319 Exterior Brick Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The entrance door is made of mirror-like glass to enhance privacy.
The gaps in the brickwork naturally brighten the interiors.
The gaps between the courses also allow the brick wall to double as a window, framing views and drawing in more light and air.
The traditional bricklaying technique enabled the second-level interior space to become larger.
The home located at 56 Willow Street is a pet-friendly property, and has additional storage in the basement, as well as a part-time superintendent that looks after the co-op building.
The home is like stepping into a time capsule.
The well-preserved midcentury home sits on a half-acre lot near the Knollwood Country Club in Granada Hills. The lot features a gorgeous outdoor space that includes a sprawling lawn, a covered patio, and a swimming pool and spa.
The outdoor space has been landscaped with synthetic turf, as well as drought-tolerant plants.
A street view of City House reveals its cheerful, teal accents.
The flattop Eichler at dusk.
The home's elegant post-and-beam construction as seen from the exterior.
Named Tama's Tee House, 'Tama' is short for Tamarama—the Sydney beach suburb where the home is located.
A nighttime view of the home seen from the northeast. To the right is the bedroom wing extending north. To the left is the living room wing stretching to the east.
The view of the house seen from the driveway. To the left is the workshop and wood shed connected to the carport by a trellis.
Set far back on a wooded 7.2-acre property in Bernardsville, New Jersey, the James B. Christie House takes advantage of its private location with ample glazing.
The post-and-beam construction was designed for indoor/outdoor living and has been perfectly preserved over the years, with only two owners.
The Gardiner House is an authentic midcentury gem nestled into the Hollywood Hills.
The home is thought to be one of the first brick structures in the area.
Respecting the site’s heritage, the architects retain the house’s terrace façade.
A new anthracite zinc roof sits within the walls, and protrudes upward to create extra interior height.
"We bumped up the roof line in two spots to create dramatic ceilings in the living area and flood the rooms with light," explains Hannah. "The brick and hardboard were then painted black, and we added cedar siding to add depth."
Soup Architects built a new, stand-alone work studio in the lower section of the garden to provide a different orientation and perspective to the main house.
The David and Gladys Wright House is considered FLW’s last residential masterpiece.
A view of the guest house, which is included in the sale.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
A bright orange door adds a pop of color to the home.
The backside of the guest house.
Beautifully renovated, the home has excellent curb appeal with low maintenance landscaping.
Main elevation
As its name suggests, the house rests upon wooden stilts, which passively cools the interiors.
Writer Marc Kristal described the house as "a lapidary example of Miesian simplicity: a 25-by-95-foot rectangle, composed of a black exposed-steel frame, front and northern elevations clad largely in white glazed brick, and southern and western exposures enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass sliders."
A flat roofline and solid post-and-beam construction create the clean lines of this classic midcentury profile.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.