2469 Exterior House Design Photos And Ideas

The atrium-style design perfectly integrates a sense of the outdoors throughout the home.
The atrium door at the front entry (on the right) is painted a light blue—the same accent color that has been used in the home's kitchen and bathroom.
St John's Hill, where this house is situated, is a bustling, youthful street, with shops, restaurants, and bars.
Beautifully designed, these mobile structures are composed of high-quality materials at a more budget-friendly price, along with transportable, easy-to-assemble components.
The end elevation displays the shipping container structure and original doors.
Street view
Exterior view
Outside, the couple clad the house with a rain screen of 1.5-by-1.5-inch strips of spruce to create a “modern rustic barn.” The extra-deep sills of the first-floor window become a bench on the outside and a shelf on the inside.
The rear façade is illuminated at night.
After months spent researching solutions to make her home’s fabric roof functional, Lisa Sette can finally relax.
“We wanted the exterior to be the artwork,” Ryan says.
"We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Craig Bassam of the house he shares with Scott Fellows. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.
The front entrance of the Farley Studio presents a clean, minimalist space—a stark contrast to the colorful clutter of the painting studio hidden behind corrugated-metal walls at the back of the house.
As you ascend towards the roof, the house becomes increasingly transparent.
The house’s street-level entrance shows an openness to its surroundings, and a glass door allows curious passersby a glimpse of the interior.
Even the rear facade is seamless—its door all but disappearing into the cedar cladding.
The outer walkway leads all the way around the structure, spilling into a small patio in back.
The facade achieves a notable sense of verticality for such a stout structure, with its stained-timber cladding aimed straight up toward the sky. The heavy, horizontal brick-work of the neighboring Georgian houses seems to imply aesthetic controversy, but in fact, during its short planning review, Reeve's house received letters of support from no fewer than five neighbors. The front gate opens onto a driveway, which in turn leads to a private patio around back.
Exterior shot of Haase home.
The front deck, invisible from the road, is an extension of the wood paneling in the main living space.
The peaked roofline mimics the mountains beyond.
The Wood House has been made available to rent on AirBnB.
The operable windows can be opened to let in cooling cross breezes.
The exterior is cladded with tun timber, a wood that is native to the region.
The band of glazing separates the timber cladding from the stone base.
A sloped, double-glazed skylight floods the interior with natural light and provides stargazing opportunities at night.
Durable Iroko timber—which when weathered, will match the color tone of the surrounding buildings—has been chosen as cladding for the internal courtyard elevations.
"The building is arranged on a 9.8-foot structural grid, which is expressed both internally and externally to give clarity and order to the composition," says Chapman from OB Architecture.
The simple building materials —brick, timber, off-white render, glass, and zinc— and the elevation of the house take its cue from Manor Court.
The design was a response to the homeowner’s request for a bright, modern, and sustainable, four-bedroom home. The clients wanted open-plan living areas, a direct relationship to the garden, and thresholds that blur the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
The two-story house is positioned adjacent to the massing of Manor Court so that the profile of its roof edge on the first and second floors align with the eaves and ridge of the property.
The glazing faces the lake, providing privacy from the road.
The first-floor cantilevers out and is perched like a platform, serving as a great viewpoint for observing the surrounding forest scenery.
Rather than create a typical two-story home, the architects have designed a multi-layered space with a series of platforms.
The facade of the house in Ritto maintains traditional elements.
Jamie and Ingrid stained the timber facade a dark blackish-brown to blend the shack into the landscape, but kept the window frames white for a stark pop of contrast.
Architect Allison Reeves was renovating a townhome in Red Hook when she discovered that the existing redbrick facade was falling apart. With contractor John Fasano, she put in a new exterior of dark bricks, punctuated by a slanted pane of glass by Bieber Windows. A new roof supports a deck as well as the home's mechanicals, which the residents opted to move out of harm's way after Hurricane Sandy flooded other homes in the area.
The architects were looking to create a space that would reflect the client’s eclectic and playful sensibility, while also establishing a connection between the new living spaces and lush garden.
Although the house is perched on a high ridge, it sits modestly within the spectacular scenery.
The central, rectangular, concrete structure features expansive glazing which showcases the stunning scenery from every angle.
The backyard exterior view at night.
Riffing on local farmhouses, architects Patrick Walker and Elizabeth Demetriades covered the 4,000-square-foot house in rough-sawn red cedar and capped it with a standing-seam galvalume roof.
Landscape architect Jamie Purinton blanketed Debbie Cooper and Dan Sternberg’s Hudson Valley property with native species. Among them are purple love grass and prairie dropseeds, which grow by the Cor-Ten garage. “Both have wonderfully airy flowers and fall colors that connect well to steel,” says Purinton.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Exposed concrete walls provide thermal mass and protection from wildland fires.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
At once part of the city and protected from it, the house benefits from plenty of open space and light and creates its own courtyard enclosure.
Farnham walks the couple’s Vizsla, Kasia, down the sloped alley upon which the 

house sits. Hill’s renovation maintains some Victorian character in the decorative eaves 

and scaling, but the home is largely an anomaly for San Francisco.
Marcel Breuer Hooper House II Exterior Side Wall
A second green roof is planted with sedum and plays host to one of the family’s favorite spots: a hammock. Bentheim suggested adding a trellis overhead to soften and balance the appearance of the facade.
The black facade of the Yatabes’ house may turn a darkly futuristic face to its suburban block, but behind it the house is full of light. In Saitama, a tightly packed neighborhood near Tokyo, the black metal screen affords the family privacy without sacrificing outdoor space.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.