2235 Exterior Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 3

On the interior, Oceanair blinds are used as window coverings.
With the exterior in good condition, the aluminum hull didn’t need much work other than prepping for its new coat of Sprinter Blue Grey.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
“Every single part of the Living Vehicle design and engineering is completely new for 2020,” says Matthew. “It has a 100% aluminum structure, frame, and floor—with no wood products part of the structural system. It also has outstanding insulation design, with extensive thermal testing for very hot and very cold travel.” The Living Vehicle is wrapped in anodized, marine-grade aluminum that is highly weather-, water-, and scratch-resistant.
Sited in a small forest clearing near the Kattegat seashore in Denmark, Vibo Tværveh is a contemporary take on traditional Danish cabin and barn architecture. The tube-shaped structure is cladded in pine and topped with rolled steel plates.
"The home has a very organic design," Ana says. "It’s almost like a Frank Lloyd Wright where everything just melts into the background."
"The home is angled to capture the winter sun and the summer shade," Ana says.
The front door is a near-perfect color match to the site’s purple mountain laurel blooms.
The property, which is a good 10-15 minutes from the center of San Marcos, "is at the end of a dead-end road and has this remote feeling. They really wanted a home that felt connected to nature and a place where they could enjoy the mountain laurels and views," Nance says.
The palette of limestone, glass, and steel creates an old-meets-new look.
The couple, who both have engineering backgrounds, enjoyed sharing their ideas with the architects. The result is their Hill Country dream home.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
ÖÖD offers a range of “mirror houses”—tiny prefab cabins that are often used as guest houses, countryside getaways, and Airbnb accommodations. So far they’ve built projects in 12 different countries, including Estonia, Finland, and Norway. The ÖÖD Iceland home is a bespoke design, based on the clients’ wishes and strict local building requirements. These impacted everything from the dwelling’s structural properties and energy efficiency to the pitched roof.
“Cath and I’ve worked on a bunch of renovation projects,” Ryan says. “We have fun and enjoy working together—it’s our shared hobby.”
“The result is an unusual, simple, and monochrome architecture exploring the purity of the square,” note the architects.
The project’s only splurge was the installation of Shalwin tilt and turn aluminum windows, which cost twice as much as standard windows.
The property slopes approximately 25% from the main road to the lake.
The Poisson Blanc home is topped with an economical white-painted steel roof and clad in standard white-painted pine.
Designed and constructed over the course of two years, the three-bedroom holiday home is oriented to face the lake and slightly angled toward the south to optimize solar gain.
The clients’ one-acre property is located right on the edge of Lake Poisson Blanc, a large water reservoir. “It feels very quiet, isolated, and tranquil,” says Rasselet of the remote area. “It’s an extraordinary place for kayaking and fishing.”
While the cabin was built for year-round use, its location in the village of Petite-Rivière-Saint-François in Québec, Canada, makes for a cozy winter retreat while skiing at nearby slopes.
Seemingly carved out of the sloping roofline, the terrace is clad in contrasting birch plywood.
To the left, the home's main entrance is nestled underneath the sloping roof. Views of the river from a large terrace reference the expansive perspective from a ship's upper deck.
Cabin A by Bourgeois / Lechasseur architectes is perched on the mountainside overlooking the Saint Lawrence River in Québec, Canada. The "A" in the name references the nautical alphabet of the International Code of Signals (ICS), while the home's angular form was derived from the maritime Alfa signal flag and the shape of a ship's sail facing the wind.
Oasis Tiny House, clad in teal-painted plywood and a metal roof that's pitched in the front and curved in the rear, was designed and built by Ellie and Dan Madsen of Paradise Tiny Homes in Keaau, Hawaii.
BVDS Architecture didn’t do any work to the exterior, apart from the box dormer which is clad in tiles to meet permitted development requirements. "From the outside, I think some people would regard the extension as a mistake, as it defies logic to build something that is only half a floor high," says architect George Bradley.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
A sequence of steel beams and columns supporting the first-floor addition extend 1.5 meters from the home, creating an outdoor terrace beneath. Clear polycarbonate sheeting is installed between two of the beams, protecting the terrace from rain and sun.
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The dairy is juxtaposed against the “modern industrial” extension, which is clad in Cemintel Barestone panels. The original facade and windows of the dairy bring a unique character to the project.
When envisioning the perfect home for their family, Kiley and Jim agreed that accessibility was paramount—access to the outdoors, and access for their daughters, Langley and Boelyn, who have special needs and rely on their wheelchairs to get around. After purchasing a narrow lot in Downers Grove, Illinois, the couple reached out to Chicago-based firm Kuklinski + Rappe Architects to design a residence that would serve their daughters, their son Huck, and their own various needs. Crafted to adapt to the family's lifestyle over the years, the home will provide lifelong health and happiness.
The home is located in Martis Camp in Truckee, California, north of Lake Tahoe.
Nestled within a forested site, the home is the perfect getaway for a family and their relatives and friends.
The Lookout House was constructed over a span of five years from start to finish.
Usually, it's the gorgeous stretch of coastline that gets attention in Montecito, but here it's the mountains. Ample outdoor perches allow guests to revel in it.
Fusing the residence with its stunning backdrop was a priority for architect Dan Weber. It also stands out from the area’s abundance of estates with rolling gardens. "The shou sugi ban works really well with the native California landscape," he says. "The oak trees’ canopy is dark forest green."
Minim Homes are wrapped in beautiful shiplapped cypress that will gently age to gray—and they can be outfitted with 960-watt solar systems to go entirely off grid. Production of the homes is currently on hold, but interested parties can purchase plans on Minim’s website.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.