792 Exterior Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The double-stacked wood wall from the exterior.
The  main house was given a contemporary look by way of a metal roof and a black exterior.
The slightly trapezoidal shape of the site provides a rare opportunity for views down the coast from the interior of the house.
Strategically placed openings on all sides of the façade secure the ocean and hillside views, and provide maximal natural light to all interior spaces.
Corrosive sea air can deteriorate metals and slowly peel away paint, so the architects wrapped the building in aluminum and a non-corrosive metal, and coated it in a resilient rustproof paint.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.
Upcountry Maui Cottage and Barn:  Cottage lanai screen detail
Upcountry Maui Cottage and Barn
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
A new anthracite zinc roof sits within the walls, and protrudes upward to create extra interior height.
The surrounding grounds were relandscaped to create even more privacy and garden views from the house and around the tennis court and pools.
Essentially, the entrance was kept in the same spot, with the chimney to the far right side.
A look at the repurposed shipping containers for the back-of-house operations before final assembly.
Ryan says to think of the Mono as a "safe haven to escape to when you need a retreat."
"Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day," explain the architects. "They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass."
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
The Mono can be shipped in about six to eight weeks as a complete structure. Once it's delivered, it can be used immediately.
Although the team states that a Mono can be placed anywhere in North America without a permit—like a backyard—a place with a view is preferred.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It comes in three variations.
“Screening along the east provides some visual protection from the neighbouring properties whilst not compromising any of the views or natural light, which fills the living space and kitchen from morning until late afternoon,” adds Chris.
Outdoor stairs lead to an accessible rooftop deck that offers 360-degree views. Kliplock metal sheeting clads the roof.
Bespoke Cor-Ten cladding wraps around the home to meet local bushfire regulations.
Capral 900 series aluminum-framed glazed sliding doors wrap around the living area to establish an indoor/outdoor connection.
The Mount Macedon House is the first-ever building constructed on this site.
The secluded and tranquil setting is a complete departure from the clients' former home in an inner Melbourne suburb.
"It was important to the owner as well that the site not be over-excavated, but rather emerge gently out of the existing landscape," explains Chris. "The elevated and light form essentially grew out of this."
Nestled into the side of Mount Macedon, the home is on a remote site surrounded by nature, yet still within a commutable drive to Melbourne.
Pederson was thrilled to be able to keep the home's floor-to-ceiling glass walls—a feature not possible with new construction because of the Title 24 restrictions.
The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
"The forms interpret the township’s alpine setting using height, volume, and pitch to create a dynamic experience as one moves between buildings and between internal spaces," says Allfrey. "Openings are carefully placed to ensure a casual connection between buildings."
Three separate structures surround an elevated dining platform and sunken terrace. Each of these buildings contains its own sleeping areas, which allows a degree of privacy and independence for family members and guests.
A view of the stairs through a window in the courtyard.
Front view of home and guest house/garage.
Front view of main home.
Front facade with ipe wood slat siding, standing seam metal roofing and central "factory window"
Front view of ipe wood facade, standing seam metal roofing, central "factory window"
Detail of copper facade
Design provides a delicate layer of privacy, capturing the coastal breezes from all rooms and successfully bringing the outside in.
View from outdoor garden to addition interior
Potrero Residence Trellis Detail
Rear view onto vast landscape with strong lines, custom curtain wall and large overhangs to protect form the sunlight

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.