52 Exterior Tiny Home Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

L.A.-based Icelandic natives Erla Dögg Ingjaldsdóttir and Tryggvi Thorsteinsson of Miniarc created the 320-square-foot Iceland-inspired tiny dwelling Plús Hús, to be a sustainable and useful solution for addressing the housing shortage in their adoptive home. The Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) is prefabricated at the company's mnmMOD’s facility in downtown Los Angeles, shipped flat pack, assembled with minimal waste and can be delivered anywhere in the U.S. starting at $37,000.
Based in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Wind River Tiny homes designs and crafts custom tiny homes. Able to build from pre-existing plans or design a completely customized homes, they also promote
The Austin-based Kasita, has designed a stand-alone tiny home that they call the Independent. Starting at $89,000, the award-winning micro-home perfect for those want to live simply, or for the backyard of a homeowner who looking to add a guest house, granny flat, or a rental.
New Frontier Tiny Homes’s Alpha, is one of the fanciest tiny homes around. The 240-square-foot modern design is super functional and good looking to boot. They also have a larger model, Escher, a model that at around 300 square feet, is more spacious and offers two bedrooms.
For the last two years, Brian Crabb has been designing and building custom Tiny Homes from the ground up all over the world. The 238 sq ft
The Greenmoxie tiny house project is 340-square-feet, sustainably built , and can be completely off-the-grid. Completely customizable their prices start at $65,000.
The Oregon-based tiny home builder's flagship model, the Catalina, has a bright airy feel and offers which has a sleek look cool modern interiors.The home comes in three sizes—24, 28, or 32 feet—and features exterior details such as cedar accent siding and black metal framing. The home has two lofts, one for storage and one for sleeping, ample living space, a bathroom with a full shower, bathtub and toilet, and an optional solar setup allows the home to run off the grid. The Catalina starts at $65,000.
A polychrome facade made of salvaged, 100-year-old barnwood gives this small, lofted cottage space its unique character. Its copper roof is also reclaimed, a lucky Craigslist find from a local remodel. Though the structure has a footprint of just 11' x 14', it provides a useful space to entertain, catch up on work, or relax.
OFIS arhitekti + AKT II + Harvard GSD Students, Alpine Shelter Skuta Mountain
AO, Alpine Shelter “Bivak II na Jezerih”
Nicknamed “Woody”, this 236-square-foot trailer which has taken a young, upwardly-mobile couple from Austin, Texas, to the Rocky Mountains hamlet of Marble, Colorado. The trailer, which cost just around $50,000 to build has modern birch-veneer plywood fit outs and skylights, and accommodates a half-size refrigerator, eight-inch-deep storage compartments built into the floor, a loft bed and even a galvanized-steel cow trough bathtub.
The contrast between the old, dilapedated brick structure and the new, smooth Corten steel create a balance between the old and new.
Japanese architect Takashi Kobayashi of the Tree House People has been declared a “tree house master” by Design Made in Japan. Seamlessly integrating nature and design, this tiny tree house is certainly not just for children.
A mere 172 square feet, the treehouse in the hills of Brentwood in Los Angeles was designed by Rockefeller Partners Architects, Inc. as a refuge, gallery and guest cottage

For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.
The Park Model
The Wedge tiny home model
Light and shadow play on the textured facade.  Greenery frames the simple, geometric form of the house.
The custom screen door is visible on the far side of the space.  Windows are strategically located to frame views of the exterior landscape.
When the Ferguson Sauder family—parents Meg, a school counselor, and Tim, a design instructor, plus kids Cole, Olive, and Asher—wanted a multifunctional backyard addition, they decided to build it themselves. Two Liftoff chairs by Tim Miller, one of Tim’s former students, surround an oil-drum fire pit set in granite dug up on the property. On the deck, the Panamericana chair is by Industry of All Nations.
To keep the project close to their $10,000 budget, the family looked for bargains whenever possible. The circular window was a misorder they snagged for 90 percent off from a local building supply store. The mahogany siding is a mix of Craigslist purchases and Dumpster finds.
Boise, Idaho–based architectural designer Macy Miller built her own 196-square-foot home, which she shares with her partner, James Herndon, their newborn, Hazel, and the family’s Great Dane, Denver. The exterior cladding, which Miller stained for a uniform effect, is a mix of nearly a dozen types of wood plank, including poplar, oak, and fir.
Project Name: Island House

Website: http://www.2by4.nl/language/en/
Project Name: Basic Pod

Website: http://www.pod-idladla.com/
Experience the unique architectural heritage of Italy’s Apulia region at Brindisi Trulli, an ancient trullo that was transformed into a modern vacation rental home.  
If you’re traveling to Puglia in Italy, one of the most iconic sights are trulli (trullo is the singular), an ancient hut that's specific to the Itria Valley in the Apulia region of Southern Italy. Made with dry stone, trulli, which date back to medieval times, have an unmistakable conical roof that's shaped somewhat like a gnome’s hat.  
Through Boutique Homes, you can now rent a modernized trullo that's been cleverly restored to enhance its ancient architectural appeal, while providing a comfortable, contemporary shelter.
Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces. In warm weather, Montague’s parties spill onto the roof deck. To encourage guests to explore, Peterson designed two built-in light fixtures, made from LEDs behind white acrylic panels, that cast a dramatic glow across the sauna’s custom-made wood door, designed by Peterson and crafted by carpenter Daniel Liebster.
A basic box that’s as tall as it is wide (28 feet) and 16 feet long, this Portland, Oregon house consists of rooms stacked vertically: an unfinished basement on the bottom, a kitchen-living area and a bathroom in the middle, and a bedroom on top, with the stairwell hinged onto the front of the home. The only interior doors are those to the bathroom, basement, and root cellar, leaving the rest of the space open and unfettered. At just 704 square feet, Katherine Bovee and Matt Kirkpatrick's home is a great lesson in making the most out of every inch. Click here to see the interior.
Designed by architect Jeffery Poss, the tea hut is the first of what Kalanzis and her husband, Bill Cope, hope to be several sculptural structures on their property, which comprises a forested grove to the east, a former tree farm on the west, and the main house and hut in the middle. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.
An artist by trade, and gardener by passion, Allison Paschke commissioned Providence-based architecture firm 3SIXØ to build a modest cottage that would allow her to reconnect with nature. She landscaped the home’s lush gardens herself.
Sebastian Heise’s wooden structure, seemingly atilt, overlooks a green valley in Oberwiesenthal, Germany. The two horizontal windows on the side and the front porch give the home its own unique sense of balance.
Jaanus Orgusaar's NOA cabin in the Virumaa region of northeast Estonia. The structure rests on three feet, so it doesn't require a foundation.
Though the retreat is clearly meant to afford the solitude writing so often requires, Kathleen reports that "it's very lively. Deer approach, birds bathe. The sun warms my desk and you can hear the rain."
“This was really a parameter-driven project,” explains Lukasz Kos, a Toronto-based designer and cofounder of the architecture firm Testroom. “That is, I had to let the trees decide how the tree house would be.”

What the trees decided, apparently, was that they wanted a gracefully slender, Blade Runner–like elevator lodged between them. They also decided they didn’t want to be too mutilated in the process. Kos responded to their needs with the low-impact 4Treehouse, a lattice-frame structure that levitates above the forest floor of Lake Muskoka, Ontario, under the spell of some witchy architectural magic.

He created this effect by suspending the two-ton, 410-square-foot tree house 20 feet above the ground with steel airline cables. With only one puncture hole in each of the four trunks into which the cable is anchored, the trees get away almost entirely unscathed, and the structure attains the visual effect of being suspended weightlessly in midair. 

At the base of the tree, a staircase rolls on casters upon two stone slabs, allowing occupants to enter and exit regardless of how much the tree house may be swaying or rocking in the wind. Solid plywood walls punctuated by a floor of red 

PVC constitute the “opaque” base story, which is largely protected from the outside elements. “The idea was to have the tree house open up as it gained elevation,” explains Kos. The second story is surrounded by a vertical lattice frame, allowing for breezes, air, and light to filter softly through walls while still establishing a visual perimeter between outside and inside space. At top, the tree house is completely penned in, a suspended patio with a ceiling of sky.  br> br>Photo by Lukasz Kos.
A lightweight frame enclosed with taut fabric and sheets of Jobert Okume marine plywood are used for this 44-square-foot hybrid prefab trailer house.
The back view of the
The roughly 160-square-foot modules, dubbed Mini House 2.0, were built in collaboration with Swedish manufacturer Sommarnöjen, and are delivered flat-packed.
The Porter cottage makes the most of its unwieldy site. The cottage was sited as close to the water as legally allowed to take advantage of the views and far enough away from the graywater leach field where the soil is deep enough to allow for proper run off. The screen porch was angled to capture direct southern exposure for the solar panels.
Erin Moore of FLOAT Architectural Research and Design, based in Tucson, Arizona, designed a 70-square-foot writer’s retreat in Wren, Oregon, for her mother, Kathleen Dean Moore, a nature writer and professor of philosophy at nearby Oregon State University. The elder Moore wanted a small studio in which to work and observe the delicate wetland ecosystem on the banks of the Marys River. Enlisting her daughter’s design expertise, her professor husband’s carpentry savoir faire, the aid of friends, and a front loader, Kathleen and her crew erected the structure in September 2007. Photo by Gary Tarleton. Totally off the grid—–Kathleen forgoes the computer and writes by hand when there—–the Watershed was designed to tread as lightly on the fragile ecosystem as the wild turkeys and Western pond turtles that live nearby. “
This 191-square-foot cabin near Vancouver and its glass facades "forces you to engage with the bigger landscape," architect Tom Kundig says, but it seals up tight when its owner is away. The unfinished steel cladding slides over the windows, turning it into a protected bunker. Read the full story here.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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