1105 Exterior House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The front of the house at night. An exterior stairway alongside the carport leads to the home’s main entrance.
The three-story Blue Lake Retreat is located in Marble Falls, Texas. The residence was designed by Lake Flato Architects to integrate naturally into the steep topography. With living spaces on the top floor and four bedrooms on the two lower floors, the timber structure is connected to the hillside by a bridge and boasts a cantilevered deck that floats just above the lake.
East St. Paul, Manitoba
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
In southern Brazil, a 3,390-square-foot house designed by Barbara Becker and built by Charrua Construções perches on a slope overlooking the city of Pato Branco.
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Pato Branco, Brazil
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
By removing horizontal junctures between the facade and the roof,  architect  Woojin Lim eliminated spaces where dirt and rainwater could settle.
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Sokcho, South Korea
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Clad in a white Hi-Macs acrylic surface, a house belonging to two painters in Sokcho, South Korea, is intended as a blank canvas that captures light and shadow.
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Sokcho, South Korea
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
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Sokcho, South Korea
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
One of the pitched roofs shelters a side deck, which has a SwingLab bench.


Scaly Mountain, North Carolina
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
A family in Hamburg, Germany, turned a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a few exterior tricks, including sheathing the exterior in one-dimensional, murdered-out black.
A family of cost-conscious Hamburgers converted a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a strict budget in place. To unite the quaint masonry of the original villa with the squat, ugly add-on built flush against it, the architects decided to paint the old-fashioned facade graphite gray and then covered the box next door in plain, light-colored larch. Photo by Mark Seelen.
Landscaping was designed by Gardenia Gardens.
Designed in 1960, the house was originally a lodge to accommodate horse trails. Throughout the years, the house has expanded with various additions and renovations.
The public staircase is directly adjacent to the house, though the louvers mitigate the view of passersby in favor of views of San Francisco.
At night, opening the entire top floor is a breeze. Russell-Clarke and Moolsintong are even planning of rigging some kind of sail over the back patio for shade. The hot tub is by Roberts Hot Tubs.
“Peter and I’ve got shockingly similar and far-reaching design inspirations. Our conversations would move easily from brutalism to driftwood 

to kachinas and then flow right back to something applicable to architecture. I can’t tell you how many times I will do that with a less-design-literate client and just get a blank stare!” —Architect Craig Steely
In the outdoor living area, orange Primary Pouf stools by Quinze & Milan and an ipe bench surround the central fire pit. An outdoor kitchen neighbors its interior counterpart. In addition to a grill, it accommodates a table and bench by Kayu.
The living area opens beautifully into the outdoor area, which is a key design element of Eichler homes. Photo by Mariko Reed.
Materials original to classic Eichler homes such as interior wood paneling, aluminum sliding doors, glass walls, and VCT flooring were restored.
Twenty-two 12-foot-wide steel-frame modules were combined to form nine to 14-foot-high rooms that were stacked and bolted together. Ten deck modules added more than 4,700 square feet of sheltered outdoor space. Image courtesy of Jill Paider.
Per Bornstein’s house sits on a hill between a large forested park and Gothenburg’s former industrial area. Much of the surrounding area awaits design as thoughtful and lovely as this home built on a previously abandoned lot.
With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
The master-bedroom addition juts forth like a prow of a ship.
While the slate-clad northern facade has few windows and a steeply pitched roof, the southern facade is dominated by glass with the solar-panel-clad roof strategically angled to catch the sun.
Tonko positioned the "lens" of the building to look over the Rhine Valley below. The owners have considered hanging some of the bronze sculptures outside the window, to allow them to develop a natural patina over time.
The structure is clad in weathered steel with an interior of concrete and untreated oak window frames. Tonko's design is meant to be what he describes as a "delicate workshop," an easy-to-clean, distraction-free space that allow for concentration and creativity.
Friends from Tonko's hometown of Bregenz, Austria, commissioned the studio when they acquired some land next to their home. They use it for drawing and sketching, as well as creating clay and gypsum sculptures that are later cast into bronze. Since the area is close to where he grew up, Tonko was incredibly familar with the view from the hillside.
Architect Christian Tonko played with a double metaphor when designing the Camera Lucida studio. The name of the cantileverd hillside space, Latin for "bright chamber," references the open window facing the valley below, as well as the skylight that bathes the workspace in natural light.
Timber battens were used on north-facing windows to prevent excessive heat in the summer. The exterior is clad in Scyon’s Linea weatherboard and covered in Dylux’s Western Myall paint. Beneath the upper floor, a little nook makes for the perfect covered carport and storage spot for surfboards.
Large gum trees offer a natural barrier for the house. Harkness designed the house's footprint in order to minimize the effect on tree roots. “The retained trees offer a sense of layering and age that new vegetation won’t be able to for a long time,” Harkness says.
Rearyard Extension
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
At night, the entire studio glows like a lantern, its light amplified by the reflection in the seasonal pond. I
The front entrance of the Farley Studio presents a clean, minimalist space—a stark contrast to the colorful clutter of the painting studio hidden behind corrugated-metal walls at the back of the house.
Indoor and outdoor entertaining is made simple by the dining room’s sliding glass doors, but the two spaces also share a literal common ground. Lapicida’s tumbled black limestone with white Carrara marble inserts sprawl from the kitchen, past the dining room, and onto the patio.
Designed by Italian architect Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo, this holiday villa in the Sicilian countryside is intelligently designed so it’s raw wood board louvres can be opened to create a balcony that looks out to the countryside and sea beyond, or closed to maximize interior space.
Built with a steel frame, the Frost House features panels of styrofoam between aluminum sheets for the exterior walls and styrofoam between plywood for the roof and floors. Bold, primary colors accentuate its geometric form.  
Shortly after Karen Valentine and Bob Coscarelli purchased the home in 2016, they began to unearth nuggets of information about its pedigree. Their realtor had provided a brochure that identified the prefab as designed by architect Emil Tessin for the now-defunct Alside Homes Corporation based out of Akron, Ohio, which had held a patent for the structure’s aluminum paneling. Their new neighbors provided a stack of Alside Homes sales materials, floor plans of various models, and even a script that had been written for salespeople during home tours. They determined that the Frost House had been a sales model for the company, and that Tessin had been the son of Emil Albert Tessin, the legal guardian of Florence Knoll.
North facade - the framed box

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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