1316 Exterior Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 6

Designed by Szu-Ping Patricia Chen Suchart and Thamarit Suchart of Chen + Suchart Studio, the Staab residence stands in stark contrast to its suburban context but in harmony with the Sonoran Desert.
This dwelling joins a number of structures—such as a boathouse and guesthouse—owned by one family and used for vacations. They needed a new house to accommodate new generations at the reatreat.
Poteet describes the space as “unbearably hot” before he used spray-foam insulation between the exterior walls and the interior bamboo. “Now it’s the equivalent of a steel ice chest,” he says.
In the winter, instead of floating over the pond, the hut sits lightly above the snow. "It's protected and serene but alive with subtle energy," Poss says. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.

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The steel-clad Rolling Huts designed by Olson Kundig Architects in Manzama, Washington, sit lightly on the land thanks to wheels that allow the tiny residences to "hover" above the site, optimizing views of the landscape. Photo by Derek Pirozzi.
Rolling Huts by Olson Kundig

There are a lot reasons to follow Olson Kundig on Instagram. One of them is their seminal Rolling Huts project.
A Rolling Hut. Photo by Tim Bies, Olson Kundig Architects.
This 1,000 square-foot weekend cabin in Mazama, Washington, is essentially a "steel box on stilts," according to the firm. The three-story structure, which includes a living room and kitchen, can be completely shuttered when the owner is away.
Rough-sawn plywood and standing-seam metal siding clad the house. “In cabins, we like to use undressed materials, which lend themselves to the simplicity of the structure,” says architect Tom Lenchek.
This quaint cabin is located on Ragged Island, 20 miles off the coast of Maine. Photo by: Eirik Johnson
For the Butterfly cabin, which is part of the Post Ranch Inn, Muennig chose materials that age gracefully when exposed to the elements. He regularly uses Cor-Ten steel, a group of steel alloys that form a stable rust-like appearance when battered by wind and rain.
Delta Shelter, a cabin getaway on the same property as the Rolling Huts. We visited the owner and his wife during one of our visits to get an in-person reference for Tanner Construction. It was wonderful to see the house in person after drooling over it in the pages of Tom Kundig: Houses. Photo by Tim Bies.
This 191-square-foot cabin near Vancouver and its glass facades "forces you to engage with the bigger landscape," architect Tom Kundig says, but it seals up tight when its owner is away. The unfinished steel cladding slides over the windows, turning it into a protected bunker. Read the full story here.
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At just 350 square feet, this remote cabin with a view for the Sol Duc River sits on stilts to protect it from flooding and the dampness of the northwestern rainforest. Its shutters can be operated manually by custom steel rods.
The jagged edges of the roof are meant to resemble the surrounding peaks of the Cascades. The exterior HardiePanel vertical siding is painted “dark pewter” by Benjamin Moore.
A standing-seam steel roofing panel clads a portion of the exterior, while the aluminum pipes also serve as the railing for the roof deck. The family cooks all their meals at the fire pit outside.
Renzo Piano's Diogene cabin on the Vitra campus in Switzerland, as published in Cabins (Taschen, 2014).
A cantilevered cabin designed by R D Gentzler blends into the forest, even as it hovers above a 20-foot drop-off. Its south face is almost entirely glass, but a roof canopy limits solar gain. “We sit on the deck all afternoon watching the trees, and the time just flies by,” says resident Maricela Salas.
Short StackA tiny cabin in the Wisconsin Woods makes a big impact with Johnsen & Schmaling's innovative stacked design. The resulting cozy abode is stylish and durable, with stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
The view from Bruce's cabin is a sight for sore eyes. One of the outermost inhabited islands on the American eastern seaboard, Criehaven (technically Ragged Island) is located 20 miles off the Maine coast and one mile south of Matinicus Island.
When Alex or Bruce leave the island, closing up shop is as simple as sliding panels of corrugated metal into place to protect the windows.
One of the early challenges of building the house was defining the property lines of the lot, which had come to be known as "the floating acre" among the local fishermen.
The screen porch serves as an auxiliary dining area and extends past the house to capture views and cross breezes.
Alex devised a system that takes advantage of ocean views while protecting the cottage from that same northeasterly orientation. The large windows and doors can be shuttered with corrugated aluminum panels.
Buyers should cast as wide a net as possible in terms of location and amenities.
Constructed on land he had owned for years, this tiny cabin is also totally green.
Project Name: G640 Model
Detailing of laser-cut aluminum panels at rear façade.
The home’s dramatic rear façade is composed of perforated metal screens, by Flynn & Enslow, attached to Fleetwood windows. The second floor bump out is cantilevered with no structural post below.
The rear façade is illuminated at night.
When Brill purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for mid-century lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh gutted the 1,800-square-foot building completely and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.
Project Name: Desert Canopy House

Website: http://www.sander-architects.com/
Land Ark RV’s Draper is a midcentury modern-inspired tiny house with clean lines, a simple and elegant layout, and an angled ceiling.
Draper is fitted with 12 dual-pane tempered windows, eight of which are operable and four of which are fixed angled.
The Cumaru deck can be lowered and raised for transport in two minutes via a manual winch mounted inside.
Land Ark RV used Camura—a renewable Brazilian hardwood—for the deck and the inset siding.
At night, the exterior sculptures take on a dramatic appearance.  The home appears as a sculpture in itself, filled with colorful pieces to admire.
The second guest suite, clad in cedar and aluminum, extends over a horizontal limestone wall.
Dramatic in its horizontal expression, this private residence appears to extend into the landscape via deep overhangs and visual transparency.
The futuristic residence is defined by its natural topography emerging from the landscape, yet partially embedded within it.
Find a realtor who listens to your wish list, and who is willing to get you what you want—it can be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
"The large, overhanging patio and timber shutters assist in eliminating unwanted afternoon sun. The remainder of spaces remain oriented north, with optimal overhangs to ensure climate comfort throughout seasons," explains Engelbrecht.
The home at dusk.
The façade juxtaposes the rich oxidized patina of Cor-ten steel with the deep, earthy tones of reclaimed redwood beams.
The entrance of the home stands out against the blue California sky.
The hillside home is nestled into its surroundings and enjoys breathtaking views of Mt. Diablo.
Pathways meander around the property, which is filled with oak and fruit trees. In fact, the expansive, gently sloped hillside would be an ideal spot for a future vineyard or olive trees grove.
The deceptively simple design makes it a well-recognized masterpiece of midcentury design.
Nestled into its Laurel Canyon location, the home overlooks a shallow rectangular pool.
Australian spotted gum wood was used for sections of the exterior wall.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
The roof is standing-seam galvanized metal and the siding is Thermory driftwood.
"The most challenging part of the project was the fact that the foundation started 25 feet in the air. Until the foundation was built, every piece of material needed to be rigged into place via ropes, chains, and cables," Will says.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.