2291 Exterior Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
Minim Homes are wrapped in beautiful shiplapped cyprus that will gently age to grey. And a 960-watt solar array on the roof can be battery powered, allowing the home to be completely off-grid if desired.
"The roof that connects the two volumes makes it possible to use the patio even when it rains or when the dew settles," note the architects. "This way the house is adapted for Swedish summer— it works in all kinds of weather."
The timber decking that connects the existing cottage to the new volumes emphasizes indoor-outdoor living.
The volume that extends toward the south of the site (to the right of the central volume) also contains two bedrooms.
The house is clad in vertical planks of black-painted fir.
A place of unspoilt nature, the island property spans approximately 1.6 acres.
A new 50-years cedar shake roof with copper flashing was installed just last year.
Along with its modern, refined appearance, the architects also relied heavily on concrete due to the material's resistance to seaside aggression—such as salt, humidity, and wind, which are unsparing agents of rapid decay.
The flattop Eichler at dusk.
The home's elegant post-and-beam construction as seen from the exterior.
The home has been professionally landscaped with native drought-resistant plants.
The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.
Built for television and documentary film producer Kerthy Fix, The Hive is located behind the client’s main residence in East Austin.
The one-bedroom abode features a wood-and-steel frame clad in oversized cedar shakes repurposed from the roof of another home.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Architect Brian White clad the new second story of his formerly dark and cramped ranch-style home with a black-stained cedar rain screen. The large opaque window lights up the stairwell and the second floor.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
The entry is tucked behind a louvered screen, creating a winding path to the front door. The screen, composed of Alaskan Yellow Cedar, shields views from the sidewalk while still allowing interior occupants to see out, and foments "a sense of elegance, mystery, and warmth," says the firm.
Gently sloping roofs reach towards the water to the west, and the mountains to the east, reacting to the scenery adjacent to it.
The home fully embraces the natural setting, reaching out and embracing the natural wonders.
Wood paneling provides a pop of contrast on the front side of the home. The two-car garage is to the left.
The two, season-specific wings of the L-shaped plan are separated by a covered breezeway.
Tomas Haeger and Tina Linde’s desire for simple weekend and  summer living led STEG Arkitekter to design a multi-volume retreat for the couple on the island of Tjörn. Clad in locally sourced fir, the house perches on pillars directly atop boulders that mark the steep site. “The idea was a place for contemplation and recharging our batteries,” says Tomas.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
The exterior door adds a pop of color to the white and gray facade.
Steel columns echo the Norwegian folk form.
The house features a simple gable roof.
A massive oak tree is the focal point of the entry courtyard. The entrances to each unit are sheltered beneath the overhanging second-story balcony.
A nighttime view of the home seen from the northeast. To the right is the bedroom wing extending north. To the left is the living room wing stretching to the east.
The view of the house seen from the driveway. To the left is the workshop and wood shed connected to the carport by a trellis.
Set far back on a wooded 7.2-acre property in Bernardsville, New Jersey, the James B. Christie House takes advantage of its private location with ample glazing.
Western Red Cedar with a clear vertical grain was paired with vertical and horizontal shiplap for the exterior siding.
The back of the home opens up to an outdoor patio, hot tub, and fire pit.
Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, the A-Frame was constructed with cedar siding and metal roofing. The house faces east toward the water.
The post-and-beam construction was designed for indoor/outdoor living and has been perfectly preserved over the years, with only two owners.
The Gardiner House is an authentic midcentury gem nestled into the Hollywood Hills.
A 669-square-foot, one bedroom, one bedroom guest unit, the Trillium is a zero-net energy house with a large outdoor storage closet.
In contrast to its heavily glazed north facade, the home's other three sides are closed off from view for privacy.
A concrete patio wraps around the house.
Many of the corrugated metal walls are painted black and white, in shades by Benjamin Moore.
The post-and-beam construction has a dramatic carport entrance which showcases the home's clean, midcentury lines.
A splash band of black Richlite wraps the base of the building to protect the timber siding from the snow and rain.
A separate two-car garage is located near the entrance of the house, which has a bike rack and planters out front.
Reinforced concrete was used for the retaining walls and slabs along all grades, while wood framing with steel framing beams were used at cantilevered areas.
"Both the deep-set windows and the brise soleil, in addition to the back canted wall, help to control solar gain."
A glimpse of the entrance at dusk from the south elevation. To the right is a swimming pool shielded behind wooden fencing.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.