372 Exterior House Wood Siding Material Shingles Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The home is connected to a series of five unique outdoor spaces, hence its name: Five Yard House. Each yard takes a different approach to the landscape. The front lawn that faces the street is very orderly and manicured, and it maintains the appearance of the traditional neighborhood. “At one point, we debated a contemporary design for the steps leading up to the front porch—just to hint at the changes happening beyond,” says architect Miguel Rivera. “In the end, however, we decided it was best to adhere strictly to the historic nature of the district.”
The home’s 2,340 square feet span the upper and lower levels, while the basement can serve as an independent ADU, home office, or guest quarters. The lower-level entry is now more comfortable, with a wide waiting area protected from the weather overhead.
The Lofthouse is built one of the many hills separating it from the couple’s main residence. "Excavation was a challenge, as we wanted to maintain as much of the existing landscape as possible, but needed to clear out trees for the foundation," says Tarah.
"We love that our multipurpose space can act as a venue for productivity and collaboration in The Loft, while The House invites rest, relaxation, and connection as guests unplug at a quiet retreat in the woods," says Tarah. "The cherry on top is that we can do this from our own backyard, with our kids playing a special role in maintaining the property and hosting guests alongside us."
The new cedar will age naturally, gaining a silver patina over time. The garage was refaced with stucco.
Some windows that were salvageable were kept, while others were replaced with new Jeld-Wen units that Jocie liked better for their size, shape, or function. At the corner of the sunroom, for example, an angular corner window looks much cleaner than the two units that had been there before.
The architect streamlined the exterior by replacing the shingles with tongue-and-groove Eastern white cedar boards, grown and milled in Maine.
The back of the property has a relatively private feel for a downtown location. The living room opens out to the garden through two glazed walls, while the trellis cladding of the mudroom echoes the screens at the front of the home.
The clients had long owned the property in Mapleton Hill, and they were looking to build their dream “forever” home in which to raise their family. The public-facing side of the home is historically appropriate, with gables, dormers, a porch, and double-hung windows. While these features are traditional in many senses, the clean, minimalist detailing signals contemporary construction. Timber screens and lattices add a texture and translucency to the archetypal forms.
Organic lines mimicking those in nature can be soothing. Architect Tono Mirai, known for his "earth architecture," was inspired by the lush context for the design of this holiday home in Nagano, Japan.
Architect Johan Sundberg looked to Japanese architects like Kengo Kuma for inspiration for the design of a holiday home in southern Sweden. "We call it the Katsura typology, but that's probably sacrilegious," he says. The eaves of the gently sloped hipped roof extend generously in all directions, turning the deck into a covered retreat that’s part veranda, part engawa, the Japanese version of a porch.
“An angled entry clad in white brick addresses the angle of the street and provides a place to pause before entering into the home,” says the firm.
This neighborhood in Whitefish, Montana used to be the grounds of a summer camp. “This was the last lot that had one of those original buildings, and it was the check-in office, which had been converted to a triplex,” says George. The clients own a custom snowboard and wakeboard company, and they wanted to “keep that camper, tree house–type feel with the massing” of the new house.
The cedar siding was rebuilt and painted in dramatic blue-black, and the deck was refinished. The team added white-framed windows and new earthen steps for a more integrated entryway sequence.
Black cedar siding gives way to bright interiors in the idyllic Highland Bungalow.
The traditional facade of this Craftsman home in San Francisco’s Noe Valley doesn’t give away its industrial-inspired interiors and the ultra-modern, glass rear facade. Originally built in 1906, the Valley Street Project was completely reimagined by architect Ross Levy and architect and interior designer Kevin Hackett for a tech entrepreneur, a community organizer, and their two children.
Jonathan Tuckey doesn’t so much whisper to old buildings as listen to them. Known for his innovative updates to historic homes, the British architectural designer was the obvious choice when his friends Al and Francesca Breach decided to bring new life to Nossenhaus, a centuries-old stone-and-timber structure they’d bought in the Swiss village of Andermatt.
A simple floor plan emphasizes the rugged materiality of this elongated, cabin-style home in Valle de Bravo.
The three townhouses, named the Shake Shacks, range in size from 1,400 to 1,600 square feet. Each has two bedrooms, one bath, and a flexible space at the ground floor which can be rented out or used as a home office. The gable roof shields a protected deck on one side, and a solar panel array on the other.
“I think from the outset when we were talking about the addition, there was this idea that it would be mod and contemporary and spliced into the old house,” says Dean. The thin wood slats that surround the back half of the home bridge divide between old and new, nodding to the existing building’s white wood-trim detailing.
Gresford Architects restored and renovated this historic family homestead in South East England. The old barn had been transformed into a residence, but the structure lacked its original barn-like character, which the owners wanted to embrace.
Interior designer Eva Holbrook and artist Jamie Williams brought this cozy mountain retreat back to life by embracing an “uncluttered simplicity” design concept. They brought the outdoors in by incorporating wood elements, big windows, and reclaimed materials.
The windows and doors feature an extruded aluminum-clad exterior that is finished with a durable 70% PVDF fluoropolymer coating in a Rustic color. The look is contrasted by light-colored stone covering the poolside patio.
The island home occupies a mountainside lot overlooking the beach and water. The construction utilized indigenous materials as much as possible, including fossilized coral, local volcanic stone, bamboo, and Wallaba wood shingles.
The 1830s mansion that is now Life House Nantucket was originally built by whaler Captain Robert Calder and opened as an inn in 1870.
After finding paradise on a Hawaiian papaya farm, filmmaker Jess Bianchi and jewelry designer Malia Grace Mau tapped San Francisco artist Jay Nelson to design and build their dream home in just five weeks. Located just one block from the beach, the home takes inspiration from laid-back surf shacks and is mainly built with reclaimed wood.
The roof creates a dialogue with the surrounding landscape through multiple sloped planes, irregular lines, and an absence of overhangs. The home's form appears to change according to one's angle of approach.
The house has two distinct wings—the 1885 original "front" and the contemporary "rear." The front part of the home has been restored to the original 1885 floor plan, while the rear of the home was demolished and replaced with a new build that contains the garage, bathroom, and storage on the ground floor, and the boys’ bedrooms on the upper floor.
Nestled between a forest edge to the southeast and the Pacific Ocean to the west, the home offers two distinct, panoramic views.
Aalto designed Maison Louis Carré with an immense lean-to roof made of blue Normandy slate, "pitched in imitation of the landscape itself". The facade is built from white bricks and marble, while the base and parts of the walls are Chartres limestone.
At the hands of Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, the renovation focused on their client’s love of modern design while remaining absolutely respectful of the existing architecture and period details.
The asphalt shingles that clad the exterior curve into the window openings, and an awning over the entrance appears to peel away from the facade. These details create the appearance of a skin wrapped around the entire building. The rammed earth walls are combined with seven-inch-thick wool insulation for thermal comfort.
The window and door frames are mainly crafted from cedar. They sit within the curved shell, which has deep eaves that protect the interior from the sun and reference traditional Japanese architecture.
The home is elevated about four feet above the ground to avoid moisture from the forest floor. The entire ground-floor living space opens up to a timber deck through sliding glass doors.
The home’s entrance is a timber door set into the “shell.” This leads into the heart of the ground-floor living space, which opens out to a timber deck.
The clients requested “architecture that is unusual, beautiful, and does not make you feel old in time.” Over the years, the timber and earth used to construct the home will develop a rich patina.
The shell is closed to the west and north elevations and open to the east and south elevations—an arrangement that responds to the location and orientation of the house in the forest.
Located in Providence, Rhode Island, the American Woolens Dye house is a brick and timber structure that was originally built in 1880. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and it served as a textile mill before a thoughtful and extensive renovation transformed the property into a gorgeous live/work space.
The couple spent two years renovating the home and named it the Filomena in honor of Michael’s Sicilian grandmother.
The fully glazed north faced overlooks a private garden to the rear. This large area of glazing allows natural light to fill the home.
The shingle roof juts out over an ample timber deck adjoining the living area, extending the living space outside.
A shingle roof is “draped” over the curved structure, connecting the interior and covered outdoor spaces. The shingles are crafted from Alaskan yellow cedar, which doesn’t require any treatment. The home operates off the grid, so rainwater is collected from the roof for drinking.
It was essential that the home felt nestled into the landscape, rather than perched on the edge of the dramatic clifftop site. “My client had commissioned a house design that was rejected by members of his family—the formidable force that is his sisters,” says architect Belinda George. “They felt the site deserved a more considered approach. As I had worked for Tom before on more urban projects, he asked me to design a bach for him and his family. He wanted it to feel relaxed and connected to the land.”
The South elevation features a single glazed section, which maintains privacy for the homeowners. It also increases the thermal efficiency of the home in a location that experiences extremes of temperature, with hot dry summers that top 35°C and cold winters where the temperature often drops below zero.
To make the home more thermally comfortable and energy efficient, eight inches of insulation was added to the roof, which is finished in yellow cedar shakes—a thicker alternative to shingles. The eaves of the house are painted in Outrageous Orange by Benjamin Moore, referencing the orange elements in the main living space.
Edgar referred to several precedents when working on the renovation. "I love Chad Randl’s book on the A-frame typology, which allowed me to understand what I had on my hands with its copious illustrations and drawing documentation," he says. "The lovable architect Andrew Geller did at least two seminal A-frame homes during the midcentury in the Hamptons, the Betty Reese houses I and II. I took the catwalk notion from Reese house II."
The existing porch at the front of the home, which functioned as a main entrance, was removed. Now, a newly built timber footbridge leads to a new entry vestibule at the side of the home. This footbridge wraps around the house to form an additional deck at the rear which can be accessed from the main living area.
The lower "basement" level sits beneath the main level of the home and is accessible from doors at the rear, and from an internal stair. The original deck was replaced by one that visually extends the new entry footbridge around the home.
The triangular form of the 1,189-square-foot A-frame cabin, which sits in a small forest of oak trees on Long Island, has been emphasized as part of the renovation.
While living in the Dortmannhof for several years, Milena and Max Schmiz cultivated a lush garden around the house with help from their two young children.
Located in the urban area of Essen, Germany, the historic Dortmannhof building typifies 18th-century half-timbered hall houses. Pictured is the bright blue front door located on the west side of the building.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.