2125 Exterior House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The house was constructed with a wooden frame and cellulose insulation.
Like the windows, the front door is also a square.
Several square perforations of varied sizes along wooden facade serve as windows.
A view of the extension at night.
The pitched roof reduces the extension's surface area to 12 percent less than that of a flat-roofed extension, creating a more compact building envelope—which translates to less material needed for construction and less space to heat or cool.
Floor-to-ceiling glass with sliding glass doors allow access to the decked outdoor space, covered by the roof's overhang.
In order to meet the project's requirements for both affordability and sustainability, Warc Studio paired glass with laminated timber fins constructed from arsenic free H3 treated laminated radiate pine—a highly sustainable resource locally-sourced from a nearby plantation.
Gated Driveway Entry
A close-up of the black-weathered zinc cladding. Angled walls and an opening in the eave preserves the mature trees on the site.
A shiny mirror-clad shed greets guests as they approach the house.
Californian modernism informs the shape of this Minnesota residence.
The secluded site allows for a high level of transparency in the design.
The mirror-clad shed gives the property a sense of constant movement.
High, glazed walls bring in plenty of natural light.
Hard shell, soft core. The industrial exterior shell wraps up and over the warm interior of the great room.
Once an abandoned building, Firehouse 12 is today full of activity, with a bar, a loft, and a joint music venue/recording studio—one of the few of its kind—contained within its original 6,920-square-foot shell.
New Haven, Connecticut
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
The former knitting mill was built in 1928 and sits in San Francisco's South Beach neighborhood.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
In the tower pod, there’s an open plan master bedroom and bathroom on the top floor with the children’s bedroom, utility, and bathroom underneath. The pod on the opposite end is for guests and can be closed off when they don’t need it.
The home’s design began with a traditional cabin form that broke off from there to split, twist, and rotate into four pods. The residence perfectly blends with the surrounding landscape with its larch lad exterior.
First, a concrete slat was poured into the ground with strategically placed dwarf walls built on top. Working as an adjustable “raft,” a floating structural frame was placed on top of the walls allowing for potential movement. If that happens, there are mechanical jacks placed underneath the frame in case the house needs to be leveled again.
The building's modern exterior cladding contrasts dramatically with the existing ruins.
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
The facade
The vi
Another view of the back of the building.
The balcony on the upper level looks down towards the courtyard.
A solution to cramped urban living in Texcoco, Mexico.
On the upper level, the bedrooms are connected by a narrow balcony.
A traditional trullo home in the town of Cisternino in Italy's Puglia region.
A private gate fronts the entrance to Red Oak Manor.
A Corten steel sculpture designed by the plastic artist Nivaldo Tonon.
A standing seam metal roof wraps down the exterior wall of the home to protect against the harsh winds of the terrain.
A large window wall folds in to create a spacious deck that wraps up and over to become the roof and overhang of the home.
A cutaway in the structure's cubic shape forms a front porch, where a graphic yellow door welcomes visitors. The roof slopes downwards, holding more intimate spaces at its lower end.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.
With invisible foundations, the house appears to hover above a grassy carpet.
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
The natural landscape becomes part of the architecture of Los Terrenos.
In the evening, the facade darkens as the sun sets outdoors.
The larger volume has a peaked roof and a mirrored facade.
The living lounge, dining and kitchen are located within the larger of the two volumes.
A small porch on the southern facade leads down to the lake.
In summer, trees help to filter out some of the heat during the warmer days.
A house by Kengo Kuma near the Great Wall of China.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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