215 Exterior House Wood Siding Material Stone Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Preproduction model with optional features shown.
Project designer Wayne Chevalier kept automobile elegance in mind as he remodeled the Malibu Crest residence. Here, he exits a Genesis GV80 parked in front of the garage.

Preproduction model with optional features shown.
The windows and doors feature an extruded aluminum-clad exterior that is finished with a durable 70% PVDF fluoropolymer coating in a Rustic color. The look is contrasted by light-colored stone covering the poolside patio.
The island home occupies a mountainside lot overlooking the beach and water. The construction utilized indigenous materials as much as possible, including fossilized coral, local volcanic stone, bamboo, and Wallaba wood shingles.
An exterior view of Maison Louis Carré as it delicately integrates into the surrounding landscape.
Aalto designed Maison Louis Carré with an immense lean-to roof made of blue Normandy slate, "pitched in imitation of the landscape itself". The facade is built from white bricks and marble, while the base and parts of the walls are Chartres limestone.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Tapped by art collectors to design an inspirational residence in rural Montana, Jackson Hole–based Carney Logan Burke Architects crafted a modern house that frames the property’s extraordinary landscape views.
Inspired by historic American farmhouses, this modern dwelling is sited at the base of the Rocky Mountain Foothills in West Boulder, Colorado. Designed by Surround Architecture, the 6,800-square-foot property features a unique layout that makes the best use of its one-acre site, while also responding to its long driveway access.
Landscape designer Kenneth Philip worked with mwworks to fill in the forested setting.
The home features a flat roofline, and it’s composed of stained red cedar, concrete, and basalt—materials that weather well and blend seamlessly with the land.
Like phase one, phase two will have a wood-clad foyer and dining area that will act as an extension.
In 2014, Jeff and Karen Gunning began researching building another house, hoping to create a single, contained volume without compromising their retirement funds. The resulting Tree House comprises three pitched volumes with cutaways to create a porch in phase one and recessed window planter ledges in phase two. Simple wood columns provide support.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
A post and beam entry plus a delicate brise soleil make up the entrance to 572 W Santa Elena Road.
The dramatic home features a striking black and white facade.
The Island House is largely closed to the street and open to the lake beyond.
A weathered metal sculpture at the front door echoes the larger piece in the home’s central yard.
At 16,700 square feet, the home is a lot to behold—but the streamlined palette makes it easier to take it all in.
The one-story homes blend seamlessly into the background due to a palette of basalt, cement, and imported African wood.
Located among lush, rolling hills in Valles Pasiegos, Spain, Villa Slow is a minimalist holiday home designed by Laura Álvarez Architecture. The property was once a stone ruin, and now it generates more energy than it uses.
The 15-foot windows provide breathtaking views of the surrounding hills and blue ocean waters.
The 12 homes are for-sale and rented throughout the year to tourists. When POLO Architects first become involved with the project, they wanted to make sure that the designs would be "as viable and sustainable as possible," POLO Architects Co-founder Patrick Lootens says.
Fifty miles north of New York City, a private island with a controversial home and guesthouse built from Frank Lloyd Wright’s drawings seeks a new buyer.
When Austin-based firm Matt Fajkus Architecture was tasked with renovating this classic midcentury home, they sought to open up the interior—not only by unifying the common areas into an open-plan layout, but also by literally raising the home's roof. This strategy increased the ceiling height on three sides of the home, allowing for the insertion of clerestory windows to create a bright and airy open living space. "The raised ceiling maintains the original pitched roof geometry to stay harmonious with the existing gabled roof in the private zone," explain the architects in a statement.
This chalet-style, A-frame roof extends straight into the ground. A band of stone wraps around the residence and visually integrates the home with its natural surroundings. Set against a stunning mountain backdrop, the home originally designed in 1958 has been completely reimagined and updated by its current owners. The owners enjoyed the process of renovating the architecturally significant property, which included a fun, tropical-themed wet bar, a stylish and updated kitchen with a waterfall countertop, and a well-concealed Murphy bed in the living room
Quite high on the list of client’s objectives was a very high level of thermal
performance. Generally, the amount of largely sized openings would have had the
potential to cause significant heat losses. To counteract this, we introduced our
clients to a German window manufacturer who is a trusted supplier that has
provided a top-quality product for several of our other projects. This supplier
custom built triple glazed tilt and turn joinery that was also made from Larch for
an overall cohesive look.
"We specified natural Larch cladding for this project because of its beautiful silver-grey
colour when aged, rustic clean look, exceptional durability and zero-maintenance
qualities." To further enhance the overall simple form and clean lines,
a rainscreen-like facade was developed to conceal gutters and downpipes behind
the cladding.
Located on 3.5 acres, the four-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath home rests on top of a hill and is nestled up against the Montauk Point State Park.
An early picture of Lynn Hall nestled against the hillside. The facade stood out for its clean lines, as well as the elegant use of natural stone and wood.
A recent photo shows the main structure and adjacent cottage, both of which were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007. At that point in time, this view of the property would have been hidden by dozens of hemlocks encroaching on the building.
The firm preserved that asymmetry by extending the roofline on one side and tucking the new kitchen and dining room underneath it.
The sandstone entry court segues gracefully into a protected exterior area with a bench, creating an inviting threshold between outside and in.
The remodel started in 2013, and construction wrapped in 2016. New exterior cladding includes cedar lap siding, both painted and left rough and finished, Montana Moss stone, and a standing-seam metal roof.
From the front, Greg Hoffman and Kirsten Brady’s home in Portland, Oregon, bears little resemblance to the daylight ranch house that once stood in its place. Yet upon closer inspection, it is clear that the enlarged structure is actually an updated version of the same dwelling that has occupied the site since the early 1950s. More windows, a trellised roofline, a basalt privacy wall, and a flat-roofed, top-floor addition are among the most striking changes. Plantings were also added to enhance the yard. “There was zero landscaping,” says Greg, “If you look at the original photos, the house was just sitting on the ground.” All of the new features are carefully oriented so that the sightline from the street through the house to the vista beyond remains open. “The original house had a gap in the hedge so people could see the view,” Greg recalls. “We said, ‘Let’s keep that.’”
"The choice of materials was made to fit the palette of the landscape and evoke the traditional farmhouses and cabins of the islands, but with a modern take that fits the freshness of the clients and that would serve them for generations to come," explain the architects, who clad the buildings with stained clear Western Red cedar siding as well as wood salvaged from snow fences and old barns. Natural stone quarried and fabricated in British Columbia grounds the main house.
Located on Orcas Island, the largest of the San Juan Islands in Washington, the year-round retreat includes a new main house and six renovated cabins loosely arranged around a semi-circular lawn facing the beach.
Built in 1957, this home was saved and dismantled at its original location in Illinois and relocated to its current location in Acme, Pennsylvania—only 30 minutes from the iconic Fallingwater. The Duncan House shares the 100-acre Polymath Park with three other homes for rent, designed by Wright’s apprentices.
Frank Lloyd Wright's Spring House in Tallahassee, Florida, was commissioned by George and Clifton Lewis, who sought a comfortable house for their large family that fit within their modest budget. Completed in 1954, the home features an unusual "hemicycle" form—a shape that the designer briefly experimented with at the end of his career. Now, a fundraising campaign aims to acquire, restore, and open the house to the public.
Taliesin West was Wright’s winter home and “desert laboratory” in Scottsdale, Arizona from 1937 until his death in 1959. The complex is the headquarters of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.