461 Exterior Tiny Home Design Photos And Ideas - Page 8

Light and shadow play on the textured facade.  Greenery frames the simple, geometric form of the house.
The succulent planter facade is a low-maintenance living wall.
Every “Seed Stitch” ceramic tile is made intentionally unique.
Over 4,500 3D-printed ceramic tiles clad the 120-square-foot backyard building’s wooden balloon frame.
They have lived in their tiny house for more than a year now, and Robert says that the most challenging, but also the most educational and character-enriching aspect of the project was realizing that mistakes made during construction (like an imperfect mitered corner) will be forever remembered, and experienced first hand in the years to come.
Corrugated metal siding on the front of the house.
Pig Rock Bothy and Inshriach Bothy are tow of the handcrafted structures that inspire artists who use it a residency spaces.
The goal was to be able to squeeze a full bathroom, kitchen, living room, storage, as well as a sleeping space that would accommodate a king-sized bed into the cabin's original tiny footprint.
The house can accommodation a range of optional extras such as shelving, storage, window or door additions, awnings, planter boxes, and more.
With a base price of $79,000, this 194-square-foot trailer is a complete tiny house on wheels and offers its owners flexibility of layout, as well as a wide range of optional customizations.
Although Jay Nelson thinks it’s great that there’s interest in tiny homes, and that is pushes us to minimize our consumption and environmental footprint, he feels that really tiny houses can be challenging for most people.
A peek at the back side of the trailer where the front door is located.
Th towable, double-axe trailer home is 28 feet long.
A custom rock wall system that takes care of the couple's shared passion for bouldering.
AO, Alpine Shelter “Bivak II na Jezerih”
Nicknamed “Woody”, this 236-square-foot trailer which has taken a young, upwardly-mobile couple from Austin, Texas, to the Rocky Mountains hamlet of Marble, Colorado. The trailer, which cost just around $50,000 to build has modern birch-veneer plywood fit outs and skylights, and accommodates a half-size refrigerator, eight-inch-deep storage compartments built into the floor, a loft bed and even a galvanized-steel cow trough bathtub.
The contrast between the old, dilapedated brick structure and the new, smooth Corten steel create a balance between the old and new.
The design eschews right angles on the exterior and interior, which was one of the most challenging aspects of the design for Kallesø.
The Park Model
The custom screen door is visible on the far side of the space.  Windows are strategically located to frame views of the exterior landscape.
When the Ferguson Sauder family—parents Meg, a school counselor, and Tim, a design instructor, plus kids Cole, Olive, and Asher—wanted a multifunctional backyard addition, they decided to build it themselves. Two Liftoff chairs by Tim Miller, one of Tim’s former students, surround an oil-drum fire pit set in granite dug up on the property. On the deck, the Panamericana chair is by Industry of All Nations.
To keep the project close to their $10,000 budget, the family looked for bargains whenever possible. The circular window was a misorder they snagged for 90 percent off from a local building supply store. The mahogany siding is a mix of Craigslist purchases and Dumpster finds.
Boise, Idaho–based architectural designer Macy Miller built her own 196-square-foot home, which she shares with her partner, James Herndon, their newborn, Hazel, and the family’s Great Dane, Denver. The exterior cladding, which Miller stained for a uniform effect, is a mix of nearly a dozen types of wood plank, including poplar, oak, and fir.
Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces. In warm weather, Montague’s parties spill onto the roof deck. To encourage guests to explore, Peterson designed two built-in light fixtures, made from LEDs behind white acrylic panels, that cast a dramatic glow across the sauna’s custom-made wood door, designed by Peterson and crafted by carpenter Daniel Liebster.
A basic box that’s as tall as it is wide (28 feet) and 16 feet long, this Portland, Oregon house consists of rooms stacked vertically: an unfinished basement on the bottom, a kitchen-living area and a bathroom in the middle, and a bedroom on top, with the stairwell hinged onto the front of the home. The only interior doors are those to the bathroom, basement, and root cellar, leaving the rest of the space open and unfettered. At just 704 square feet, Katherine Bovee and Matt Kirkpatrick's home is a great lesson in making the most out of every inch. Click here to see the interior.
An artist by trade, and gardener by passion, Allison Paschke commissioned Providence-based architecture firm 3SIXØ to build a modest cottage that would allow her to reconnect with nature. She landscaped the home’s lush gardens herself.
The back view of the

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.