400 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

After months spent researching solutions to make her home’s fabric roof functional, Lisa Sette can finally relax.
Although the house is perched on a high ridge, it sits modestly within the spectacular scenery.
The central, rectangular, concrete structure features expansive glazing which showcases the stunning scenery from every angle.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Exposed concrete walls provide thermal mass and protection from wildland fires.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
At once part of the city and protected from it, the house benefits from plenty of open space and light and creates its own courtyard enclosure.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
A cross sectional view of the house.
An aerial view of the clean-lined, futuristic home.
A staircase and a ramp rise where the transverse structures meet the pool volume.
The walls and ceiling structure rest upon two longitudinal beams of the same length, which have been placed under the floor slab. The same four walls that support the ceiling extend past the floor slab to create the base level for the bedrooms on the south end of the house.
The concrete beams support four walls, while also extending beyond to create massive, 23-foot-long cantilevers at both ends of the structure. As a result, the profile of the home looks like the letter "H" in the horizontal position, levitating on a slope.
Three bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the first level. Each room can adapt to accommodate a varying number of occupants.
The house is split into three levels.
Coastal Sunset ,  Jacob's '73 BMW 2002
“The house is a piece of origami made out of triangular shapes, which we then draped over the landscape,” says Arbel.
The couple’s son Dylan and dog Petra enjoy the deck while Mary Kate and Thomas work in the kitchen below. Sliding doors open to the outdoors on both sides.
Large, dramatic openings bring transparency and contrast to the 10-inch-thick concrete facade, framing perspectival views of the landscape.
Master balcony designed to give the experience of being in and living below the canopy of a tree.  The windows are positioned and oriented to allow the ocean breezes to flow through the home
North Elevation
Designers Christopher Robertson and Vivi Nguyen-Robertson conceived their house as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms: a low concrete wall, a concrete cube, and a boxclad in Siberian larch.
The clients were active participants in the conversation about how to mitigate challenges like street traffic noise (the house is set right on a major thoroughfare) and how to relieve some of the visual pressure of the openness of the front facade. The garage is located below the envelope of the height and coverage-restricted house which results in the floor and driveway level with the street, a critical detail in snow country.
In contrast to the intensity of the front facade is a wood-skin section of the house on the rear facade, containing sleeping areas that cantilever over the outdoor bar and dining area.
The house is anchored to its sloping site through a series of steps that lead from street-level to front entrance, and through the identification of the garage as a central element of the architecture.
“Your first impression is that the house is very closed,” says David Barragán of the building he designed with Jose María Sáez in Quito, Ecuador. Stacked concrete forms, developed by Barragán and Sáez and used as planters along the front facade, offer privacy and integrate the building with the site.
The concrete platforms are set on large black columns, and cantilever over the driveway. Underneath the house is a workshop and parking area.
Cho’s recently completed vacation retreat, the Concrete Box House, was inspired by the use of raw materials. Cho decided on grape vines as an unusual landscape element.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
Set on the edge of Puertos de Beceite national park in Aragon, Spain, and available for vacation rentals, Casa Solo Pezo is a striking concrete square structure set on top of a smaller concrete square bass. Designed by award-winning and MoMA-exhibited Chilean architects at Pezo Von Ellrichshausen, this thoroughly modern residence has proportions and an interior layout that follows those of traditional Mediterranean homes with a strong indoor/outdoor connection.
Designed Californian architects Swatt Miers, these three tea houses on a private property were conceived as spaces outside the main home that would be free from the distractions of Internet, telecommunications and television. The largest of the three pavilions is used as a workspace, the second as a bedroom, and the third as a meditation pavilion.
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Tehachapi Mountains, California
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
The living area floats atop a deeply recessed steel-reinforced concrete block structure.

Tasmania, Australia
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
“Simple rectangular  volumes with simple details” is how designer Thomas Egidi describes the house he created for architect Carlos Dell’Acqua in Malibu. “I wanted to stress its horizontality,” Dell’Acqua notes. Inside the dwelling, which is entered via a bridge that pierces the 25-foot-high main facade, the view  opens up to a panorama of mountains and sea. Ipe flooring is used for the walkway and throughout the interior.
SIERRA LEONA
Architect Bruno Despierre built a deck for outdoor activities from pine wood.
Located on a steep site with limited suitable building ground, the firm decided to cantilever the home over the hillside, which has the effect of helping the structure blend in with the landscape.
Built as part of a functional farmhouse, the original building's ground floor was used to store food and animals, a situation that didn't exactly call for expansive views or large amounts of natural light. Vieira da Silva maintained a similar layout over the two-story home, with social areas on the upper floor and bedrooms on the ground floor, but opened up the lower level with large windows. "With the pre-existing stone walls we created patios, keeping a distance [between the walls] so we could have big openings, and create a close and intense relationship with the landscape and the ruin itself."
Built in 1948 and named 'Toyhill' by Wright himself, this Usonian home is considered an artistic masterpiece and shows Wright's early interest in overlapping circular masonry, which would become an innovative and iconic treatment found in his later work—including the Guggenheim Museum.
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Built with specially-formulated concrete made of volcanic ash, this micro-house in Tokyo maximizes space through vertical construction. 
When Tokyo-based architecture firm Atelier TEKUTO received a brief from their clients to build a distinctive, environmentally-conscious concrete home, they embarked on a two-and-a-half year journey of spacial and material exploration. Built in 2015, the result—the R Torso C project—recently won the Overall Excellence Award and first place in the low-rise buildings category at the 2017 American Concrete Institute Awards.
Its cast-concrete roof slabs evoke any number of desert sights—the fronds of a palm, the faces of stones, even the armored plates of an armadillo.
Throughout the site, the original bolders that have been left untouched are evident as the home engulfs them into its design.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.