2239 Exterior Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

The Hansons crafted the front door from a single slab of yellow cedar. The circular window in the door mimics a ship porthole and features hand-blown colored glass.
The hexagonal backyard studio that Marlin and Ryan Hanson, of Hanson Land & Sea, designed and built in British Columbia, Canada, is clad with western red cedar shakes and a metal roof.
Living in a remote cabin poses challenges in the cold winter months. “The latest challenge is keeping the two 1000-liter backup rainwater tanks in the shed at the back of the house from freezing,” says the owner. “I experimented this winter with installing a doc-fan ventilation system in the connecting wall that pushes heat from inside the house to the shed to keep it hovering just above freezing point.”
Amid the current crisis, it’s natural to long for an escape—and the severe, otherworldly beauty of Joshua Tree in Southern California may have more of a pull than ever. Whether you’re looking to book a long-term stay or bookmarking places in anticipation of future travel, these Airbnbs offer up Southwestern vibes in a sprawling, desert landscape. Read on for our top picks—from the architectural wonder that is Acido Dorado to Instagram-famous digs and hidden gems.
Locally milled cypress siding, a naturally rot-resistant wood, will darken over time.
Solar panels populate the upper roof, and a double-height atrium in the middle helps to break up the home's massing.
A covered front porch spills out to the yard and anchors the house to the site.
The owner is a freelance documentary filmmaker who found that city living was stifling his creativity. “I have always been more creative in a vast space,” he says. “So, being surrounded by wilderness really attracted me.” It was important that the surrounding forest not be dramatically impacted by the build, and only five trees were removed during the construction.
The owner was motivated to build his own home to avoid a mortgage and to gain the know-how to undertake his own maintenance and repairs. “I was craving the personal challenge to cultivate a home for myself,” he says. “As it was the beginning of a new adventure, I wanted it to be personal. Also, practically speaking, if I built each piece of the home by hand, I would have a good sense of how to solve problems or improve it, without having to ask anyone else to journey through the forest, down the trail, and up the cliff to make an adjustment.”
A timber palette emphasizes indoor/outdoor living. The outdoor cedar deck visually extends the interior white oak floors. The ceilings and soffits are made of hemlock.
Designed for energy efficiency, the home features insulation above code and hydronic radiant heating. Note the Morso 6148 wood-burning stove in the entry hall that’s fueled by locally felled lumber.
Completed in 2018 on a 2.6-acre site in the San Juan Islands, the two-bedroom modular home was installed in a day.
This house’s success lies in it being true in a number of ways – to architectonic and material expression, to site and to the occupants’ ways of life.
“It was a careful process to demolish what we didn’t need, but keep everything we could of the original cottage,” Rhodes says. The builders took extra time to make sure everything was perfect, as the clients are sensitive to external elements like mold and dust. All of the paint and finishes are VOC-free.
The first Plant Prefab–built modular lightHouse ADU was completed earlier this spring in Sebastopol, California. This 423-square-foot lightHouse was completed for around $285,000. That figure breaks down to approximate costs of $210,000 for design, engineering and production; $60,000 for infrastructure and site work; and $15,000 for shipping and installation.
Pictured is a rendering of a 570-square-foot 2X lightHouse with a one-bedroom unit stacked atop a two-car garage.
Window shutters, planted window boxes, white-painted cedar siding, and an industrial-style metal sconce enliven the exterior the farmhouse-style tiny home.
The cedar-clad tiny house Emma McAllan-Braun and Joel Braun created with Mint Tiny Homes features a pine deck with a stock tank swimming pool.
Whipplewood’s North facade. “There’s always people coming out to the house to hang around and be on the water. It was a house for one person, but it had to have a lot of social space—that was the idea with the cantilever decks and all the glass,” explains architect Eric Sokol.
“The recycled brick honors the fabric of the existing cottage whilst adding robustness and patina to complement the rugged terrain of the lake reserve,” say the architects. Only recycled bricks were used in the new construction.
Perforated anodized aluminum operable screens mitigate solar glare. The home features a mix of low-E and bushfire-rated toughened glass set within nonflammable frames.
The space sandwiched between the existing cottage and the new rear addition has been transformed into a north-facing courtyard that brings light and views of greenery into the living spaces.
The renovated home is topped with Colorbond metal roofing with a debris-shedding gutter design.
The brick vents, openings, and chimney flue are protected from falling embers.
“The new addition encloses a series of crafted interiors, each deceptively spacious despite the modest footprint, and designed to offer a heightened experience of landscape from within an intimate setting,” explain the architects. “Large sections of the facade slide fully away, allowing living areas to merge into the surrounding garden, and for the edge of the bathroom and bedrooms to vanish into the forest context.”
The original home was a parson’s residence built over 150 years ago that had undergone a series of small remodels in the eighties and nineties. This new intervention retained the exterior detail at the front and updated the paint scheme.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.
The previous home on the Park Terrace site was damaged in the earthquake and subsequently demolished. Architect Phil Redmond, director of PRau, used this project to explore an archetypal industrial form which was lost as a result of the earthquakes.
On the first story, the walls facing the carport are entirely opaque for total privacy.
The home’s board-formed concrete exterior walls exude a rustic, imperfect quality.
Tall trees and an extended roof canopy provide the house with plenty of privacy.
From the street, the house is shielded from inquisitive eyes.
A tall tree grows through a large aperture in the mono-pitched roof, bringing an outdoor feel to the inside of the house.
The home’s simple, abstract shape contrasts with neighboring homes, which are mainly clad in terra-cotta roof tiles.
The mono-pitched roof is made from timber battens and Lysaght Kip-lock steel roofing.
A nighttime view reveals the glow of the pink interior and the entrance open to the backyard.
“A conglomeration of boxes around a bit of a pitched roof” is how Mark describes his transformation of the 1920s Los Angeles bungalow. Inverting the traditional layout, he set the private rooms in the front and a large, open living area in the rear.
A gravel path leads from the dining area to a bridge across the restored creek that runs along one side of the house.
A centuries-old blue oak stands near the intersection of the two wings of the house, which is clad in Alaskan yellow cedar. “We decided to split the house into two volumes to let in light and allow us to be more nimble with where we placed the structures.” Jess Field, the architect.
Says Krista, “We needed to know that whatever we built would not take away from the landscape.”
On a lot studded with old-growth oaks and redwoods and crossed by a creek, Ian and Krista Johnson asked Field Architecture to design a house that would defer to its natural surroundings.
"Radical sustainability
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
Charred Siberian timber complements the original brick home.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
An outdoor shower on the rear gable of the house is used for rinsing off from the pool or after an outdoor excursion—or for a quick wash down for their two rescue dogs.
Upon receiving this 98-square-foot Caravel from Ohio, the couple demolished the interior in a few days. "We had two good friends visiting, and the four of us picked up the entire shell and moved it off the frame," says Oliver. "It was such a rush and so empowering to do that as a team of women." The silver shell had to be removed to execute a full chassis repair and replacement by a certified welder.
“Mill-finished aluminum cladding was allowed for fast and efficient construction, and it also creates soft reflections of the garden and the ever changing color of the sky in its surface,” says the firm.
Previously, the residents needed to go down a steep staircase to reach the garden. The new extension lowers the floor level to make the landscape much more accessible.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
Metal details accent the home’s pared-down material palette.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.