2524 Exterior Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

When closed, the screens blend in with the cedar siding.
Cutouts in the home’s volumes increase the number of viewing angles.
Set in a valley in Wanaka, New Zealand, the home of winemaker Nigel Greening was conceived as a series of “tubes” that disappear at one end into the sloped landscape. Architect Andrew Simpson of WireDog Architecture worked with Dunlop Builders to create the 3,390-square-foot house, which features rammed-earth walls both inside and out, a reflection of the owner’s connection to the soil.
Kanuka Valley House by WireDog Architecture
Architect Erik Churchill of BLDGWORKS and his brother-in-law, contractor Bill Henry of Field Modifications, teamed up to remodel a late ’70s home outside Philadelphia for Bill, his wife, Allegra, and their sons. The house is near family, including Erik and Allegra’s parents, Tasha Stonorov and Michael Churchill. “We knew it would be a challenge,” says Allegra, “but the opportunity to be close to my parents in a place that could display Bill’s skills and Erik’s design made it irresistible.” Cedar planks wrap a new 900-square-foot extension.
Ryan McLaughlin watches the sunset from the deck of the 160-square-foot tiny home he built, with no prior experience, at his parents’ horse ranch in Georgetown, Texas. Soon, the trailer-mounted cabin will be moved to a vineyard, where it will operate grid-free and be available to rent for short stays.
With prices starting in the low five figures, pretreated shou sugi ban siding was out of the question. "My girlfriend and I spent a week cutting, trimming, burning, scrubbing, and oiling the cedar ourselves," says Ryan. The project cost a total of $550 in materials.
A fiberglass door covers a void in the wall that holds a solar-powered water heater, a propane tank, and wood for a fire bowl.
The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo.
Guillermo, who left the land-scaping mostly natural, is now planting trees to help offset deforestation in the region.
The Premier folding door accounted for a third of the total budget, but Ryan felt it was worth the expense for its unobtrusive frame. “That was the cheapest, thinnest frame I could find—the most invisible door,” he says.
A Milgard awning window provides ventilation.
What was once a working stable, transformed into a modern refuge for work and play.
The lake-level Beach Hut, built by Nathan and Adrianne’s father, further enhances the home’s indoor/outdoor living experience.
Previously, the home had been "a dim, dark, clunky disaster that had been built apparently in direct opposition to light patterns and to views of the lake," says Buhler. Now, the renovated home takes proper advantage of its lakeside setting.
Nicknamed the "lake of a thousand colors" for its brilliant coloration, Kalamalka Lake was a driving inspiration behind the home’s redesign. In a playful nod to the lengthy renovation process, the remodeled house, which now embraces views of the lake, has also been dubbed the "house of a thousand alterations."
Suspended in the forest, the Pinecone tree house is a sight to behold.
Different materials and textures create an interesting facade.
The structure is accessed via a steep wooden ladder and a trap door that unfolds down from the top.
An aerial view of Casa JB shows its three volumes.
The back of the home and gable ends are covered in blackened cedar.
The villa as it fits into the local landscape.
One portion of the roof arches.
The roofs’ concave and convex forms are elegantly layered and integrated into the home's forested setting.
Viewed from above, the home wraps around itself and is folded around a small central courtyard. The roof sections overlap in an organic way, giving the home its name: Four Leaves.
The exterior paint is a custom-blended black that Keasler requested. “I wanted a color that was a little more faded since the chalet has such a modern silhouette. I felt that a true black would be too stark,” she explains. The black contrasts with the whitewashed cedar front porch, which features a Factory Light 4 Outdoor Sconce from Schoolhouse and a vintage chair.
To reduce maintenance needs, the design eschews decks and uncovered outdoor spaces. “We didn’t want the pressure to shovel them off,” explains Sara.
A reclaimed hickory wood facade punctured by windows overlooking the National Forest Service land
The bivouac is designed for minimal environmental impact. It's set on non-permanent foundations and anchored to the rock in a non-invasive way, and it can be removed without leaving a trace.
Although this cabin functions more as a guesthouse than a she shed, there's a lot of design inspiration that can be taken from this guest resort in the forest of Southern Sweden. From its use of wood and glass to its simple, asymmetrical shape, we can easily imagine using the space as a yoga or art studio or home office.
A rear view of the house from the backyard.
Located in Northeast Portland on a 0.12-acre lot, the well-preserved home is clad in board-and-batten cedar siding.
The black steel swing frames a dark window perfectly, lending a modern vibe to the wood exterior. Plants and white decorations break the colors up further.
The living area holds a table with seating for eight. There is also a sideboard, a surface for food preparation, and ample storage compartments for backpacks and climbing equipment. Two wooden sleeping platforms with mattresses can sleep up to eight people, and small solar panels provide minimal lighting.
The shelter can accommodate eight people.
A small external niche at the entrance helps protect the door from wind and snow and provides a small storage space for gear.
High-quality materials guarantee the shelter's durability, and every piece is recyclable and ecologically certified.
The structure is made from wood and steel composite panels, and it's designed to split into four sections for transport and handling to reduce the number of helicopter flights needed for the final assembly.
The high-altitude, remote site called for simple and efficient construction choices and careful logistical planning.
The home is clad in sustainably sourced spotted gum. A natural material palette is used throughout.
Set on a a repurposed foundation just over 20 square feet, this boxy residence clad in oxidized black cedar makes up for its small footprint by embracing the expansive outdoors with large, glazed openings. The two-story cabin houses the bedrooms in the upper level while an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen occupy the ground floor. The home also opens up to an outdoor ipe deck and patio.
Measuring only 180 square feet, this sleek, prefabricated, off-grid tiny home rotates the classic A-frame cabin structure by 45 degrees to create more usable floor space. Sited in Hudson Valley, the sleek, black cabin by BIG and prefab housing startup Klein is the first model in a series of tiny homes that Klein plans to sell directly to consumers.
Set on an expansive meadow and overlooking the sea, Rode House is a semicircular residence on Chiloé Island featuring a dramatic, sloping roof that extends over an interior courtyard. Pezo von Ellrichshausen is a Chilean firm known for their arresting, geometric architecture. In true form, the striking, semicircular residence boasts a roof that drops steeply to form two sharp peaks at either end.
The L-shaped home is a classic example of Frank Lloyd Wright's Usonian style.
At the rear, a large open patio with wood planks and an outdoor eating space allow for indoor-outdoor living.
The retreat is a composition of light and dark, wood and metal. These materials wrap the masses as they hover above the landscape.
The grand property includes forested land, a reflecting pond, and a private pool—all of which can be enjoyed from the picturesque living spaces.
Abercorn Chalet by Guillaume Kukucka and Tux Creative
The roof creates a dialogue with the surrounding landscape through multiple sloped planes, irregular lines, and an absence of overhangs. The home's form appears to change according to one's angle of approach.
The garage doors are finished in the same painted cedar cladding as the external walls, helping them seamlessly blend in.
On the exterior, architect Ron Rea selected a deep black-brown that's not an historically accurate color, but honors the architectural form.
IF House - Photo 12

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.