an Herculean task," says Daffonchio.
The material palette is almost exclusively "off-shutter" concrete, both inside and outside. The main metal elements are crafted from raw steel.
Monaghan Farm is a 1,300-acre eco-estate about an hour north of the center of Johannesburg. The architectural and environmental guidelines for the estate outline that only 3% of the land will ever be built on.
<span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The architect couple's h</span><span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">ouse, which sits at the edge of a meadow, marks the first time the award-winning designers have integrated ground-up architecture and interior fittings so closely.</span>
The expansive glazing allows the occupants to appreciate not just the views, but shifting light and shadow play throughout the day.
The region’s famous West Cornwall Covered Bridge is one of the many vernacular inspirations for the house’s pitched-roof form.
The triangulated architecture fits into the rugged Appalachian landscape.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
Sculptural olive trees frame the house, which is woven with its natural setting.
An outdoor shower on the northern elevation lets the residents spend practical time in the landscape.
A colored ventilation system on the upper portion of the eastern elevation expels warm air and helps to cool the home's interior. The metal siding below the vents folds open and facilitates outdoor connection and more air circulation.
The home's simple silhouette and sloped metal roof references historical agrarian-style architecture that dots rural landscapes throughout the globe.
"The porch was designed to use most of the concrete slab surface," Sopeoglou says. "The metal panels fold out from the kitchen and allow for maximum openness. I removed the structural column from the corner so the space is free from obstruction, and the clients can enjoy the views when they gather during lunchtime."
"The architectural reference for using metal sheets is the existing sheepfolds and sheds which were scattered around these hills before any of the summer vacationers settled here," Sopeoglou says. "One can still hear during the day distant sounds of bells from the herds feeding on the land."
In order to leave the hills intact, the builders excavated uphill and added a steel-grated bridge to connect the upper sleeping level to the hillside and the adjacent tack barn.
The eastern side of the home gets beautiful views and the morning sun. The fireplace and chimney, foreign to the barn typology, are connected to the building with glazed joints.
The home features sustainable heating and cooling, plus enhanced glazing, insulation, and efficient mechanical systems to mitigate overall energy use.
"We've operated a lot in the mountains with concrete and steel, and it was really rewarding to work on a warm, wooden building with an agricultural reference," architect Greg Faulkner says.
The home features a flat roofline, and it’s composed of stained red cedar, concrete, and basalt—materials that weather well and blend seamlessly with the land.
Many of the windows face the herb garden.
The light bronze aluminum finish of the protruding window frames were inspired by traditional farm windows that typically feature bright colors.
A rooftop terrace tops the tallest building.
"The idea is that everything within the circle is designed and man-made and all that is outside the circle is this ‘listed’ nature, the landscape," explain the architects of the circular pathway that surrounds the buildings. "The circle functions as an edge, that is also a place. A boundary between landscape and garden. It places the house and garden in the landscape. A place to have a deep breath of fresh air after a busy day. The clients told us that the circle is used almost daily to move around the house. It’s very interesting to see how people appropriate the design and how they give new meaning and attributes."

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.