272 Exterior Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

Architect William Ruhl tackled a host of programmatic and logistical challenges to renovate a house in Rockport, Massachusetts, for himself and his family. Located in a coastal floodplain, the original structure was raised so that storm surges can flow through the bottom level.
Narigua House (El Jonuco, Mexico)

Architect: David Pedroza Castañeda

Category: House
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
The exterior of Jayna Cooper's house in Los Angeles. "As I was designing my house I kept in mind standard lumber and plywood sizes so that there would be minimal waste," she says. "When choosing materials, I did basic research on cost per square foot and picked out some of the least expensive materials in the building industry. Basic, inexpensive stuff like corrugated sheet metal, stucco, and drywall can look really great if it’s incorporated into the design in a modern and well-thought-out way."
Rear portico framing rear access to house
Exterior entry
At the rear of the house, exterior steel cladding by Vicwest updates the look of the facade, while a steel footbridge connects the garden to the main floor of the house
Fir slats on the wall and ceiling run through to the outdoors, visually expanding the space.
Made of scraps taken from the containers’ sides, the roof creates a sense of openness from the inside and ushers in sunlight. Its slanted design creates a wind tower effect, providing natural ventilation that negates the need for air conditioning.
The architect and his team devised an armature on the back of the container that will eventually be covered with vines, concealing the AC and heating unit, the reservoir for graywater and the composting toilet outlet.
Using insulted metal panels that were rejected from the construction of a tennis center nearby, this sustainable home in Kansas by Studio 804 was inspired by the prefab Lustron houses that were developed in the United States after World War II.
Four prefabricated alpine micro-houses by COMMOD-Haus were added to art-lodge – a boutique hotel in Carinthia, Austria. The transportable and environmentally friendly timber frame structures were delivered to their designated spot at the end of a winding mountain road and mounted securely with ground screws. The houses were assembled within hours and the only part that was built on ute was the terrace. Part of the farmhouse hotel complex, guests in the 248-square-foot micro-houses can use all of the hotel’s facilities.
Located on the roof of the historic Gilsey House in Manhattan’s NoMad district, this renovated penthouse has an expansive sliding glass door that retracts into the zinc facade, opening up the master suite to a garden terrace with restored historic handrails.
Exterior
Photo by Tom Bies
Exterior
Bold, red-colored shipping containers were used to create a (12 meter long) visitor area extension for the National Theatres Company of Korea. Designed as a social zone for theatregoers, the space was equipped with internal sliding partition walls that can be opened or closed to allow for flexible use of the interior spaces.
Brook Bay Residence
Working with architect Vincent James in the late 1990s, Coen and Partners were charged with integrating the 8,000-square-foot Type Variant House outside of Minneapolis into the ever-changing, lush wooded surroundings.
The house in the evening, with the main living space and basement illuminated. "It gets pretty windy here," Jamie says. "I have nightmares about the roof coming off like the lid of a can."
In Boulder's aptly named Wonderland Hill neighborhood, deer and even mountain lions occasionally come down from the woods to scout the domestic scene, but the most common wildlife sighting on the tree-lined streets is a profusion of toddlers in off-road strollers. To make space for the local baby boom, many older one-story homes have had their pops topped. When Rob Pyatt and Heather Kahn were ready to expand on their 900 square feet, however, their foundation couldn't support a second floor, so Pyatt, an architecture student with a green building background, devised an alternative. His box-shaped addition is the modern kid on the block, with distinctive corrugated-metal and wide-plank cladding. Behind the facade, uncommon materials share a common story with the neighborhood: Of design decisions driven by a desire to keep the next generation—and the planet—healthy and safe.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
A 1.4-kW solar array by Sharp and propane-powered in-floor radiant heating from Radiantec obviate any need to connect to municipal power.
“The first floor was about making something warm and woody that would blend into the natural environment,” architect Stephen Chung says of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home. “The second floor was a chance to experiment.”
Exterior Front of House with Board Form Landscape Walls
Theron Humphrey's new home in Nashville, Tenn.
Dotted with colorful footholds, a climbing wall covers one side of the home, allowing roof access.
Plants found in the surrounding landscape were used to obscure the lines between designed and natural worlds.
Marmol and Becket with their daughter, Emilia. The intersecting modules were designed to frame a range of spectacular desert vistas.
Leo Marmol and Alisa Becket enjoy one of their home’s many outdoor spaces.
Leroy tools around on his mini turbo tractor while munching on a gigantic cookie; his parents look on with envy.
The plan is simple: Two rectangles are connected by a bridge that traverses a desert wash. The effect of the light shining into the glass-walled living room is what first attracted Sette and Shikany to the house.
Moreland House
Moreland House

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