49 Exterior Small Home Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Project Name: MINIMOD

Website: http://mapaarq.com/
Project Name: Portable Prefab Outside Boxes

Website: http://www.bertandmayspaces.com/
The garage door was replaced with a new entry to the building, featuring a custom steel canopy over the front door. The door is painted Benjamin Moore Flamingo's Dream to better contrast with the black-stained, tight-knot vertical cedar siding.
The architects worked with the natural, six-foot slope of the site and built the Granny Pad into the hill to gain the needed interior height. The volume on the right is the original garage footprint, which now houses a kitchen and sitting room. The added volume on the left hosts the bedroom, as well as a bathroom beneath the loft space.
The architects expanded the building to a total of 571 square feet. The rear entry, shown here, accesses a loft space that is currently used for storage. In the future, the loft might become an office or additional sleeping quarters, depending on the homeowners' needs.
The exterior is clad in a mixture of stained cedar and shou sugi ban siding.
The house has a compact, fold-down deck that’s handy for traveling.
The Hive was completed in May 2015 for a total construction cost of $160,000.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
A 669-square-foot, one bedroom, one bedroom guest unit, the Trillium is a zero-net energy house with a large outdoor storage closet.
The home's modular design is composed of an outer shell and an interior core unit that contains essential living functions, such as a bed, bathroom, and a small kitchenette.
The 31-foot cabin includes a four-foot spire.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
The chiflonera leads to the entrance of the cabin.
The backside of the guest house.
The detached guesthouse is reminiscent of Philip Johnson's iconic Glass House.
Even though the house can be connected to the city grid, it also has solar panels that collect energy from the sun and can produce its own energy.
Exterior with wrap around deck
A self sustainable, eco friendly, Australian made tiny home.
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“The cabin is elevated from the ground, and has slopes on the terraces and two floors. The slopes blends with the natural terrain and help reduce costs in foundations. The roof also has a steep slope to protect it from snowfall in the winter,” explains Lagos.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
ADU
The original carriage house was transformed into a bridal suite that now has three guest rooms.
When not in use, a lattice panel covers the facade, closing off and protecting the cabin when the couple is back in the city.
Scott and Lauren plan to track the energy use of their new-build’s electric equipment and appliances. The data will inform the size of their photovoltaic array they'll add to offset the energy costs of the ADU and the bungalow.
The FSC-certified Western Red Cedar siding, supplied by Sustainable Northwest Wood, was lightened and will develop a darkened patina over time.
Cut out of the walls at different heights, these doors reveal the unusual and quirky interior arrangement of the chalet.
The roof is composed of a single sheet of folded stainless steel, and features a gutter on one side for rainwater harvesting.
The award-winning tiny house builder ESCAPE has recently unveiled the first phase of Canoe Bay ESCAPE Village—a tiny home resort community in Northwest Wisconsin.
Fishbeyn and Wright love that their home is set in a natural landscape with an incredible mountain view.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
A wood trellis offers coverage and marks the entry to this 700-square-foot cottage ADU.
This Seattle ADU makes a modern statement that's clad in copper and cedar. The backyard
Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces. In warm weather, Montague’s parties spill onto the roof deck. To encourage guests to explore, Peterson designed two built-in light fixtures, made from LEDs behind white acrylic panels, that cast a dramatic glow across the sauna’s custom-made wood door, designed by Peterson and crafted by carpenter Daniel Liebster.
A basic box that’s as tall as it is wide (28 feet) and 16 feet long, this Portland, Oregon house consists of rooms stacked vertically: an unfinished basement on the bottom, a kitchen-living area and a bathroom in the middle, and a bedroom on top, with the stairwell hinged onto the front of the home. The only interior doors are those to the bathroom, basement, and root cellar, leaving the rest of the space open and unfettered. At just 704 square feet, Katherine Bovee and Matt Kirkpatrick's home is a great lesson in making the most out of every inch. Click here to see the interior.
Designed by architect Jeffery Poss, the tea hut is the first of what Kalanzis and her husband, Bill Cope, hope to be several sculptural structures on their property, which comprises a forested grove to the east, a former tree farm on the west, and the main house and hut in the middle. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.