147 Exterior House Wood Siding Material Green Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP created a sunken retreat in Karuizawa, Japan. Its glass lookout allows the residents to study wildflowers blanketing the forest floor.
Clad in salvaged wood and adorned with moss, the tiny hexagonal home has a footprint of 93 square feet.
The domino-like residential volumes are staggered on top of each other and feature deeply recessed checkerboard-patterned windows to reduce glare and solar gain. The pavilion is clad in cedar to complement the adjacent stone barn, as well as the property’s heirloom trees.
The pool volume features an 80' x 10' glass facade that slides open to connect the interior to the garden. “Minimizing the amount of deflection of the cantilevered roof at the sliding glass panels to a 10-millimeter max was a challenge,” say the architects. “We had to reinforce and brace the main structural beam greatly to stiffen up the roof, as well as double up our cantilevered beams.”
The structure’s “undulating belly” is exposed above the cave-like pool pavilion. The floors and outdoor paving feature locally sourced Eramosa limestone, a rock unique to Owen Sound.
The undulating wood-and-steel structure is engineered to hide a 90-foot steel structural beam that supports the cantilevered canopy and creates the illusion of a floating pavilion from the front.
The stairs lead up to a green roof that camouflages the building amidst the landscape and protects it from direct solar heat gain in the summer.
The wavy roof cradles a black steel staircase with Eramosa Stone treads that appears to levitate above the ground and leads up to the terrace.
The 338-square-foot Fold House combines a pool pavilion embedded into the hillside with a two-story guesthouse.
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
The front fence is made from sandblasted stainless-steel rods coated in a protective penetrating sealer. The fence is cantilevered out from a concrete beam below the garden, and the gate retracts into an underground pit. “It’s the first of its type in Australia,” says architect Tony Vella. “It was a work of precision to have these thin rods slide down into the ground through 30mm holes.”
The home incorporates a number of sustainable features. Glass walls are protected by concrete eave overhangs and automated external sun blinds. In addition, the heavily insulated walls, floors, and ceiling (with roof garden layers) add to the efficient energy performance of the home.
The home is located across from one of Melbourne’s bay beaches, and it needed to easily accommodate the family’s regular beach visits. “From morning swims to summer days on the beach, the home is intrinsically connected to the sun, water, and sand,” says architect Tony Vella.
The residents decided to build with a limited set of sustainable materials; for the facades, that meant wood, bamboo, or cork.
"I wanted the bones of the house to be bold, strong and simple,
The green roof, wood cladding, and low profile help to integrate the home with its lush, natural surroundings.
The home that Marlin Hanson, of Hanson Land & Sea, built for his family is clad with cedar shingles and features a green roof and a massive Douglas fir support beam that runs from the interior to the exterior.
"We were interested in this idea of treading lightly on the site. Using a green roof is a logical extension of that.  When you introduce a building that supplants a little piece of the forest floor, it's nice to replicate that on the roof as a return gesture to continue to create habitat for birds, animals,  and plants, and to help manage the flow of storm water," explains McFarlane.
Above the grass shingled roof, the protruding glass enclosure is an alluring portal to the dwelling beneath. Surrounding the glass lookout, 50 unique species of wild plants blanket the surface.
A living roof was carefully populated with indigenous plants and flowers. After functional considerations such as waterproofing and drainage were addressed by the contractor, Mitsuko Suzuki of the Shiiaru Club brought in native plants. "The soil is also mixed with the original soil, taking into account drainage and weight," adds Nakamura.
A bridge connects the home’s two volumes, which are divided between private and public spaces. The private spaces are protected through a series of screens and shading devices, while the main public living spaces are fluidly open to the outdoors.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
A two-story, timber volume holds the private areas while a one-story concrete pavilion is more social and communal. Large openings blend indoor and outdoor spaces while allowing coastal breezes to become part of the home environment.
Designed by Austin, Texas–based studio Andersson-Wise Architects, the 12,500-square-foot Stone Creek Camp is sited on a sloping hill whose topography guides visitors to discover the grounds slowly: from the gatehouse to the master house, main lodge, and guesthouse. The eco-friendly family retreat features a stacked wood facade that was built from fallen trees found on the site; a sod green roof that provides insulation; and regionally sourced construction materials—including stone, wood, windows, and doors.
The walls flare out at 30-degree angles, which creates more space for counters and seating inside the cabin.
At night, the home glows in the middle of the Norwegian wilderness.
Wide stairs lead to an open veranda that divides the family wing from the guest quarters. In another nod to rural Scandinavian style, the roof is covered in sod. “When the grass waves in the wind, it softens the rectilinear nature of the house,” says Casper.
The house is raised on columns to improve sight lines, keep snow drifts at bay, and lessen the building’s impact on the land.
Borrowing from the local vernacular, they clad the structure in skigard, a split-rail construction traditionally used for farm fences.
Designer couple Casper and Lexie Mork-Ulnes created a rustic retreat for their family on a mountaintop 45 minutes from Lillehammer, Norway.
A sitting area in the front yard encourages neighbors to stop by for a chat.
The home's green roof is an ode to the life of Arango's grandmother.
The compact residence, sided with tarred pine and glass, is surrounded by the Andes mountains.
Architect Alfonso Arango designed a 258-square-foot retreat with a green roof on the property of his childhood home in La Calera, Colombia.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
A glazed section perfectly frames country views amidst the book-lined walls of the home’s sitting room. A mobile panel allows residents to modulate light and privacy as they please.
The home is set amidst the monumentality of the Swiss Alps.
The home extends along a natural ridge.
One of the home’s larch-clad volumes appears to float above the site.
At night, the distinction between site and structure further diminishes as the home’s green roof blends into the land.
The wooden lamella detail beneath the gabled peaks makes reference to traditional Warmian-Masurian cottages, which are decorated with wooden boards arranged in various patterns.
The U-shaped plan of Music Box Residence by Scott Edwards Architecture has large volumes on both sides with a glassy two-story entry space in the middle. A long bridge, with a bamboo forest below, leads from the sidewalk to the main entry. The exterior is clad in black stained siding reminiscent of sho-sugi ban in order to pay homage to the family's Japanese ancestry.
In order to achieve a contemporary exterior while still keeping a feeling of warmth, Martin Gomez Arquitectos chose to use dark metal, black flagstone, and lapacho wood as cladding.
The black-stained wood siding of the Crossfield St House references London’s timber-clad houses from the 17th and 18th centuries.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
The upper floor is wrapped in glass, with the exception of the solid wood front door and the cantilevering roof.
The 4,600-square-foot home is set on bucolic farmland.
The home's two volumes are distinct not only in their orientation, but also in their materiality. The lower level is wrapped in stone, while the upper level is composed of glass.
Link Farm House by Slade Architecture
Although there are numerous Kebony roofs found in Europe and Asia Pacific, a university building in Kansas is the only other prominent North American example discovered by the structural engineer.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.