2366 Exterior Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Scott MacFiggen and Regina Bustamante, tech industry veterans from Silicon Valley, called on architect Christi Azevedo to rebrand a fusty house in San Francisco’s Noe Valley, starting with the street view. Cedar boards, charred using the Japanese technique shou sugi ban, replaced plywood siding.
Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
Set on a 17,000-square-foot lot, the home commands impressive views in Silver Lake.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
Nine shipping containers form the basis of this new multigenerational house near Denver.
Designed by Olson Kundig with interiors by Geremia Design, False Bay Residence takes cues from the surrounding agricultural buildings on the site. A steeply pitched roof, open interior, loft space, and overall height resonate with the vernacular of the area.
The house has an exposed wooden structure and a large terrace with wide steps set over the basement of the original house.
The wood siding gives the house a cabin-like aesthetic.
The trailer is set on wheels, so the home is easily relocatable, and can be registered as a caravan.  A power drill winds the slide-out inward and outward.
The Sojourner tiny house was built atop a high-quality, galvanized trailer chassis.
The welcoming home has many original features that Eichler purists seek.
3767 Barrington Drive features a classic Eichler profile and an inviting bright orange front door.
The exterior of the new, two-story home in East Austin, Texas was designed with a minimal palette, bronze windows, and steel details in order to blend into the existing cityscape.
MRTN renovated and re-roofed the historic timber bungalow, returned it to its original condition, and added some raised planter boxes in the front yard.
The roofline of the breezeway is raised to allow for clerestory glazing.
The sinuous Western Red Cedar wall is steel-framed with wood infill studs.
“Even when the Kirio system is not connected to the router, it’s constantly downloading information about energy usage.” —Tiffany Bowie, architect
The charred cedar exterior gently basks in the Alaskan sun.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
The solar panels on the roof often get covered in a heavy layer of snow, but with periodic clearing, they are as effective during the sunny days of winter as they are during fairer weather.
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named "Ufogel," which is a melding of the acronym UFO and "vogel," meaning bird in German.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
A sprawling deck on the second story takes up more than half the footprint of the home.
Wood shutters can be closed to create a seamless exterior.
Rocks sourced from a local quarry create a supportive stone wall that cuts into the sloped terrain.
 Matika Architecture's mountain hut is located in the mountains of Slovakia
The building is clad in horizontal shot-blasted larch boards and vertically oriented galvanized steel fins. The cladding varies in height and width to create a patterned facade.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
A compact and vertical guest tower is sited at the western corner of the lot amongst tall evergreens, allowing for a more private guest experience, more compact floor plan, and the ability to effectively shut off (socially and energy-wise) the guest spaces zone by zone during typical daily use.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
Rios asked architect Reynolds to derive a design from the shipping containers. The duplex takes the shape of stacked volumes clad with vertical and horizontal Hardie boards. The covered patio features clear-coated cedar wood.
The modular appearance of the duplex, clad in white Hardie plank siding, mimics the look of a two-story container home. With large windows and 11-foot-tall ceilings, the two-bedroom, three-bath residence feels more spacious than its 1,484 square feet. On the ground floor, the living, dining, and kitchen areas flow into one another; potential guests in the shipping container also have easy access to a full bath of their own. A steel-and-wood floating staircase leads to the second floor, which holds two bedrooms with patio access.
The cabins are made up of two layers of wood construction. The exterior layer is made of Larch wood with a custom glazing.
Stinessen placed each cabin carefully in order to ensure the best possible views and the right amount of privacy.
This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins—one of which juts out from a natural ledge. Each of them fit two to four travelers or a family of five.
A look at the lovely nature-filled backyard.
Front of the home at dusk
Entry to home via bridge
Exterior details
Putting green on the roof deck
Outdoor kitchen (L); Lounge area at the pool (R)
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Street view showing the subtle presence
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
Designed by architects and experienced sailor Kari Leppänen, Honka’s Saari villa was built with 134-milimeter thick square logs treated with a dark finish, and has three-meter wide eaves that provide shade, and wind protection for the outdoor patio.
Honka’s Kippari log homes come with large windows that are perfect for framing beautiful natural sceneries.
This wilderness sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland was built with 112-millimeter thick squrae logs, and has a 1,028-square-foot outdoor terrace.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.