619 Exterior Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

A family in Hamburg, Germany, turned a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a few exterior tricks, including sheathing the exterior in one-dimensional, murdered-out black.
A family of cost-conscious Hamburgers converted a kitschy turn-of-the-century villa into a high-design home with a strict budget in place. To unite the quaint masonry of the original villa with the squat, ugly add-on built flush against it, the architects decided to paint the old-fashioned facade graphite gray and then covered the box next door in plain, light-colored larch. Photo by Mark Seelen.
Designed in 1960, the house was originally a lodge to accommodate horse trails. Throughout the years, the house has expanded with various additions and renovations.
The public staircase is directly adjacent to the house, though the louvers mitigate the view of passersby in favor of views of San Francisco.
At night, opening the entire top floor is a breeze. Russell-Clarke and Moolsintong are even planning of rigging some kind of sail over the back patio for shade. The hot tub is by Roberts Hot Tubs.
With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
The facade is punctured by a variety of differently sized windows: Those flush to the wall indicate the house’s public rooms, while the those for the private spaces are set back.
Blocked from the wind, a deck at the rear of the house is a favorite place for sunbathing and also shelters planters of herbs.
The master-bedroom addition juts forth like a prow of a ship.
In Washington’s Methow Valley, a modern cabin with an outdoor living room allows views of the surrounding woodland and meadow to perforate its volume.  
By day, the Chechaquo Lot 6 cabin gives the impression of floating in a forest clearing; by night, its windows glow against the wooded darkness. From all vantage points, the landscape permeates this 1,000-square-foot cabin, designed for two outdoor enthusiasts and tucked at the toe of a dramatic slope in Winthrop, Washington.
While the slate-clad northern facade has few windows and a steeply pitched roof, the southern facade is dominated by glass with the solar-panel-clad roof strategically angled to catch the sun.
Designed by Italian architect Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo, this holiday villa in the Sicilian countryside is intelligently designed so it’s raw wood board louvres can be opened to create a balcony that looks out to the countryside and sea beyond, or closed to maximize interior space.
London-based practice De Rosee Sa’s self-built lakeside cabin recaptures the magic of childhood fairytales.  
A labor of love, the 377-square-foot Woodland Cabin is a design/build project completed over multiple trips to the lakeside lot in the village of Nouvelles in southern Belgium. The architects built the cabin using locally-sourced, storm-felled timber to deepen their understanding of materials and construction.  
By taking construction into their own hands and using locally-sourced materials, the team kept within the relatively tight budget of £25,000 ($32,872).   
Simple yet elegant, De Rosee Sa’s self-described
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
Most impressive of all, a solar array on the roof empowers the residents to produce more energy than they consume on-site.
Large floor-to-ceiling windows and doors provide abundant natural light and ventilation.
The designers have incorporated nature via a wall of greenery creating a cozy nook with a sense of privacy and a relaxed vibe.
Oke Hauser and Corinna Natter of MINI LIVING in the Urban Cabin.
Street Entrance
Main Volume
South façade
Main entrance façade
The entire interior wall opens, extending the house visually and socially into the small garden that lies between the multigenerational family’s two homes. The boys’ favorite feature is the soccer goalpost (which doubles as clothesline).
Custom river red gum sliding windows and australian cypress door.
Northern elevation; Australian Cypress, concrete, and river red gum.
An enclosed courtyard, bordred by ipe, is arguably the most distinctive feature of the house that the Phil Kean Design Group created for Adriana De Azevedo, Daniel Coelho, and their two daughters in Winter Park, Florida.
Lake House
Living in the house before starting construction enabled Will and his wife, Jennifer, to acclimate themselves to the area and allowed Will to consider how to make the home accessible to Raul, his daughter’s wheelchair-using foster child.
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Rockport, Massachusetts
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
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Rockport, Massachusetts
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Jason and Suzanne Koxvold commissioned Studio Padron to design a 200-square-foot guesthouse on their Ellenville, New York, property. The geometric structure’s dark cedar cladding contrasts with the inviting interior, which is heated by a cast-iron Jøtul stove. A layer of built-in bookshelves made from felled oak lumber also helps insulate the building in winter.
Apart from a “generous” master bedroom, Mitchell says that the couple also wanted a rooftop deck to see views of downtown Denver. A sloped roof kept the building up to code, and the outdoor deck “was achieved by shifting the upper volume backwards from the front of the house,” he says.
Monogram Modern Home 2016 – San Francisco
#MMHT #SF #monogrammodern
Monogram Modern Home 2016 – San Francisco
#MMHT #SF #monogrammodern
“In this house, the roof is the only facade—the rest is dissolved beneath it.” —Architect Aljoša Dekleva
Main elevation

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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