22 Exterior Green Roof Material Flat Roofline Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

Winkelman Architecture delivers grown-up summer-camp vibes with this unassuming retreat on the coast of Maine.
The firm wanted the materiality of the cabin to be "in harmony with the site," says Shaw. "So, that over time, the building could weather gracefully and the site around it would change, and they would do so in tandem."
The materials were kept simple: a foundation of board-formed concrete that reveals the wood grain of the boards used to make it, Cor-Ten steel siding that will develop a characterful patina, and rafters made of hemlock, a local species. "In terms of materials, we wanted the full exterior of the building to be something that would weather gracefully, that required very little maintenance, and that had a long life cycle," says Shaw.
Sited on a rock ledge, the Far Cabin’s screened porch cantilevers over the forest floor for a tree house effect.
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
"We were interested in this idea of treading lightly on the site. Using a green roof is a logical extension of that.  When you introduce a building that supplants a little piece of the forest floor, it's nice to replicate that on the roof as a return gesture to continue to create habitat for birds, animals,  and plants, and to help manage the flow of storm water," explains McFarlane.
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
One of the main goals of the construction was to do as little harm as possible to the existing environment, which includes waterways that salmon depend upon. Herrin and his team created a garden roof that covers the full extent of the home to meet this objective. “This helps control storm water runoff and also replaces lost insect habitat—insects being a critical food source for juvenile salmon,” he says.
Poteet describes the space as “unbearably hot” before he used spray-foam insulation between the exterior walls and the interior bamboo. “Now it’s the equivalent of a steel ice chest,” he says.
Mill Valley Cabins
Mill Valley Cabins
Balancing on irregular, rough-hewn rocks along the Norwegian coast, this renovated summer cabin near a town called Larvik in Vestfold County intelligently navigates a challenging terrain to take full advantage of dramatic views.  
Located just about 16 feet from the sea, Lille Arøya—a 807-square-foot summer cabin—perches on a small, rugged island.  
Oslo-based practice Lund Hagem Architects took on the challenge, drilling solid galvanized steel columns straight into the rock to provide stable support for the house on the uneven ground. They built a new structure that consists of two volumes:a lower post-and-beam volume where the bedrooms and bathrooms are located, and a taller volume with a large, cantilevered roof with wind-bracing gables that serves as shelter for the living, kitchen, and dining areas.  
Glulam beams are used inside and out, and both interior and exterior walls are clad in rough sawn ore pine.  Together with the raw steel columns and white concrete fireplace, the wood defines the color and mood of the interiors. The uniform aesthetic of the cabin's interior and exterior dissolves the threshold between indoor and outdoor spaces—and further connects the structure with its stunning, coastal landscape.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.