905 Exterior Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

After months of arduous design and construction, Marmol and Becket are thrilled to escape Los Angeles for their idyllic desert retreat.
Mobile sustainability: 

The sliding doors were made in Syracuse by CabFab with a formaldehyde-free plant-and-soy-based composite board manufactured by e2e of Ithaca, New York. The mobile 

partitions were fashioned from TimberStrand, an engineered lumber made from younger trees rather than old-growth timber. 

cabfab.com 

e2ematerials.com 

ilevel.com

An unconventional exterior: The solar screen is made from medium-density 

overlay plywood, a widely available and relatively 

affordable material whose traditional use for highway 

signs testifies to its durability.
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The extension is clad in Colorbond 'Surfmist.'
The Baumann family residence in Gowanus, Brooklyn, is all geometry up front, with a rectilinear grid of steel and cypress comprising the structure’s double facade.
Standing-seam copper siding accentuates sections of the structure that provide shear support for the steel moment frame.
A narrow building next to the main structure houses storage and an outdoor kitchen.
Residents are allowed a small swatch of land to plant gardens.
Guests ascend a staircase into the cabin, while a small lift carries up their luggage.
Here's the cover image in all its glory. Van der Rohe's Farnsworth House is the essential glass house (sorry Philip J) and looks pretty spectacular in the snow. One wonders if those windows are double-paned though. Photo by Jason Schmidt.
Delta Shelter | Olson Kundig
The front deck was designed to
Once a horse stable, this Chicago house first got a superficial makeover from Oprah (we wonder whether Stedman likes modern) before architect Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang was called in for a more substantial renovation and a dazzlingly porous brick screen.
The clients were active participants in the conversation about how to mitigate challenges like street traffic noise (the house is set right on a major thoroughfare) and how to relieve some of the visual pressure of the openness of the front facade. The garage is located below the envelope of the height and coverage-restricted house which results in the floor and driveway level with the street, a critical detail in snow country.
In contrast to the intensity of the front facade is a wood-skin section of the house on the rear facade, containing sleeping areas that cantilever over the outdoor bar and dining area.
The house is anchored to its sloping site through a series of steps that lead from street-level to front entrance, and through the identification of the garage as a central element of the architecture.
For the exterior, Latimer used shou sugi ban charred cedar in addition to the corrugated metal. He says, "The design inspirations are both Japanese and Scandinavian. We wanted it to have a warm and cozy sense of hygge. Funke called it 'sensual design' because it appeals to all the senses."
The tiny home was built on a trailer for easy mobility.
The corrugated exterior echoes an old, corrugated shed on author Cornelia Funke's Malibu property.
Hale and Maisie peer out of one of the living-room windows, from where Edmonds (pictured at left with Pippa) dreams about installing a zip-line directly to their garden patch.
Though not made of stone or brick like the other holiday homes, this two-person escape on Scotland’s picturesque Isle of Skye, designed by Rural Design Architects was made with corrugated metal, a material that is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
Rolling Huts by Olson Kundig

There are a lot reasons to follow Olson Kundig on Instagram. One of them is their seminal Rolling Huts project.
Architect Paul Hinkin and his partner, Chrissy Pearce, bought and restored a 538-square-foot Deckhouse at Emsworth Yacht Harbour in Hampshire, England.
With the help of builder Peter Watts, the couple returned the house to its original early-1970s glory, utilizing the space beneath for both boat and car.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
Leroy tools around on his mini turbo tractor while munching on a gigantic cookie; his parents look on with envy.
Leo Marmol and Alisa Becket enjoy one of their home’s many outdoor spaces.
Marmol and Becket with their daughter, Emilia. The intersecting modules were designed to frame a range of spectacular desert vistas.
Plants found in the surrounding landscape were used to obscure the lines between designed and natural worlds.
Bold, red-colored shipping containers were used to create a (12 meter long) visitor area extension for the National Theatres Company of Korea. Designed as a social zone for theatregoers, the space was equipped with internal sliding partition walls that can be opened or closed to allow for flexible use of the interior spaces.
Kevin Daly Architects created a geometric perforated, folding metal skin supported by an aluminum exoskeleton, which shades the two-story glazed courtyard-facing façade of this home in Venice, California.
To tackle the challenges of a steep slopping site and a tight budget, architect Dan Rockhill used a slatted exterior screen of Cumaru wood to shields inexpensive metal sidings for this Kansas home.
Using insulted metal panels that were rejected from the construction of a tennis center nearby, this sustainable home in Kansas by Studio 804 was inspired by the prefab Lustron houses that were developed in the United States after World War II.
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
It takes three to five days to install a Vipp Shelter onsite.
Owners Rachel and Nolan Ploegman's sons, Alex and Logan, run along the perimeter of their Parallelogram House in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Its raw shell and stretched geometry were conceived by 5468796 Architecture and executed by Concord Projects. Brunswick Steel assisted with the bent-plate Cor-Ten columns.

East St. Paul, Manitoba
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
The main living area is cantilevered into the tree canopy, while bedrooms, bathrooms, service, and storage are located behind a long wall of cabinetry against the hillside.
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Cupertino, California
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Two trunk-like columns support an aluminum-and-zinc-clad home in the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains designed by architect Craig Steely. With an intention to disrupt  as few oak trees on the dense site as possible, Steely built the glass-walled house to  nestle against the steep hillside. Visitors access the entrance from above, descending to the living spaces via a native grass-covered roof.
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Cupertino, California
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Lush landscaping softens the steep driveway that leads to the garage at the base of the house.
Although the couple originally painted the bus with a white and blue color scheme, they are currently repainting the body gray, as the white tends to show dirt. "Bus life is fixing things, tinkering, and constant changing, but we love it," explains Ashley. An 800-watt solar collector on the roof charges four six-volt batteries, which powers the lights, outlets, water pump, and water heater.
On the northwestern tip of Scotland’s Isle of Skye is a vacation rental that's inspired by the region’s traditional “crofter style” cottages, but covered with a skin of tin.  
Designed and built by Gill Smith and Alan Dickson of Scottish practice Rural Design Architects, this house sits along the rugged Isle of Skye coast and has a rudimentary form that recalls children’s drawings of pitched-roof homes.  
Smith and Dickson constructed the house using corrugated metal sheeting, which is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
“Everyone stops to look at the building,” says Motoshi. Neighbors may stare at the severe facade, but once inside they are amazed with the quality and comfort of his home. Its efficient design comes from IDEA Office’s clever rethink of local zoning regulations and required setbacks.
When Abbie and Bill Burton hired Marmol Radziner to design their prefab weekend home, their two requests were “simple-simple, replaceable materials,” says Abbie—such as concrete floors (poured offsite in Marmol Radziner's factory) and metal panel siding—and “the ability to be indoors or outdoors with ease.” Deep overhangs provide shade and protection from rain, so the Burtons can leave their doors open year-round and hang out on their 70-foot-long deck even in inclement weather. They visit the house once a month, usually for a week at a time, with Vinnie and Stella, their rescue Bernese Mountain dogs. Their two adult children occasionally join them. The couple hopes to one day retire here.
Based in Sacramento, CA, TAYNR specializes in prefab homes built from shipping containers.
Project Name: Box Office
Segal’s urban-infill units (like the Titan shown here) eschew typical features like dysfunctional balconies and underground garages.
Pascal and Richie have worked hard to learn the lay of the land around their new house, and to become stewards of their small wetland area, with help from local high school kids.
Resident Richard Kim, who works as the head of design at electric car company Faraday Future, tested his know-how with the creation of his own Los Angeles home, a curvilinear structure clad in Cor-Ten steel and black-stained cedar.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.